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Evaluating sources of information. Evaluating sources Evaluate three sources you have used in your research. This should be done in the format of an annotated.

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Presentation on theme: "Evaluating sources of information. Evaluating sources Evaluate three sources you have used in your research. This should be done in the format of an annotated."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evaluating sources of information

2 Evaluating sources Evaluate three sources you have used in your research. This should be done in the format of an annotated bibliography at the end of your report. ONLY THREE of your sources should be evaluated. Each annotation should evaluate the source for values and limitations, referring to origins and purpose. Each annotation should not be more than 150 words.

3 Source analysis (OPVL) ObservationsOriginsPurposeValuesLimitations What do you see? -What material(s) does it look like it may have been used from? -What are the shapes, colors, patterns, or symbols of the artifact? -Is their some kind of writing? -If there are characters, what do they look like? What are they wearing? What are they doing? What are the origins of the source? -Who created this source? -When was the source created? -Where was the source created? -How was the source created? What is the purpose of the source? -What kind of source is it? -Who is the intended audience? -Why was it created? What are the values of this source? -What does this source tell us about society at the time? -Why is this a good source to learn about the past? What are the limitations of this source? -How unreliable is this source? -What form(s) of bias might there be? Explain? -What questions does this source leave? -What could be added to make this source more valuable (to historians)?

4 Example Ehrenreich, B., Nickel and dimed: On (not) getting by in America. New York: Henry Holt and Company. In this book of nonfiction based on the journalist's experiential research (origin), Ehrenreich attempts to ascertain whether it is currently possible for an individual to live on a minimum-wage in America (purpose). This source is valuable because it provides an insider’s perspective on this topic as a primary source. As an experienced journalist (values), Ehrenreich is aware of the limitations of her experiment and the ethical implications of her experiential research tactics and reflects on these issues in the text (limitations). Being an investigatory peace, the author is forthcoming about her methods and supplements her experiences with scholarly research on her places of employment, the economy, and the rising cost of living in America (values).

5 desperate-measures desperate-measures


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