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Competency Development Advanced Powerpoint presentation of the White Paper Prepared by the National Center for Juvenile Justice for use in Pennsylvania.

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Presentation on theme: "Competency Development Advanced Powerpoint presentation of the White Paper Prepared by the National Center for Juvenile Justice for use in Pennsylvania."— Presentation transcript:

1 Competency Development Advanced Powerpoint presentation of the White Paper Prepared by the National Center for Juvenile Justice for use in Pennsylvania August 2005

2 © NCJJ, 2005 White Paper Development JJDPC acknowledged CD as least understood JJS goal Focus Group of state and local practitioners charged w/ re-examining our assumptions, values & current approaches to delinquency NCJJ conducted background research and wrote drafts for review/consensus

3 © NCJJ, 2005 White Paper “White Paper” argues a specific position –What does CD mean? –Why is it important? –How is it done? Defines principles, practices and outcomes for CD that conform to the Juvenile Act’s purpose clause The “official” position: flag planted

4 © NCJJ, 2005 White Paper Points to next steps needed to translate “position” into action / practice Acknowledges that it’s not the last word but start of an extended discussion

5 © NCJJ, 2005 CD Examined Perspectives: –Positive Youth Development –Delinquency Prevention –Balanced and Restorative Justice Research –Most effective ways of reducing recidivism

6 © NCJJ, 2005 Positive Youth Development: All kids Need consistent, age-appropriate services, supports & opportunities they need to become productive adolescents and adults Acquire broad range of assets

7 © NCJJ, 2005 Prevention: At-risk kids Need clear, positive standards for behavior & opportunities to form prosocial attachments/bonds Increase Protective Factors

8 © NCJJ, 2005 BARJ: Juvenile Offenders Need experiential, productive activities w/ prosocial adults & peers Develop living, learning, working skills and reduce recidivism

9 © NCJJ, 2005 Research Most JOs outgrow del behaviors because they: –acquire skills and get a job –develop close, caring personal relationships –establish attachments & ties to prosocial groups and institutions

10 © NCJJ, 2005 “Competency” The capacity to do something well that others value Competence: “a sufficiency of means for the necessities and conveniences of life”

11 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development is… the process by which juvenile offenders acquire the knowledge and skills they need to become community members who are: –productive –connected –law abiding

12 © NCJJ, 2005 CD Domains 1. Pro-Social Skills 2. Moral Reasoning Skills 3. Academic Skills 4. Workforce Development Skills 5. Independent Living Skills

13 © NCJJ, 2005 Domains Not a complete list Areas that matter most –Increase resistance to delinquency –For success in school, work, and life –Deficits put offenders at risk for continued JJS involvement

14 © NCJJ, 2005 Primary activityused to advance CD is Skill Training Standard elements Conducted in counseling, classroom, or role-play settings over several sessions Developed/adapted for delinq pop Employ curricula/manual/tool Delivered with integrity

15 © NCJJ, 2005 More to CD than Skill Training Research is clear: Interventions that don’t help to build stronger relationships or bonds to pro-social entities positive roles for offenders in the community are unlikely to have long-term impact.

16 © NCJJ, 2005 Skill Training + Connecting Opps. Opportunities to: –practice / demo new skills in community –engage in experiential & productive activities –establish + relationships w/ law-abiding adults and peers –form ties w/ pro-social community groups and institutions –receive services and supports

17 © NCJJ, 2005 Opportunities & Challenges Kids in placement –Captive audience (control behavior/teach skills) –Work furlough, CS, off-site voc training designed to bridge transition from learning skills to using them in real-life settings –Collaboration among provider, PO, family –Re-thinking community service

18 © NCJJ, 2005 Probation has central role 1. Assess: across all 5 domains to identify targets/strengths 2. Plan: for addressing CD needs most closely associated w/ offending beh. 3. Connect / provide opportunities: the “process” 4. Oversee / monitor 5. Motivate 6. Document

19 © NCJJ, 2005 Others have responsibility Prosecuting and defense attorneys Detention staff Residential programs Schools Businesses, churches, community groups Parents and guardians

20 © NCJJ, 2005 Next Steps Assessment and Case-planning Protocols Promising Practices Case-closing form Aftercare model Training and development

21 © NCJJ, 2005 What will it take? Communication Compliance Continuing Development Commitment to CD and measure progress

22 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development OR Treatment Competency Development is ……. “The process by which juvenile offenders acquire the knowledge and skills they need to become productive, connected, and law abiding members of their communities.”

23 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development Is Not Treatment Competency Development has to do with acquisition of knowledge and skills Synonyms - ability, capability, capacity Treatment has to do with the systematic application of remedies to effect a cure Synonyms – care, regimen, rehabilitation, therapy

24 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development OR Treatment Not all Juvenile Court-Involved Youth Are in Need of Treatment But….. Most Could Benefit From Competency Development Activities

25 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development OR Treatment Treatment May Be A Necessary Prerequisite For Competency Development

26 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development OR Treatment May Need to Address: Substance abuse Mental illness Sexual aggression Serious cognitive / thinking errors

27 © NCJJ, 2005 Competency Development OR Treatment Before We Can Develop: Pro-social Skills Moral Reasoning Skills Workforce Development Skills Independent Living Skills Academic Skills

28 © NCJJ, 2005 Who is Responsible for Developing Competencies? The juvenile justice system has an important, yet limited, place in developing competencies Limitations Include Time – juvenile justice system should do what it can in the time available Legal authority – interventions must be related to offending behavior Available resources – can only work within the confines of existing resources Involuntary system - Cannot do it alone

29 © NCJJ, 2005 Measuring Competency Development Expected Outcome Delinquent youth leaving the system more capable of being productive, connected, and law abiding Performance Measures –Indicators of the degree to which activities have been completed and outcomes achieved

30 © NCJJ, 2005 Measuring Competency Development Composite IO Measure –A summary indicator that a juvenile “leaves the system more competent.” –Determined at the time of case closing –Addresses degree to which juvenile appears to be more: Productive Connected Law Abiding

31 © NCJJ, 2005 Measuring Competency Development Indicators of “Productive” –One or more of the following: Attending school and passing Attending GED prep / Alternative educ. Participating in vocational training Employed full- or part-time

32 © NCJJ, 2005 Measuring Competency Development Indicators of “Connected” –One or more of the following: Engaged with a mentor Engaged with a positive peer group Engaged in a club, organized school group (team or organization), or community group

33 © NCJJ, 2005 Measuring Competency Development Indicator of “Law Abiding” –No new adjudications / adult convictions or pending court cases three months prior to case closing

34 © NCJJ, 2005 Case-closing information can be aggregated to meet mgmt, admin and reporting needs Quantify degree to which competency development goal has been achieved and use in a “report card” Provide data regarding quality of existing competency development resources Help identify needed resources Facilitate planning, program development, and state reporting


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