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STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT STUDENT DEVELOPMENT: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE.

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Presentation on theme: "STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT STUDENT DEVELOPMENT: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE."— Presentation transcript:

1 STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT STUDENT DEVELOPMENT: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

2 Learning Outcomes Review specific student development theory used throughout Student Affairs/Enrollment management to ensure our professional staff are on the same level of thoughtReview specific student development theory used throughout Student Affairs/Enrollment management to ensure our professional staff are on the same level of thought We will discuss Maslow, Perry, Chickering, Atkinson/Morton/Sue, Kolb, and Tinto/SwailWe will discuss Maslow, Perry, Chickering, Atkinson/Morton/Sue, Kolb, and Tinto/Swail Discuss ways in which identified theories are used in various units throughout the division (putting theory to practice)Discuss ways in which identified theories are used in various units throughout the division (putting theory to practice) Identify theories or theorists we would like to discuss in future meetingsIdentify theories or theorists we would like to discuss in future meetings

3 MASLOW

4 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Meeting deficiency needsMeeting deficiency needs Physiological, Safety, Love/Belonging, EsteemPhysiological, Safety, Love/Belonging, Esteem Helping students meet or understand their full potentialHelping students meet or understand their full potential Maslow identified “peak experiences” or high points in individuals when the individual is in harmony with herself or her surroundings. Self Actualized individuals have more of these peak momentsMaslow identified “peak experiences” or high points in individuals when the individual is in harmony with herself or her surroundings. Self Actualized individuals have more of these peak moments

5 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Maslow states, “[Self Actualization] describes the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming.”Maslow states, “[Self Actualization] describes the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming.”

6 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (1943)

7 HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY?

8 PERRY Born: 1946 Died: 1998 Fields: Psychology Institution: Harvard Known for: College Student Intellectual Development William G. Perry

9 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Focused on student intellectual development and addresses some of the cognitive and emotional needs of our students (to challenge them to nurture their growth)Focused on student intellectual development and addresses some of the cognitive and emotional needs of our students (to challenge them to nurture their growth) Perry had a “fateful curiosity about the ways in which so many of [his] students succeeded in not learning that which [he] was teaching them so well.”Perry had a “fateful curiosity about the ways in which so many of [his] students succeeded in not learning that which [he] was teaching them so well.” Identified strategies to help students move through the levels he labeled:Identified strategies to help students move through the levels he labeled: Provide appropriate balance of challenge and supportProvide appropriate balance of challenge and support Assign open-ended real world problemsAssign open-ended real world problems Small group work exposes them to multiple ideasSmall group work exposes them to multiple ideas Model the type of thinking being soughtModel the type of thinking being sought Provide supportive feedback with respect at all levelsProvide supportive feedback with respect at all levels

10 STAGES OF INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT

11

12 HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY?

13 CHICKERING Fields: Education Institutions: Wesleyan University, Harvard, Columbia Known for: Identify Development models for College Aged Students Arthur Chickering

14 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Chickering focused most of his work on college aged students and focused primarily on identity developmentChickering focused most of his work on college aged students and focused primarily on identity development Vectors were stages (not necessarily linear but progressive in nature)Vectors were stages (not necessarily linear but progressive in nature) The vectors help identify student and faculty/staff relationship needs as well as the role of the student within communitiesThe vectors help identify student and faculty/staff relationship needs as well as the role of the student within communities

15 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Chickering argued that educational environments exert powerful influences on student development:Chickering argued that educational environments exert powerful influences on student development: Institutional objectives—consistency in goals, messages, policies, programs, etcInstitutional objectives—consistency in goals, messages, policies, programs, etc Institutional size—connectedness with student life and satisfaction with the college experienceInstitutional size—connectedness with student life and satisfaction with the college experience Student/Faculty/Staff relationshipsStudent/Faculty/Staff relationships Curriculum—meets diverse perspectives; process of learning is just as important as curricular contentCurriculum—meets diverse perspectives; process of learning is just as important as curricular content Teaching—active learningTeaching—active learning Friendships and Communities—diverse and interactionFriendships and Communities—diverse and interaction Student Development programs and services— recommends that administrators of student programs and services redefine themselves as educators.Student Development programs and services— recommends that administrators of student programs and services redefine themselves as educators.

16 Seven Vectors of Psychosocial Development in College Students Seven Vectors of Psychosocial Development in College Students

17 ANOTHER IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT THEORY

18 Minority Identity Development Atkinson, D.R. Morten, G. & Sue, D.W. (Editors) (1998). Counseling American Minorities: A Cross Cultural Perspective (5th Edition). McGraw. Hill Company.

19 HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY?

20 KOLB Born: 1939 Fields: Philosophy Institutions: Knox College, Harvard Known for: Theory of Experiential Learning David Kolb

21 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING “Experiential Learning” addresses different learning styles, thereby enhancing our ability to provide appropriate challenge and support“Experiential Learning” addresses different learning styles, thereby enhancing our ability to provide appropriate challenge and support Learning styles defined as a habitual way of responding to a learning environmentLearning styles defined as a habitual way of responding to a learning environment Four stage processFour stage process Concrete Experience (feeling)Concrete Experience (feeling) Reflective Observation (watching)Reflective Observation (watching) Abstract Conceptualization (thinking)Abstract Conceptualization (thinking) Active Experimentation (doing)Active Experimentation (doing)

22 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Group based applications (we don’t think in a vacuum and the differing thoughts or diversity of groups will create more effective learning)Group based applications (we don’t think in a vacuum and the differing thoughts or diversity of groups will create more effective learning) Kolb Theory is often compared to a counseling model— open minded to a client without bias; observe the client and reflect; theories or hypothesis are formed based on reflection; test hypothesis by intervening or not; experience consequences and start over.Kolb Theory is often compared to a counseling model— open minded to a client without bias; observe the client and reflect; theories or hypothesis are formed based on reflection; test hypothesis by intervening or not; experience consequences and start over. His theory has staffing implications as well (Strengths Quest thought)His theory has staffing implications as well (Strengths Quest thought)

23 EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

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25 ANOTHER STUDENT DEVELOPMENT THEORY: A Curriculum Model

26 Framework for a Student Development Curriculum Model: Outcome Ranks of Fifty-Four Educational Programming Topics by Developmental Dimension

27 HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY?

28 TINTO Fields: Education, Sociology, Philosophy Institutions: Fordham University, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, The University of Chicago, Syracuse University Known for: Retention Theory Vincent Tinto

29 Tinto’s Student Integration Model

30 Swail’s Geometric Model of Student Persistence and Achievement Academic Rigor Quality of Learning Aptitude Content Knowledge Critical Thinking Ability Technology Ability Study Skills Learning Skills Time Management Academic-related extracurricular activities Financial Issues Educational Legacy Attitude toward learning Religious Background Maturity Social Coping Skills Communication Skills Attitude toward others Cultural Values Expectations Goal commitment Family Influence Peer Influence Social Lifestyle Financial Aid, Academic Services, Student Services, Recruitment and Admissions, and Curriculum and Instruction Swail, Redd, and Perna, (2003)

31 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING “Researchers describe many reasons for leaving college as well as student characteristics of non-persisters. According to Tinto, academic reasons represent only 20-30% of all college leavers nationally [in the US]. The remaining 70-80% of students who are not retained leave for the following reasons: (1993)“Researchers describe many reasons for leaving college as well as student characteristics of non-persisters. According to Tinto, academic reasons represent only 20-30% of all college leavers nationally [in the US]. The remaining 70-80% of students who are not retained leave for the following reasons: (1993) AdjustmentAdjustment GoalsGoals CommitmentCommitment FinancesFinances Integration and community membershipIntegration and community membership IncongruenceIncongruence IsolationIsolation

32 POINTS OF UNDERSTANDING Tinto (1993)—Persistence to graduation and departure are directly influenced by institutional commitment (motivation to graduate from a specific institution) and goal commitment (motivation to earn a college degree). Tinto (1993)—Persistence to graduation and departure are directly influenced by institutional commitment (motivation to graduate from a specific institution) and goal commitment (motivation to earn a college degree). “Tinto (1993), in highlighting the importance of institutional ‘fit,’ focused student affairs practitioners’ attention on what they could do to help the transition between membership in one of many communities on campus.” “Tinto (1993), in highlighting the importance of institutional ‘fit,’ focused student affairs practitioners’ attention on what they could do to help the transition between membership in one of many communities on campus.”

33 HOW DOES THIS APPLY TO YOU OR YOUR AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY?

34 FINAL THOUGHTS

35 What are some theorists that you identify in your areas that we can all learn?What are some theorists that you identify in your areas that we can all learn? What do we do with this information?What do we do with this information? Putting Theory To PracticePutting Theory To Practice WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?


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