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zSometimes you want to go where everybody knows your name, and they're always glad you came. You wanna be where you can see our troubles are all the same,

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Presentation on theme: "zSometimes you want to go where everybody knows your name, and they're always glad you came. You wanna be where you can see our troubles are all the same,"— Presentation transcript:

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2 zSometimes you want to go where everybody knows your name, and they're always glad you came. You wanna be where you can see our troubles are all the same, You wanna be where everybody knows your name.

3 cadre certification Participating Schools: Ross Elementary, Parkway School District Brentwood Middle, Brentwood School District Crestview Middle, Rockwood School District Fox High School, Fox School District Lindbergh High School, Lindbergh School District Contact: Diane Stirling

4 cadre certification Session I: September 15 yReconnecting with core values 8:30 yAssessing the Ten Essentials 10 - noon

5 cadre certification Base Line Data: October-November window xFor schools that do not have 2008 Survey Data xRoss, Brentwood, Fox High xCrestview & Lindbergh High have data – will take survey in February xCoordinated with cadre & technology specialist xSurvey results ready for review in January xSet up on-school-site review sessions

6 cadre certification zSession II: November 4? xNetworking: core values 3 – 4 p.m. xService learning 4 – 6 p.m.

7 cadre certification zSession III: December 1, 2009 xCurriculum Integration 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. xNetworking: review SL 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

8 cadre certification zSession IV: March __ xNetworking: Curriculum Integration am xClass Meeting Training & Practice 10 – 3 p.m

9 cadre certification zSession V: June__ 1 or 2 days? z9 a.m. – 3 p.m. xNetworking: Class meetings xCollaborative structures xStudent Leadership xData –Based Planning: target focus xPlanning Year 2

10 cadre certification zPreparation for Year 2 yLaunch Staff Orientation yUse norm setting class meetings schoolwide yUse class meetings to involve students as leaders in service learning initiatives yExpand curriculum integration & track it yConsider cross-age collaboratives

11 cadre certification zYear 2: yLaunch yReview, continue class meeting training yStaff meetings: char moments yIntrinsic rewards yPerformance-ethical values

12 zNotebooks or online postings?

13 ten essentials zA comprehensive, intentional community- wide approach to character education

14 Promotes core ethical values Defines in thinking, feeling, behavior Compre- hensive; intentional; proactive Creates caring schools Promotes moral action Academic Curriculum Develops self- motivation Staff is a learning, moral community Fosters shared moral leadership Engages family & community Assesses character of school Commty Participtn. Char Ed Policy Traits Identified Integrated Curriculum Experientl. Learning Evaluation Adult Role Models Staff Develpmt. Student Leadershp Sustaining Culture Gridlock

15 The why of Character Education zA fundamental belief that character lies within all of us and that we can create the environment that brings it forth and allows it to permeate and define our community.

16 The ABCs of Character Education zAutonomy zBelonging zCompetence

17 1. Community Participation –Educators, parents, students and members of the community invest themselves in a consensus- building process to discover common ground that is essential for long-term success.

18 1. Community Participation

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20 Nike Elementary, Meramec Valley School District

21 Promotes core ethical values Defines in thinking, feeling, behavior Compre- hensive; intentional; proactive Creates caring schools Promotes moral action Academic Curriculum Develops self- motivation Staff is a learning, moral community Fosters shared moral leadership Engages family & community Assesses character of school Commty Participtn. Nike’s community sponsors Nike’s assembly Char Ed Policy Traits Identified Integrated Curriculum Experientl. Learning Evaluation Adult Role Models Staff Develpmt. Student Leadershp Sustaining Culture Gridlock

22 2. Character Education Policy –Character education is a part of the district’s philosophy, goal or mission statement, including a formal, written policy adopted by the school board. In this way it becomes a part of the leadership of the school and community. –The district policy also should be affirmed and supported at the building and classroom levels.

23 2. Character Education Policy zVision Statement zBelief Statements zBoard Policy zHonor Pledge zHonor Code zTouchstone

24 2. Character Education Policy zMark Twain Community Pledge zGenerated by students and reviewed by students each year zI will not hurt anyone on the inside or the outside. zI will use my hands for peace, not pain. zI will use my heart for love, not hate. zI will use my voice for compliments, not put downs, teasing or bullying. zI will work hard each day to grow and learn.

25 2. Character Education Policy zThe touchstone is a creed or “way” that expresses the shared values and aspirations of all members of the school community. – Tom Lickona, zOnce a Kennerly kid, always a Kennerly kid. zAt Slavens we take the high road. zThe Learning Place where Dreams are born (6th grade); Caring is shown (7th grade); Leaders are made (8th grade) High Five 5th grade student Danielle Garrett explained “High Five” in this way: “The letters do not stand for words, but it means everyone being respectful, peaceful, safe, and working with other people cooperatively.” — Lee-Hamilton Elementary, Ferguson- Florissant District, St. Louis, MO

26 zStudents at Wyaconda Elementary created their vision for the school on Dream Day 2. Character Education Policy

27 Promotes core ethical values Defines in thinking, feeling, behavior Compre- hensive; intentional; proactive Creates caring schools Promotes moral action Academic Curriculum Develops self- motivation Staff is a learning, moral community Fosters shared moral leadership Engages family & community Assesses character of school Commty Participtn. Char Ed Policy Dream Day Traits Identified Integrated Curriculum Experientl. Learning Evaluation Adult Role Models Staff Develpmt. Student Leadershp Sustaining Culture Gridlock

28 3. Identified & Defined Traits –Parents, teachers and community representatives agree on which character traits to emphasize and what definitions to use. –Developing consensus on the definitions is key and the early involvement of students enriches the process. –Once the traits are defined, they should be highly visible throughout the school and community.

29 3. Identified & Defined Traits RESPECT zShowing regard for self, others, property, and those in authority. – Belleville #118 District zTreating self, others, and property with value. – Troy District zShowing care and concern for: yourself, people and things in your community, the environment. –Clayton District z(Respeto): Treating others as you wish to be treated. – Pattonville zHelpful hands, not hurtful hands (with hand signals for both). –Sullivan Primary School

30 3. Identified & Defined Traits Respect zPhase 1: begin to understand that respect is a feeling or an attitude towards other people, things and the world around them. zPhase 2: demonstrates an evolving understanding of respect towards others and the environment and show tolerance of difference. zPhase 3: strive to be active compassionate and empathetic learners who demonstrate care for the environment and understand that other people, with their differences can also be right. zPhase 4: act and interact as inquiring, knowledgeable and caring people who create a better and more peaceful world through environmental responsibility, intercultural understanding and respect. zFiona Zinn, Geelong Grammar School, 3 – 12 year olds, Corio, Australia

31 3. Identified & Defined Traits Reconnecting with your Character Traits

32 4. Integrated Curriculum yCharacter Education is an integral part of the curriculum at all grade levels. Character traits are connected to classroom lessons so students see how a trait might figure into a story, be part of a science experiment, or how it might affect them. These traits are part of the instruction of the day—in every class and every subject.

33 4. It is integration if… yIt defines the trait or characteristic yIt connects the trait to one’s xThinking process xIntention xChoices xActions xPatterns of choices/actions over a lifetime yIt increases autonomy, belonging, and competence yIntegration can be about what you teach (content) yAnd about how you teach (context)

34 4. It is integration if… y Some strategies that integrate character education into daily learning xInquiry xReflection xJournaling xClass meetings; Socratic Seminar xCooperative learning xService learning xEthical decision-making xPeer editing and caring peer critiques

35 5. Experiential Learning –Students are given many opportunities to experience character traits and express them in action. Ample time is also allowed for discussion and reflection.. –Service Learning –Class Meetings –Buddies, mentors –Cooperative learning –Peer tutors, teachers, mediators –Democratic/Representative student government

36 Experiential Learning Class Meetings Benefits of Class Meetings –Build teacher-student and peer relationships within the classroom –Provide students with a forum, a structure and practice in voicing their thoughts –Create a cohesive caring and reflective classroom climate –Teach goal setting, planning, decision-making, problem-solving and reflection skills –Teach the importance of fairness, kindness and responsibility

37 Class Meetings with Dr. Marvin Berkowitz March 3, 2009 Moral Dilemma Discussions March 31, 2009

38 Experiential Learning Buddies

39 Experiential Learning Representative Government & Empowered Councils

40 5. Experiential Learning

41 Peace Ball Activity Celebrations “Programs & Services” Peace Ball

42 6. Evaluation –The character education initiative is evaluated on a regular basis to determine if it is achieving the anticipated results and to validate that the processes and structures being implemented are working. Evaluation results become the basis of data-driven planning.

43 7. Adult Role Models –Children “learn what they live” so it is important that all adults in the school community who interact with children on a daily basis demonstrate positive character traits at home, school and in the community. –Adults need to reflect and focus on important character traits and how to model them systematically and intentionally. –If adults do not model the behavior they teach, the entire program will fail.

44 7. Adult Role Models

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47 Promotes core ethical values Defines in thinking, feeling, behavior Compre- hensive; intentional; proactive Creates caring schools Promotes moral action Academic Curriculum Develops self- motivation Staff is a learning, moral community Fosters shared moral leadership Engages family & community Assesses character of school Commty Participtn. Char Ed Policy Traits Identified Integrated Curriculum Experientl. Learning Evaluation Adult Role Models Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Nike Bus Drivers WHEELS Staff Develpmt. Student Leadershp Sustaining Culture Gridlock

48 8. Staff Development –Significant time and resources are allocated for staff development activities so that staff can create and implement character education on an ongoing basis. –Time for discussion and understanding of both the process and the programs, as well as for creation of curriculum and lesson plans, is an important part of training activities.

49 8. Staff Development –CHARACTERplus National Speakers Series –CHARACTERplus Certification in Character Ed –CHARACTERplus Advanced Trainings –Leadership Academy in Character Education –Character Education Conference –www.characterplus.org

50 9. Student involvement & leadership –Students are involved in age-appropriate activities and allowed to connect character education to their learning, decision-making and personal goals.

51 9. Student involvement & leadership

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53 Why invest time an effort into equipping every child with leadership skills? zBecause leadership is accountability. zLeadership is trust. zLeadership is inspiration. zLeadership is competence. zLeadership is purpose. zLeadership is setting an example. --”Growing Young Leaders” by Cynthia Georges CHARACTERplus September Principal’s Newsletter

54 Barbara Lewis Author of The Kid’s Guide to Social Action The Teen Guide to Global Action What Do You Stand For? Tuesday, October 13, a.m. – 3 p.m.

55 Promotes core ethical values Defines in thinking, feeling, behavior Compre- hensive; intentional; proactive Creates caring schools Promotes moral action Academic Curriculum Develops self- motivation Staff is a learning, moral community Fosters shared moral leadership Engages family & community Assesses character of school Commty Participtn. Char Ed Policy Traits Identified Integrated Curriculum Experientl. Learning Evaluation Adult Role Models Staff Develpmt. Student Leadershp Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Ridgewd Character Council Sustaining Culture Gridlock

56 10. Sustaining the process –The character education program is sustained and renewed through implementation of the first nine essential elements, with particular attention to: a high level of commitment from the top; adequate funding; support for district coordination staff; high- quality and ongoing professional development; and a networking and support system for teachers who are implementing the program.


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