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MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, 25.9. – 1.10.2011 1 510978-TEMPUS-1-2010-1 This project has.

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Presentation on theme: "MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, 25.9. – 1.10.2011 1 510978-TEMPUS-1-2010-1 This project has."— Presentation transcript:

1 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Module 2: Cartography and Geovisualization Map Design By: Aizhan Assylbekova, PhD Cartography and Geoinformatics Department, KazNU Al-Farabi 16 August 2012 Hungary, August 2012

2 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Objectives  The main components, or building blocks, of a map  The qualities of a map that are important in communicating information to map users  The types of maps that can be developed to visually and quickly communicate information to an audience Description 2 Hungary, August 2012

3 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. The objective(s) of the map (the message) The people who may use the map (the audience) The data that will be displayed in the map (the info rmation available) The use of graphics software for displaying map information The final format of the printed or digital version of the map (the product) 3 Hungary, August 2012 Mapmakers need to understand…

4 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Bibliography M.J. Kraak and F. Ormeling (2009): Cartography: Visualization of Spatial Data. Prentice Hall T. Slocum (2003): Thematic Cartography and Geographic Visualization. Prentice Hall. Teaching and learning methods Lectures, lab work, self-study on articles in magazines Required infrastructure Class room with computer projector, computer laboratory with GIS software and data Assessment To pass this module, the students are required to complete all exercises; successfully present the final project and pass the written exam 4 Hungary, August 2012

5 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Map components Symbology Direction Scale Legend Locational inset Neatline Typography Color and contrast Ancillary information (caveats and disclaimers) 5 Hungary, August 2012

6 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Symbology 6 The art of expression Using graphics and text to convey meaning Most GIS packages offer a robust suite of symbology choices Hungary, August 2012

7 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Scale 7  The representation of map figures to their on the ground equivalents  A key part of most maps  Several different approaches  Graphical  Equivalent  Proportional Hungary, August 2012

8 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Color and contrast People associate colors of mapped features with events, emotions, and socio-economic status Although men and women react similarly to color, some reactions may vary depending on culture (Valdez & Mehrabin 1994) How do you react to different colors? Hungary, August 2012

9 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Cyan, Magenta, Yellow -Subtractive colors The most popular colour schemes CMYK Red, Green, Blue - Additive colors samF2GU7p6QXxvKrdpn11A.jpg Hungary, August 2012

10 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Classification of map symbols Hungary, August 2012

11 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Text Hungary, August 2012

12 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Annotation Hungary, August 2012

13 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. What should be on your map? Audience- are they all familiar with your study area? Is an inset required? Will others need to track your sources ? Do you need to record where the map is stored? Are revisions expected or will the study area change (date)? Title, scale, author, and north arrow are safe bets Publication outlets may have their own guidelines Hungary, August 2012

14 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Common map problems Wrong audience Omitting a necessary element Too much clutter (symbology) Too much detail (annotation) Plotter or printer produces something different than what you see on the screen Hungary, August 2012

15 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Cartographer Responsibility How to Lie with Maps (Monmonier 1996) Drawing the Line, Tales of Maps and Controversy (Monmonier 1995) Models of reality Many simply accept maps at face value Be discriminate in your appraisal and interpretation of maps Be clear and ethical in your creation of maps Hungary, August 2012

16 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Map composition PROBABILISTIC MAP OF SEISMIC RISK Map from Atlas of natural and technological hazards and risks of emergencies in the Republic of Kazakhstan (2010) Hungary, August 2012

17 MSc in Geoinformatics – Managing Energy, Resources, Environment Teacher Training Dushanbe, – TEMPUS This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This document reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Hungary, August 2012 Questions???


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