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Consolidated Homeless Fund Application Workshop Consolidated Homeless Fund Partnership January 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Consolidated Homeless Fund Application Workshop Consolidated Homeless Fund Partnership January 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Consolidated Homeless Fund Application Workshop Consolidated Homeless Fund Partnership January 2013

2 INTRODUCTION Welcome & Overview Introductions Handouts

3 INTRODUCTION Updates – Coordinated Access Plan Upcoming Webinars Other updates?

4 INTRODUCTION Resources – Interim Regulations – formingAmendments.pdf Resource Exchange – OHCD Website –

5 INTRODUCTION CHF Funding Sources: City of Pawtucket, Emergency Solutions Grant Program ($151,436) City of Providence, Emergency Solutions Grant Program ($411,969) City of Woonsocket, Emergency Solutions Grant Program (97,607) State of Rhode Island, Emergency Solutions Grant Program ($590,995) State of Rhode Island, Title XX Homeless Funds ($1,368,385) State of Rhode Island, HRC Homelessness Resources ($1,380,000) TOTAL: $4,000,392

6 INTRODUCTION Funding not included in CHF:  HUD McKinney Homeless Funding through RIH (Continuum of Care)  Other Title XX programs still managed by DHS  State and Local Community Development Block Grants  Emergency Food and Shelter Board/FEMA  Community Services Grant/Legislative Grant

7 INTRODUCTION CHF Important Dates

8 INTRODUCTION Goal/Purpose of Partnership  Reduce administrative burden on grantees, to allow more resources and time to be allocated to client services.  Develop consistent policies and procedures across municipal boundaries to allow for more effective and efficient programs and services.  Increase efficiency and reduce the duplication of administrative efforts across municipal and state units of government.

9 INTRODUCTION General Objectives of CHF:  Support existing homeless shelter and service providers: Operating and maintaining of emergency shelters. Support of essential services.  Provide emergency assistance to individuals and families who are currently homeless or face imminent homelessness (financial assistance and housing stabilization services).

10 INTRODUCTION CHF Eligible Activities  Shelter Operations/Maintenance  Essential Services  Shelter Prevention and Shelter/Street Services  Shelter Improvements  HMIS Management & Coordination

11 INTRODUCTION CHF Eligible Populations  There are two eligible populations identified for Consolidated Homeless Fund programs:* Homeless as defined by HUD (Categories 1 – 4) 1. Literally Homeless 2. Imminently homeless (within 14 days) 3. Unaccompanied youth/families who meet other Federal homeless definition (must also meet additional criteria for HUD, similar to 2) 4. Fleeing/attempting to flee Domestic Violence At risk of Homelessness as defined by HUD *Please refer to HUD’s full definition of homelessness and at risk of homelessness; what is listed above is only a summary.

12 HUD & OIG

13 The HUD Office of Inspector General (OIG) became statutory with the signing of the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law ) The OIG is an independent office within HUD. As an independent official appointed by the President the IG is free from undue influence or constraints in performing his function. What is OIG?

14 HUD/OIG Mission Statement Promotes the integrity, efficiency and effectiveness of HUD programs and operations to assist the Department in meeting its mission. Detects and prevents waste, fraud, and abuse. Seeks administrative sanctions, civil recoveries and/ or criminal prosecution of those responsible for waste, fraud and abuse in HUD programs and operations.

15 Where is OIG in New England? Hartford, CT Manchester, NH Boston, MA

16 HUD & OIG

17 The HUD Office of Inspector General (OIG) became statutory with the signing of the Inspector General Act of 1978 (Public Law ) The OIG is an independent office within HUD. As an independent official appointed by the President the IG is free from undue influence or constraints in performing his function. What is OIG?

18 HUD/OIG Mission Statement Promotes the integrity, efficiency and effectiveness of HUD programs and operations to assist the Department in meeting its mission. Detects and prevents waste, fraud, and abuse. Seeks administrative sanctions, civil recoveries and/ or criminal prosecution of those responsible for waste, fraud and abuse in HUD programs and operations.

19 Where is OIG in New England? Hartford, CT Manchester, NH Boston, MA

20 DETECTING FRAUD

21 HUD/OIG Investigations Public Corruption Mortgage Fraud Grant Fraud Program Fraud

22 Identifying Potential Investigations HUD CPD Staff State/Local Agencies Other LE Agencies Newspapers Public Hotline

23 Potential Fraud Misuse of Funds –False Eligibility –False Deeds –Misrepresenting Landlord –Multiple Applications –Identity Theft –Conflict of Interest

24 Potential Fraud Violations False Statements Theft/Embezzlement Wire Fraud Theft or Bribery Involving a Federal Program False Claims Mail Fraud Public Corruption

25 Things to Report Allegations of Fraud/Corruption Failure to follow regulations Failure to provide proper documentation

26 Ex-Layton administrator sentenced for misusing funds A former Layton city administrator has been sentenced for misappropriating federal dollars intended for low-income housing projects to pay his own salary. Three years of probation, and ordered to pay $116,064 in restitution. Embezzling public funds.

27 Former Director of Community Development for the city of East St. Louis was sentenced Three years in federal prison, $6,000 fine, $300 special assessment, and three years of supervised release following his prison sentence. Two counts of aiding and abetting wire fraud and one count of accepting improper benefits in connection with business conducted by his office.

28 Lewiston Developer sentenced to 14 Months in Federal Prison 14 months incarceration, followed by three years probation, $180,000 in restitution. Fraud and embezzlement. Misappropriating Federal money.

29 Asbestos Contractor pled guilty to Conspiracy to accept bribe Admitted accepting $10,000 in bribe to steer a HUD contract for the demolition of property to the company whose owner gave him the bribe. Faces five years in Federal prison and $250,000 fine.

30 New England Region Contact Alexander Rosania – Special Agent Direct Line: (617) OIG National Hotline – (800)

31 HEARTH ACT Updates & Implications

32 INTRODUCTION HEARTH – Homeless Emergency and Rapid Transition to Housing Program (HEARTH)  ESG – Increase for IHSP & HMIS Activities Allocations reduced from last year, as we had supplemental IHSP funds last year.  Regulation Changes – Statewide Assessment Process New Definition of Homelessness Other Program Requirements

33 HEARTH OVERVIEW Other Changes:  Increased emphasis on HMIS data quality and performance outcomes and outputs.  Employee compensation and other overhead costs directly related to carrying out services are eligible costs of those program components.  Indirect Cost Allocations are now eligible.  The Partnership must pay each subrecipient for allowable costs within 30 days after receiving the subrecipient’s complete payment request.

34 APPLICATION

35 Submit –  Paper Application – to Darlene  Electronic Application – to Darlene One Application Per Activity Type:  Shelter Rehabilitation  Shelter Operation (NEW OFS Application)  Essential Services for Homeless Persons  Intensive Housing Stabilization Program  HMIS Management & Coordination

36 APPLICATION CHF Review Process –  Capacity (20%)  Need (20%) Area/Population Served  Design (20%) Beds, Clients, Services  Performance (20%) HMIS, Consumer input, Measures Increased emphasis on this factor  Financial (20%) Budget, Match, Fundraising

37 APPLICATION Distribution Estimates –

38 CLIENT ASSESSMENT & SERVICE PLAN STANDARDS

39 HMIS

40 CLIENT ASSESSMENT & SERVICE PLAN STANDARDS REFER –  Outreach to Community & Improve Referrals ASSESS –  Short Standardized Assessment Form for all CHF Providers  Prioritize planning for return to Permanent Housing at program entry. RESPOND –  CHF Providers are system “responders”  Successful outcomes incentivized through annual Performance based “Bonus Awards” HOUSE -  The ultimate goal for all homeless households is to exit the system.  Once households are housed, CHF providers will offer follow-up case management services and resources on an “as needed basis” (IHSP, LIHEAP, etc).

41 DOCUMENTATION & ADMINISTRATION

42 ALL CHF Providers must:  Enter beneficiary data into HMIS (or Domestic Violence Provider Database) accurately and on a timely basis.  Follow the documentation standards in the CHF Manual.  See recent webinar! Posted on our website:

43 DOCUMENTATION & ADMINISTRATION ALL CHF Providers must:  Agree to participate in periodic onsite monitoring  Send staff to period workshops  Routinely request payments  Adhere to federal and state regulations (including requirements applicable to their ultimate funding source.)

44 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

45 CHF Providers will be held to performance standards outlined in their contracts. These performance objectives will be discussed and outlined in greater detail during the award and contracting phase following the review of submitted applications. If an agency repeatedly fails to meet their performance objectives current and/or future funding may be jeopardized. Periodic progress reports will be issued to providers to track progress.

46 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT Performance Outcomes may include:*  High number of clients exited to permanent housing;  Low number of clients exiting to emergency shelter;  High number of clients exiting shelters with an increase in income;  High number of chronically homeless clients exiting to permanent housing; or  High numbers of clients with a reduced length of shelter stay, prior to permanent housing.  Low number of clients with repeated episodes of homelessness. *The Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) will be used to track these outcomes, so the capacity to collect and enter data into HMIS is very important for any prospective applicant.

47 BREAK

48 SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS

49 Eligible Participants –  Individuals and families who are homeless. Eligible Costs –  The conversion or renovation of buildings to be used as emergency shelter for homeless families and individuals. Eligible costs include: Labor Materials Tools Other costs for renovation, including soft costs

50 SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS Minimum Period of Use – Major Requirements –  The emergency shelter must be owned by a government entity or private nonprofit.  Any renovations shall be sufficient to ensure that the building involved is safe and sanitary (review the Shelter Inspection Form in the Appendix).

51 SHELTER OPERATIONS

52 Eligible Participants –  Individuals and families who are homeless. Eligible Costs –  The costs for maintaining an emergency shelter, transitional housing facility, and/or Housing First Program. Eligible costs are limited to: Minor or Routine Repairs Rent Security Fuel Equipment Insurance Utilities Food Furnishings & Other Supplies necessary for operation

53 SHELTER OPERATIONS Types of Programs:  Emergency Shelters  Transitional Housing  Permanent Supportive Housing  Operation First Step: Back Home (For Newly Homeless) Almost Home (For medium to long term homeless)

54 SHELTER OPERATIONS Major Requirements –  Provide services for entire grant period.  Any family shelters/safe homes cannot deny entry to families with children under 18 on basis of age.  All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters that utilize a waitlist that are funded under this activity must participate in Statewide Family Shelter Hotline and Waitlist (operated by 211).  All family shelters, transitional housing facilities, and other shelters will target their services to the most vulnerable families on the waitlist.

55 ESSENTIAL SERVICES

56 Eligible Activities -  Case Management  Child Care  Education Services  Employment Assistance & Job Training  Outpatient Health Services  Legal Services  Life Skills  Mental Health Services  Substance Abuse Treatment Services  Transportation  Services for Special Populations  Street Outreach Eligible Population –  Individuals and families who are homeless.

57 ESSENTIAL SERVICES Major Requirements –  Provide services for the full grant year Year Round Programs: June 1, 2013 – May 30th, 2014  All clients entered into HMIS Ineligible Activities:  Any activities not detailed are assumed to be ineligible.  Any cost not directly associated with the supported activity.  Advocacy, planning, and organizational capacity building  Staff recruitment/training

58 HMIS MANAGEMENT

59 Eligible Activities: Funds to pay the costs of contributing data to the HMIS, including the costs of:  Purchasing or leasing computer hardware;  Purchasing software or software licenses;  Purchasing or leasing equipment, including telephones, fax machines, and furniture;  Obtaining technical support;  Leasing office space;  Paying charges for electricity, gas, water, phone service, and high-speed data transmission necessary to operate or contribute data to the HMIS;

60 HMIS MANAGEMENT Funds to pay the costs of contributing data to the HMIS, including the costs of:  Paying salaries for operating HMIS, including: Completing data entry; Monitoring and reviewing data quality; Completing data analysis; Reporting; Training staff on using the HMIS or comparable database; and Implementing and complying with HMIS requirements;  Paying costs of staff to travel to and attend HUD-sponsored and HUD-approved training on HMIS and programs authorized by Title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act; and  Paying staff travel costs to conduct intake.

61 HMIS MANAGEMENT Major Requirements –  Activities funded under this section must comply with HUD’s standards on participation, data collection, and reporting under a local HMIS.  A provider funded under this activity should have the capacity to provide: training, data review and analysis, monthly reports, and troubleshooting for all CHF agencies utilizing HMIS (approximately agencies, with up to 60 programs).

62 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM

63

64 Other Eligibility Requirements –  Client must be homeless but for this assistance (No other housing or financial resources available to them).  Client must be likely to sustain housing once assistance ends.  Client must be willing to participate in case management and financial counseling.  Client must meet income guidelines.

65 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Eligible Categories of Assistance –  Shelter Prevention Statewide  Shelter/Street Services Statewide  Re-Housing targeting the Chronic Homeless Statewide

66 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Shelter Prevention Statewide  Target most likely to present at shelter/street.  Not necessarily those persons with the least housing barriers and/or those who are highly self-sufficient prior to the provision of IHSP services.  Estimated 3-6 months of financial assistance and up to 9 months of case management and financial counseling

67 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Shelter/Street Services Statewide  Target most likely sustain housing once assistance ends.  Estimated 6-9 months of financial assistance and up to 12 months of case management and financial counseling.

68 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Re-Housing Services targeting the Chronically Homeless Statewide  Different from “rapid” re-housing, targets the longtime users of the system.  Estimated 3-6 months of outreach to engage and prepare clients for IHSP, then an estimated 6-12 months of financial assistance and up to 15 months of case management and financial counseling.

69 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM

70 Eligible Activities –  Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services, (Up to 24 months) including: Housing Stability Case Management Housing Search and Placement Assistance Landlord Mediation or outreach to property owners Legal services related with eviction defense and prevention Credit repair or financial counseling services Motel/Hotel Vouchers (1-3 days)

71 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Eligible Activities –  Short or Medium Term Financial Assistance (Up to 24 months) including: Rental Assistance (Includes up to 6 months of arrears) Rental Deposits Utility Assistance (Includes up to 6 months of arrears) Utility Deposits Moving Cost Assistance

72 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Major Program Requirements –  All units must meet state and federal Habitability and Lead Hazard requirements.  Households must participate in financial literacy.  Households must have a minimum of: 2 Case management visits (per month of financial assistance). 1 out of every 2 visits shall take place in the household’s residence.

73 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Major Program Requirements –  Clients must be recertified for eligibility every 3 months (Prevention) and annually for Shelter/Street Services.  Whenever possible, providers shall make use of pro-rated and graduated financial assistance models to help gradually transition clients to paying their rent independently.

74 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Rental Assistance Requirements

75 INTENSIVE HOUSING STABILIZATION PROGRAM Rental Assistance Requirements -

76 Questions? Comments?


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