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© Centre for Experiential Education Quality assessment & assurance and the new paradigms in education EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Ferre Laevers – Julia Moons.

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Presentation on theme: "© Centre for Experiential Education Quality assessment & assurance and the new paradigms in education EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Ferre Laevers – Julia Moons."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Centre for Experiential Education Quality assessment & assurance and the new paradigms in education EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION Ferre Laevers – Julia Moons Centre for Experiential Education University of Leuven - Belgium

2 © Centre for Experiential Education Beyond the process: how outcome can guide practice Theme 1

3 © Centre for Experiential Education OUTPUT objectives outcomes  competencies Quality at the level of the output CONTEXT means principles PROCESS

4 © Centre for Experiential Education  EFFECTS objectives outcomes Emotional health / self-esteem  Exploratory drive  Competencies & life skills  The basic attitude of linkedness 

5 © Centre for Experiential Education The new paradigm: ‘competency based learning’ The output of education questioned The output of education questioned Competencies are life-skills Competencies are life-skills not the learning is the point, but how to use it not the learning is the point, but how to use it

6 © Centre for Experiential Education “Here is a parcel that has to be developed as a parking place for a supermarket. Design a layout for this section that allows a maximum of cars to be parked.” Tackling complex situations

7 © Centre for Experiential Education How long is the hallway?

8 © Centre for Experiential Education The new paradigm: ‘competency based education’ The output of education questioned The output of education questioned Competencies are life-skills Competencies are life-skills not the learning is the point, but how to use it not the learning is the point, but how to use it Competencies are complex entities Competencies are complex entities Integrate skills, insights, attitudes, praxis Bloom’s taxonomy revisited Bloom’s taxonomy revisited [from reproductive learning to problem solving & evaluation] The multiple intelligences The multiple intelligences The concept of ‘implicit learning’ The concept of ‘implicit learning’

9 © Centre for Experiential Education The new paradigm: ‘competency based learning’ ‘Stealth education’ & computer games ‘Stealth education’ & computer games Will the education system be bypassed ?

10 © Centre for Experiential Education HOW CAN WE CHANGE THE PROGRAM INSTEAD OF ADDING NEW FILES AGAIN AND AGAIN? HOW CAN WE CHANGE THE PROGRAM INSTEAD OF ADDING NEW FILES AGAIN AND AGAIN? The key question

11 © Centre for Experiential Education Reality Mental schemes

12 © Centre for Experiential Education Developmental domains Gross motor development Gross motor development Fine motor development Fine motor development Expression through arts Expression through arts Expression through language Expression through language Understanding the world of objects Understanding the world of objects –Including technology Understanding the world of people Understanding the world of people –Including social competence Logical mathematical competence Logical mathematical competence Self-organisation & entrepreneurship Self-organisation & entrepreneurship

13 © Centre for Experiential Education Shows excellent physical skills for his/her age, demonstrated in a broad range of situations where movement is required. It is a pleasure observing his/her movements in space: supple and graceful, purposeful and with efficacy, in an adjusted pace, rhythmical, readily reacting to changes and signals. Picks up new patterns of movement very easily. [Process-oriented child monitoring system] Gross motor development [level 5] 1

14 © Centre for Experiential Education The concept of ‘deep-level-learning’ An holistic approach An holistic approach far from a checklist of isolated skills far from a checklist of isolated skills grasping the essence grasping the essence covering all age levels covering all age levels

15 © Centre for Experiential Education Is very skilful in handling objects and tools: is able to perform complex operations fluently and with precision. Masters a broad range of manipulations. Has an excellent co-ordination of hand and fingers, detached from the rest of the body. Easily picks up new patterns of movement. [Process-oriented child monitoring system] Fine motor development [level 5] 2

16 © Centre for Experiential Education The concept of ‘deep-level-learning’ An holistic approach An holistic approach far from a checklist of isolated skills far from a checklist of isolated skills grasping the essence grasping the essence covering all age levels covering all age levels speaks to the imagination speaks to the imagination gives a sense of direction gives a sense of direction a source of inspiration for the creation of a powerful learning environment a source of inspiration for the creation of a powerful learning environment

17 © Centre for Experiential Education Blackboard REFLECTION: identify the developmental domains adressed in this activity (the cognitive load)

18 © Centre for Experiential Education Developmental domains Gross motor development Gross motor development Fine motor development Fine motor development Expression through visual arts Expression through visual arts Expression through language Expression through language Understanding the world of objects Understanding the world of objects –Including technology Understanding the world of people Understanding the world of people –Including social competence Logical mathematical competence Logical mathematical competence Self-organisation & entrepreneurship Self-organisation & entrepreneurship

19 © Centre for Experiential Education De fluteplayers

20 © Centre for Experiential Education Is able to manage him/herself well: knows what (s)he wants, can set goals, can engage into action without delay and achieve a good result. Does not give up at the first obstacle and can persist. Can step back and work strategically. Is able to exploit various possibilities and adapt to changing circumstances. Is not ruled by the surroundings, but actively determines the group’s course together with others. Self-organisation & entrepreneurship [level 5] 3

21 © Centre for Experiential Education Self-organisation Self-organisation is the ability to manage oneself and reach the highest possible quality of life by exploiting the available possibilities which are present in ones surroundings. This competency contains (1) will-power (being able to commit oneself), (2) being able to make choices and set goals, (3) thinking up scenarios for actions and executing them and (4) being able to step back. …the art of living

22 © Centre for Experiential Education Clay REFLECTION: identify the developmental domains adressed in this activity (the cognitive load)

23 © Centre for Experiential Education

24 Developmental domains Gross motor development Gross motor development Fine motor development Fine motor development Expression through visual arts Expression through visual arts Expression through language Expression through language Understanding the world of objects Understanding the world of objects –Including technology Understanding the world of people Understanding the world of people –Including social competence Logical mathematical competence Logical mathematical competence Self-organisation & entrepreneurship Self-organisation & entrepreneurship

25 © Centre for Experiential Education Make every developmental domain in a powerful way represented in the learning environment for every and each child

26 © Centre for Experiential Education The concept of ‘deep-level-learning’ An holistic approach An holistic approach Valuing the ‘intuitive intelligence’ Valuing the ‘intuitive intelligence’ results on maths at the age of 13 results on maths at the age of 13

27 © Centre for Experiential Education

28 Who are the best engineers?

29 © Centre for Experiential Education Policy with regard to output [1] Help teachers to grasp the essence of the Help teachers to grasp the essence of the developmental domains [capacity building] developmental domains [capacity building] Make accountable for ‘effort’ not for ‘outcome’ Make accountable for ‘effort’ not for ‘outcome’ are all developmental domains represented in children’s activities? are all developmental domains represented in children’s activities? is the level of involvement sufficient to expect deep level learning? is the level of involvement sufficient to expect deep level learning? Develop a positive approach to evaluation in settings and schools: valuing talents Develop a positive approach to evaluation in settings and schools: valuing talents

30 © Centre for Experiential Education Baby tubs REFLECTION: identify the developmental domains adressed in this activity (the cognitive load)

31 © Centre for Experiential Education Policy with regard to output [2] Use ‘national’ testing for inspiring feedback Use ‘national’ testing for inspiring feedback periodic sounding testing [on a large sample] periodic sounding testing [on a large sample] the broad range of capacities the broad range of capacities emotional health / exploratory drive / belonging emotional health / exploratory drive / belonging life skills: social competence / entrepreneurship life skills: social competence / entrepreneurship Invest in educational research in which a variety of models are developed and tested Invest in educational research in which a variety of models are developed and tested comparative study of models comparative study of models in a pre- and posttest design in a pre- and posttest design

32 © Centre for Experiential Education Developing an effective strategy for quality improvement Theme 2

33 © Centre for Experiential Education INVOLVEMENT QUALITY IN CARE AND EDUCATION PROCESS WELL-BEING  CONTEXT means principles EFFECTS objectives outcomes

34 © Centre for Experiential Education The Leuven experience [Project funded by Kind & Gezin]…

35 © Centre for Experiential Education

36 CONTEXT FACTORS Well-being Involvement CIRCOMSTANTIAL FACTORS IN THE CHILD Group climate Adult style Room for initiative Offer of activities Organisa- tion

37 © Centre for Experiential Education Results [1]  how much well-being? Mean3.61SCORENumberofChildren% L M H Low Mode- rate High

38 © Centre for Experiential Education What should we get at least? 50 % of the learners Score3Score4 Mean score = 3.5

39 © Centre for Experiential Education Results [2]  how much involvement? Mean3.29SCORENumberofChildren% L M H Low Mode- rate High

40 © Centre for Experiential Education Results [3]  variation in involvement Mean score for involvement at the level of the setting [total: 389] 2,0 to 2,49 2,5 to 2,99 3,0 to 3,49 3,5 to 3,99 4,0 to 4,49 4,5 and more N % LowerversusHigher

41 © Centre for Experiential Education

42 Very low Low Moderate 21 classes, 5 half days observation in a year (100 episodes per class) [Research project Equal Opportunities]

43 © Centre for Experiential Education Evolution in WB and INV [Ester] Ester

44 © Centre for Experiential Education The status of the process variables A measure for the POWER of the learning environment – NOT a child characteristic A measure for the POWER of the learning environment – NOT a child characteristic Contain key information to improve quality Contain key information to improve quality immediate feedback the shortest way to interventions tell who takes advantage of our efforts and who doesn’t Stand above any educational model / innovation Stand above any educational model / innovation A common base for the entire educational system A common base for the entire educational system  why not install a follow up system from 0 to 18 yrs?

45 Learning Together Advisory Service Kent Empowering early years practitioners to improve the quality of provision Colleen Marin

46 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Context: Public Service Agreement (PSA) “To promote the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of young children so that they flourish at home and at school.”

47 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Public Service Agreement Target 1) To improve the outcomes for children

48 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Public Service Agreement Target 2) Reduce the outcomes gap between the areas of high social deprivation and the rest of Kent

49 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Settings Involved  175 settings in total in the 3 areas  68% took part voluntarily  119 settings in total  2,081 children

50 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Training & Implementation of Project  All advisers were trained on use of Leuven system  All settings received 4 sessions of Leuven training  All settings received: Leuven handbook, Video of Ten Action Points, Box Full of Feelings and a pack of 20 children’s books which supported exploration of feelings

51 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Notes of Visit  Advisers reported against the 10 Action Points  Advisers and practitioners discussed and agreed what impact the work had on children’s learning and development

52 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together

53 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together The 10 Action Points Create a rich environment  Offer activities based on observation  Stimulate activities with open impulses  Give room for child initiative  Build up positive relations  Explore the world of feelings,  behaviour & values Support children with special needs 

54 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Action Points 1 & 2  Rearrange the classroom into appealing corners/areas  Check the content of the corners and replace unattractive materials with more appealing ones Example of Results  86% of settings have rearranged the home or drama area  73% create clearly defined play areas  68% have rearranged the writing and book area  50% reflect upon the location of the play areas and initiatives to gain space in the setting  36% have made indoor and outdoor play available at the same time

55 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Action Point 6  Widen the possibilities for free initiative and support them with sound rules and agreements  59% have improved free access to materials  41% of settings have child initiated time for 2/3 of the day  45% make rules and agreements concrete for children via the use of pictograms etc  18.2% make the rules together with the children

56 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Action Points 9 & 10  Identify children with emotional problems and work out sustaining interventions  Identify children with developmental needs and work out interventions that engender involvement within the problem area  91% of settings have used the Leuven scales for well being and involvement  82% make specific interventions for children with Special Needs  55% involve external agencies

57 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Process & Outcomes  73% of settings: Leuven work has impacted positively on levels of involvement  41% of settings: children more independent than before  64% of settings: the whole staff team has been trained on Leuven work

58 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Conclusions  Practitioners are more aware of the impact of the environment on children’s play.  They proactively review and change the environment as a result of observations of children’s well being and involvement.  Some settings have made the shift from a practitioner orientated to a child orientated way of oganising things.

59 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Conclusion Making efforts to observe children’s levels of well-being and involvement and putting the Ten Action points in place Enables practitioners to make fundamental changes towards improvements in the quality of provision for children

60 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Audit of 730 PVI settings  Use of Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS)

61 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together ECERS-R ECERS - R AVERAGES Difference Kent Discovery Nursery Ltd - Dover Parents & Staff Programme StructureInteractionActivities Language - Reasoning Personal Care Routines Space & Furnishings

62 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together ECERS-E ECERS - E AVERAGES Difference Kent Discovery Nursery Ltd - Dover DiversityScience Maths Literacy

63 Advisory Service Kent Learning Together Ofsted 2006 ‘Staff have re-arranged the nursery and resources to support children’s learning, allow them to use their initiative and select freely and independently from a wide selection of purposeful and meaningful activities appropriate to their individual needs’.

64 © Centre for Experiential Education What are the success factors? Sound strategy: Sound strategy: –Inclusiveness: all advisers participate –The whole team included even if only one group is part of the sample –Empowering attitude of advisers: they believe and support “It’s Leuven” [the ‘process-oriented approach’ offers a framework to act and be successful] “It’s Leuven” [the ‘process-oriented approach’ offers a framework to act and be successful]

65 © Centre for Experiential Education Questions and discussion Theme 3

66 © Centre for Experiential Education INFORMATION on Experiential Education

67 © Centre for Experiential Education Publications  The Leuven Involvement Scale: Training Pack [Video + Manual 29 fragments]  Enhancing Well-being and involvement: The ten Action Points [100 slides + voice over]  A Box full of Feelings [play&learn-set]  Experiential Education at Work [Video of Julia‘s class + guide]  The Process-Oriented Child Monitoring System [Manual + Forms + Interventions]  Research on Experiential Education [Reader including 5 articles]

68 © Centre for Experiential Education Beyond free initiative: the role of the practitioner Theme x

69 © Centre for Experiential Education Quality in education  CONTEXT means principles ingredients of a powerful learning environment

70 A powerful learning environment The constructivist approach The OECD meeting on ECE [Stockholm 2003] High Scope [1962] High Scope [1962] Reggio Emilia [1970] Reggio Emilia [1970] Te Whaariki [1996] Te Whaariki [1996] Experiential Education [1976] Experiential Education [1976]

71 © Centre for Experiential Education Basic ingredients ➊ Respect of the child ➋ Communication, a positive group climate

72 © Centre for Experiential Education Basic ingredients ➊ Respect of the child ➋ Communication, a positive group climate [cooperative learning/diversity as asset] ➌ A rich environment

73 © Centre for Experiential Education A rich environment: “densification”! How broad is the range of experiences? How broad is the range of experiences? From sensory to abstract From sensory to abstract From individual to social From individual to social From ‘taking in’ to ‘creating’ From ‘taking in’ to ‘creating’ How much is still open to exploration? How much is still open to exploration? Depth, surprise, adventure, serendipity Depth, surprise, adventure, serendipity Make the soup thicker…

74 © Centre for Experiential Education Basic ingredients ➊ Respect of the child ➋ Communication, a positive group climate ➌ A rich environment ➍ An open framework-approach

75 © Centre for Experiential Education The ‘open framework’ approach Programmed learning Custodial Open framework Child- oriented Initiative of the adult Initiative of the child

76 © Centre for Experiential Education What is it in practice? A circular process A circular process –Who is programming who? [iron] –Who is learning most? Give room for child initiative and do not Give room for child initiative and do not Offer activities that meet observed Offer activities that meet observed Interests [Action point 4] The ‘emergent curriculum’ The ‘emergent curriculum’

77 © Centre for Experiential Education 77 OBSERVE CHILDREN & OFFER ACTIVITIES THAT MEET THEIR INTERESTS  Isabel  Thomas Milan Jonas Throwing with corn The pebbles

78 © Centre for Experiential Education 78 OBSERVE CHILDREN & OFFER ACTIVITIES THAT MEET THEIR INTERESTS  rich environment as starting point  identify what is really meaningful  find activities that match these interests  let one activity grow out of the other  have more than one project at the time

79 © Centre for Experiential Education Basic ingredients ➊ Respect of the child ➋ Communication, a positive group climate ➌ A rich environment ➍ An open framework-approach ➎ Representation: ‘ impression-expression’ cycle

80 © Centre for Experiential Education Mental representation Symbols and signs Perceptions and actions Understanding Expression The concept of representation The concept of representation

81 © Centre for Experiential Education To express is to impress (Gendlin) To express is to impress (Gendlin) SYMBOL Unexpressed Expressed

82 © Centre for Experiential Education Basic ingredients ➊ Respect of the child ➋ Communication, a positive group climate ➌ A rich environment ➍ An open framework-approach ➎ Representation: ‘ impression-expression’ cycle ➏ Observation, observation, observation…

83  find a consensus around the criteria ‘wellbeing’ and ‘involvement’  start where you are and accept the limitations sselect a relevant field of action WWhen and where?  take initiatives that are promising  reflect: why did it work/why not?  share your experiences & celebrate How to get there?


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