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Unlocking the Potential of Gaming Technology Diana Oblinger, Martin Ringle, Linda Baer.

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Presentation on theme: "Unlocking the Potential of Gaming Technology Diana Oblinger, Martin Ringle, Linda Baer."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unlocking the Potential of Gaming Technology Diana Oblinger, Martin Ringle, Linda Baer

2 Learners

3 Product of the environment Video games Video games Computers Computers GenerationXGenerationX The Web The Web Multiple, mobile devices Multiple, mobile devices Instant messaging Instant messaging Online communities Online communities MillennialsMillennialsBabyBoomersBabyBoomers TV generation TV generation Typewriters Typewriters Memos Memos

4 Themes Digitally literate Digitally literate Always on Always on Experiential Experiential Mobile Mobile Community-oriented Community-oriented

5 Net Gen preferences Teamwork Teamwork Technology Technology Structure Structure Engagement & excitement Engagement & excitement Experiential activities Experiential activities Multitasking Multitasking Goal orientation Goal orientation Positive attitudes Positive attitudes Collaborative style Collaborative style Technology savvy Technology savvy LearningPreferencesLearningPreferences StrengthsStrengths ―Raines, 2002

6 Media literacy 10,000 hours video games 10,000 hours video games 200,000 s 200,000 s 20,000 hours TV 20,000 hours TV 10,000 hours cell phone 10,000 hours cell phone Under 5,000 hours reading Under 5,000 hours reading By age 21, the average person will have spent – Prensky, 2003

7 Games are a way of life An 8 th grader plays video games an average of 5 hours/week An 8 th grader plays video games an average of 5 hours/week By high school, 77% of students have played games By high school, 77% of students have played games 69% have played games since elementary school 69% have played games since elementary school By college, nearly all students have experienced games By college, nearly all students have experienced games Game sales nearly $7 billion (in 2002) Game sales nearly $7 billion (in 2002) --Jones, 2003

8 Games in college 60% of college students are regular game players 60% of college students are regular game players Games are part of students’ multitasking environment Games are part of students’ multitasking environment Games are integrated into daily life (and studying) Games are integrated into daily life (and studying) Students do not feel gaming impacts their studies Students do not feel gaming impacts their studies Men play more games than women Men play more games than women Computer games are most common form of games (video, computer, online) Computer games are most common form of games (video, computer, online) Students not exposed to games in the classroom Students not exposed to games in the classroom --Jones, 2003

9 Games as socializing Students play games to socialize Students play games to socialize Students play games while socializing Students play games while socializing Online game communities thrive Online game communities thrive --Jones, 2003

10 Types of gamers Committed gamers Driven by challenge; high tolerance for frustration; self-motivated Wanna be’s Identify with committed gamers; less tolerant of frustration Fun seekers Seek immediate gratification; games vie with other entertainment choices Time killers Play games to kill time; shallow players; want immediate rewards – Phillips, 2003

11 Games in Education

12 Educational value of games Active learning Active learning Experiential learning Experiential learning Problem-based learning Problem-based learning Immediate feedback Immediate feedback Learner-centered Learner-centered Games support Problem solving in complex systems Problem solving in complex systems Creative expression Creative expression Social relationships Social relationships Peer assessment Peer assessment Environments include

13 Attributes of games Individualized Games adapt to the level of the individual while providing support Challenging Games are built with multiple levels, ensuring user’s skills are challenged Motivating Games engage users for hours in pursuit of a goal Social Games can be played with others; online communities provide engagement Rapid feedback Games provide immediate and contextualized feedback

14 Augmented reality Combines physical world and virtual world contexts Combines physical world and virtual world contexts Embeds learners in authentic situations Embeds learners in authentic situations Engages users in a socially facilitated context Engages users in a socially facilitated context Computer simulation on handheld computer triggered by real world location ―Klopfer & Squire, 2003

15 Environmental detectives Players briefed about rash of local health problems linked to the environment Players briefed about rash of local health problems linked to the environment Provided with background information and “budget” Provided with background information and “budget” Need to determine source of pollution by drilling sampling wells and ultimately remediate with pumping wells Need to determine source of pollution by drilling sampling wells and ultimately remediate with pumping wells Work in teams representing different interests (EPA, industry, etc.) Work in teams representing different interests (EPA, industry, etc.) ―Klopfer & Squire, 2003

16 Results Augmented reality: engaging and easy Augmented reality: engaging and easy Cooperation and competition in game play Cooperation and competition in game play Gender patterns appear (males are number driven; females are interpersonally driven) Gender patterns appear (males are number driven; females are interpersonally driven) ―Klopfer & Squire, 2003

17 Arab-Israeli conflict In the real world, conflicts are resolved through politics In the real world, conflicts are resolved through politics Immersion in national & international politics Immersion in national & international politics Teams assume different roles; learn negotiation Teams assume different roles; learn negotiation Involves face-to-face and online Involves face-to-face and online Mentors and facilitators work with students Mentors and facilitators work with students Simulation & debriefing Simulation & debriefing University of Michigan University of Michigan ―Kupperman, 2003

18 Issues

19 Issues Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? ― What are the appropriate roles for game developers, content experts, instructional designers? ― How will entertainment value be weighed against educational value?

20 Issues How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? ― Will educational content be validated by a peer-review-process? ― Will games be shaped by the same forces as cinema or television, where content may be sensationalized or oversimplified?

21 Issues Could the need for high volume game sales lead to the “dumbing down” of curricular materials? Could the need for high volume game sales lead to the “dumbing down” of curricular materials? ― Will we see a “Wal-Mart” effect bring educational standards to the lowest common denominator? ― Can games be developed with enough flexibility to allow for institutional differences? For faculty differences? ― Will computer games allow for creative, out-of-the-box solutions to problems?

22 Issues How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? ― Will the time students spend on games take away from other activities (reading, lectures, papers)? ― Will games encourage students to resist more “boring” activities? ― Is there a risk that games will displace traditional teaching methods? Would that be good or bad?

23 Issues Will games have unintended consequences? Will games have unintended consequences? ― Beyond the academic content, what other types of information might be conveyed by games? ― What is the risk that negative themes or undesirable perspectives would be conveyed by educational games?

24 Issues How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? ― What kind of data will be needed to verify the benefits of games and improved learning outcomes? ― What have we learned about evaluating instructional software that can be applied to games? ― What size of investment can be justified by improved learning outcomes?

25 Issues Who will pay for educational games? Who will pay for educational games? ― Will colleges and universities pay for educational computer games or will students pay? Or both? ― Will licensing fees for games further strain instructional budgets or will such costs be balanced by savings elsewhere? ― Will the business model bring higher education and game developers into a dynamic symbiosis or will the producer- consumer relationship prevail?

26 Responses

27 Issues Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? Could the need for large scale sales lead to the “dumbing down” of smart games? Could the need for large scale sales lead to the “dumbing down” of smart games? How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? Will games have unintended consequences? Will games have unintended consequences? How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? Who will pay for educational games? Who will pay for educational games?

28 Issues Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? Who will be responsible for developing the content of games? ― It will be important to develop alliances between higher education and game publishers so that experts can work together to maximize the power of games with the pedagogy of learning. ― Other suggestions

29 Issues How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? How will intellectual integrity be safeguarded? ― Develop peer reviewers and review panels with the game publishers ― Clarify of purpose between educational games and other games ― Other suggestions

30 Issues Could the need for large scale sales lead to the “dumbing down” of smart games? Could the need for large scale sales lead to the “dumbing down” of smart games? ― Who determines the use of particular games within curricular support?  Standards for games - entertainment  Standards for learning within gaming situations ― Guidelines that preserve the intellectual standards ― Other suggestions

31 Issues How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? How will games be integrated with traditional teaching methods? ― One of many tools ― Use in teacher education courses ― Connection to pedagogy ― Other suggestions

32 Issues Will games have unintended consequences? Will games have unintended consequences? ― Yes, though difficult to predict ― Understanding by developers ― Standards and guidelines can assist ― Other suggestions

33 Issues How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? How will games be evaluated and the benefits documented? ― As with any pedagogy, this educational tool will require research ― Research agenda would include  Standards  Training  Evaluation  Clarity of purpose  Reporting channels ― Other suggestions

34 Issues Who will pay for educational games? Who will pay for educational games? ― Users ― Educators ― Need for a corporate/higher education symbiosis/collaboration ― Evidence from past incorporation of software modules ― Avoid producer/consumer model ― Other suggestions

35 Your questions

36


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