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Impact of the CAS service element on IBDP graduates Iara Lindemann EdD Student Supervisors: Prof Jeff Thompson and Dr Mary Hayden University of Bath, UK.

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Presentation on theme: "Impact of the CAS service element on IBDP graduates Iara Lindemann EdD Student Supervisors: Prof Jeff Thompson and Dr Mary Hayden University of Bath, UK."— Presentation transcript:

1 Impact of the CAS service element on IBDP graduates Iara Lindemann EdD Student Supervisors: Prof Jeff Thompson and Dr Mary Hayden University of Bath, UK Additional support: International School of London - Qatar

2 Overview 1.Background 1.International Education 2.International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme 3.Creativity, Action, Service 4.What is Service? 5.Experiential Learning 2.Research outline 1.Research Aim 2.Key Research Questions 3.Methodology 4.Data Collection Methods 5.Data Analysis (Preliminary findings) 6.Further Work

3 1.1 International Education The role of international education in the formation of active citizens Education of the ‘whole person’ –International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) –Creativity, Action, Service (CAS)

4 1.1 International Education & Citizenship “An international education develops attitudes and values which respect human dignity and which transcend barriers of race, class, religion, gender and politics” (IBO 2001, p.8)

5 1.2 IBDP pre-university course years two-year curriculum fulfills requirements of various national education systems incorporates the best elements of many countries (IB Guide 2001, p.1)

6 1.2 IBDP

7 1.2 IBDP – Mission Statement Emphasis on the ideals of international understanding and responsible citizenship Students to become: - critical and compassionate thinkers - lifelong learned - informed participants - conscious of shared humanity - respectful of a variety of cultures & attitudes (IBO mission statement, 1996)

8 1.3 CAS is… The heart of the IB Diploma Programme An experiential learning programme The whole of CAS is greater than the sum of its parts

9 1.3 CAS & Citizenship “CAS activities contribute very personally to citizenship at a local, national & international level” (Hill, 2003, p.56)

10 1.4 What is Service? Service is the action(s) taken by youth to address a community issue in a positive manner (Terry & Bohnenberger 2007, p.6) Service activities are often the most transforming element of the Diploma Programme for the individual student; they have the potential to nurture and mould the global citizen (IB 2001, p.7)

11 1.4 What is Service? “Service is not simply an emotional impulse, it is a demonstration of attitudes and values” María Piaggio (IB 2001, p.4)

12 “… the process whereby knowledge is created by the transformation of experience “ (Kolb, 1984) 1.5 Experiential learning Act Observation and Reflection Plan Apply learning

13 CAS Activity

14 2.1 Research Aim To explore the extent to which the service element of CAS can affect the education of the ‘whole person’ as a lifelong learner in a particular context

15 2.2 Key Research Questions What were the main Service CAS experiences by students? After having completed the CAS Programme, what personal awareness of social issues did the students acquire? What are the perceptions of students about how their abilities and skills may have further developed (or regressed) since leaving school?

16 2.2 Key Research Questions Are students who have completed the CAS Programme interested in being involved with service activities (i.e. any form of aid, social projects or volunteering)? To what extent has the service element of CAS influenced alumni in adopting practices of active citizenship at the local, regional, national or international levels?

17 2.3 Methodological approaches Case Study Approach Alumni at St. Paul’s School, Brazil

18 2.3 Case Study Alumni at St. Paul’s School, Brazil who successfully completed the programme from May 1999 until May 2008 São Paulo Source:

19 2.3 Alumni at St. Paul’s School

20 2.4 Data Collection Methods Web based questionnaire -301 IBDP graduates from responses Semi-structured interview -12 interviews Documentary analysis -67 students’ annual reports -IBO CAS Guides 1996 & 2003

21 2.5 Preliminary findings 1.What were the main Service CAS experiences by students? Service within the school Recycling projects Charity campaigns Caring for and teaching / learning –underprivileged elderly in nursing home –underprivileged children (babies/toddlers/teenagers) in nurseries/schools –underprivileged adults –HIV positive children –children with cancer –orphans –disabled

22 2.5 Preliminary findings 1.What were the main Service CAS experiences by students (N=54)?

23 2.5 Preliminary findings 1.What were the main Service CAS experiences by students?

24 2.5 Preliminary findings 1.What were the main Service CAS experiences by students? CombinationService only 1999 to to 2008

25 2.5 Preliminary findings 1.What were the main Service CAS experiences by students? Number of activities3 to 45 to 6 Breadth of location national/international at school/within city 9% 91% 29% 71% Choosing own Service activitiesminoritymajority Activities involving other CAS elementsminoritymajority

26 2.5 Preliminary findings 2.After having completed the CAS Programme, what personal awareness of social issues did the students acquire? Contact with the reality of Brazilian society Better understanding of social inequality Increased desire to be involved in service activities

27 2.5 Preliminary findings 3.What are the perceptions of students about how their abilities and skills may have further developed (or regressed) since leaving school? Majority of students who were exposed to further contacts with social projects tended to further develop abilities and skills acquired during CAS

28 2.5 Preliminary findings 4. Are students who have completed the CAS Programme interested in being involved with service activities (i.e. any form of aid, social projects or volunteering)? Majority of students who engaged in social projects acknowledged that their CAS experience was crucial to their continuing involvement in the wider society.

29 2.5 Preliminary findings 5. To what extent has the service element of CAS influenced alumni in adopting practices of active citizenship at the local, regional, national or international levels? Under investigation

30 2.6 Further Work Extent to which the service element of CAS can affect the education of the ‘whole person’ as a lifelong learner –Compare before and after 2003 –Cross-reference questionnaires/interviews/school reports –Assess influence of Service in life after completion of programme (1 to 10 years) and how it changed with time and experiences –How students with different life experiences perceive their role as citizens as a consequence of the Service experience

31 Thank You

32 Additional Slides To be used to clarify possible questions, if required

33 IBO Non-profitable education foundation Founded in 1968 Offers three programmes for students aged 3 to 19 Over 812,000 IB students 2,935 schools 139 countries

34 IB Mission Statement (1) The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

35 IB Mission Statement (2) These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right” (www.ibo.org/mission/ accessed on ).www.ibo.org/mission/

36 IBDP

37 IB Learner Profile IB Learners strive to be: - Inquirers - Knowledgeable - Thinkers -Communicators - Principled - Open-minded - Caring - Risk-takers - Balanced - Reflective

38 What is CAS? María Piaggio “It is an inside vibration, it is how and not how much” (IB 2001, p.7).

39 The Aims of CAS Before 2003After 2003 CAS programmes are designed:The aims of the CAS requirement are to enable students to develop: -to provide a challenge to each student in the three areas – Creativity, Action, Service -to provide opportunities for service to complement the academic disciplines of the curriculum and to provide balance to the demands of scholarship placed upon the IB student -to challenge and extend the individual by developing a spirit of discovery, self-reliance and responsibility -to encourage the development of the student’s individual skills and interests - an appreciation of the potential of the human mind and spirit - knowledge, skills and understanding - an awareness of humanitarian issues across the world - a recognition that education imposes lifelong ethical responsibilities - a willingness to inquire and an enjoyment of discovery -confidence in their ability to initiate change, both individually and collaboratively -autonomy and self-reliance -an appreciation of their own and others’ talents.

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41 Experiential learning Experience is transformed through reflection Reflection needs to be encouraged and developed Students need a “facilitator” to guide them A team approach is essential h the transformation of experience.” (Kolb, 1984)


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