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Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Engineering Classrooms Before and After Innovation David Cordes, University.

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Presentation on theme: "Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Engineering Classrooms Before and After Innovation David Cordes, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Engineering Classrooms Before and After Innovation David Cordes, University of Alabama, Jeff Froyd, Texas A&M University,

2 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Workshop Overview Introduction (20 min) –Guidelines, what is an “innovative classroom”? What Other Institutions Have Done (25 min) –Information dump Classroom Transformation (30 min) –What do you do? How do you do this? Other Issues and Considerations (20 min) –Items that can impact potential changes Wrap-up (5 min)

3 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Introduction: Basic Guidelines Will operate in a team-based mode –The group knows more than any one person Interrupt frequently –No pre-defined set of material that “must” be covered in this workshop When looking at innovative classrooms, we will focus on –The use of technology in the classroom –Lower-division engineering courses

4 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Introduction: Share information Within your group: discuss the following question among yourselves What is an innovative classroom? (and could you recognize one if you saw it) Appoint a reporter to capture group results

5 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 An innovative classroom is... Needs to accommodate a diversity of teaching styles Multi-media equipped PCs (functional) at every desk, for every student Hardware in the classroom (demonstration hardware) Flexible in setup (able to be re-arranged) Appropriate environment – seating (recliners), acoustical, quick escape pod for the teacher Internet connectivity Follows good design practices for classroom – good viewing angles, environmental controls, etc. Projectors for the PC, Elmo, etc. (multi-media) Virtual lab tools

6 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Is this an innovative classroom? NO – difficulty with sight angles, temperature control YES – multi-media presentation, broken up in non-traditional seating arrangements YES – we confirmed that YES – same reasons NO – inadequate resources, poor acoustics Plants are nice

7 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Part 2: What others have done Short (~25 minute) information dump Background Information – one-page introduction to technology-enabled learning Representative Foundation Coalition efforts –Arizona State University –Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology –Texas A&M University –University of Alabama –University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth Other sample initiatives –Drexel’s EE laboratories –RPI’s studio model

8 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 New Classroom Environments

9 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Arizona State University Philosophy –College focus on technology in classrooms, different classrooms for different needs, faculty training essential Classroom layout & equipment –Hold 40 to 80 students, team-based seating, instructor has ability to project student work on main screens Software & Applications –Wide variety, different rooms have different packages, all information available via the Internet Audience –All fundamental engineering courses

10 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Arizona State University Sample ASU Classroom

11 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Rose-Hulman Institute of Tech Philosophy –Completely networked campus environment Classroom layout & equipment –Every student purchases a notebook computer as an entering student (model is specified by institution) –Over 20 classrooms have been equipped with network and power connections to support notebook computers Software & Applications –Maple (calculus), Working Model & Maple (dynamics), Physics labs (Excel - data acquisition/analysis) Audience –All engineering students and classes

12 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Texas A&M University Philosophy –Classroom technology must be scalable for large classes (~100) Classroom layout & equipment –Remodeled about 10 classrooms for first-year and sophomore courses –One computer per two students –Departments have constructed their own classrooms, more are planned Software & Applications –Microsoft Office, Maple, AutoCAD, Eng. Equation Solver (EES), Internet –EE has students design, simulate, construct, measure and compare behavior of circuits. Class uses NI hardware and software. Audience –Freshman and sophomore engineering students –Specialized classes in specific disciplines

13 Screen CVLB 319: ENGR 112 Team Layout Sections Screen Windows Podium Doors

14 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 University of Alabama Philosophy –Technology in classrooms, classrooms convenient to students (one new classroom in “engineering dorm”) Classroom layout & equipment –Remodeled six different classrooms –Tables for four, one computer per two students –Departments constructing their own classrooms Software & Applications –Microsoft Office, compilers, FORTRAN, Maple Audience –Freshman engineering students –All students in introductory computing sequence

15 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Alabama Classroom Layout Several classroom formats exist –All have computers at student desks, instructor console, projection system –Primarily used for lower-division classes

16 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth Classroom layout & equipment –Remodeled three classrooms with tables that seat four students and have two computers (48 seats) Software & Applications –Maple and Excel –Based on Studio Physics model (RPI), students perform physics and chemistry experiments in the classroom, acquire, display and analyze data Audience –Freshman & sophomore engineering majors

17 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth IMPULSE Classroom

18 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Studio Classrooms Philosophy – studio environment –Integrate classroom (lecture) with laboratory (experiments, acquire/display/analyze data) Classroom layout & equipment –Tables with two students (one computer) –Student Using computer faces away from instructor Listens to lecture facing away from computer Audience – Mathematics, sciences, engineering students

19 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 RPI Classroom Layout Students face instructor during lecture –Away from computers Student away from instructor when using computers –Instructor can see monitors easily

20 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Drexel Classrooms Laboratory layout & equipment –Laboratory bench for two students (one computer) –Suite of measurement equipment with computer control –First-year and sophomore students Perform experiments and laboratory projects for three hours/week Philosophy –From the start students work with current equipment and explore stimulating physical phenomena Audience –Engineering students

21 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Part 3: Transformation As a team, design your “ideal classroom environment” for the Fall of 2002 –Describe this classroom environment –Describe how your new activities would benefit students and their learning –Describe the resources (besides $$$) that would be required to realize your visions –Select a different reporter from last time

22 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Group Report #1 Ideal Classroom –Laptops required for all students –Wireless high-speed network connection –Uniform software suite –Instructor control over each display in room –Fully integrated lab (including data acquisition) with teaching of facts –Multi-media tools Activities –Set up experiments such that you: teach  perform experiment  process data  reinforce concept –Active learning –Team projects –Design studio Support –I.T. Support –Training (faculty) –Buy-in by faculty/administration –Curriculum re-design

23 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Group Report #2 Hardware –Wireless connectivity –2 students per PC –Flat-screen monitor (flexible arm) –VCR –DVD –Document camera –Wireless microphone –Microphone on each student desk –Internet connectivity –Demo hardware/teaching kit –Satellite –Suitable for distance learning –Web camera

24 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Group Report #3 Activities –Computer Demo –Videotape show –Use Internet –Small bench demo –Wireless Costs –$40K for laptops –$20K for TV & projectors

25 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Group Report #4 Laboratory contains –Computers –Air, gas, water at every other table –Network –Microphone and headphones –Software –Demo equipment –Projector, Elmo system Benefits –Experience each concept –Analyze and store all data –Collaboration

26 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Group Report #5 Features –Capacity of approx. 48 students –12 tables for 4 –Wired for laptops with a wireless network –Multimedia equipment Proxima computer projector installed in the ceiling Mimeo for the whiteboard Sound system DVD/VCR Document camera/Elmo Instructor’s control console –Lighting & environmental controls –White boards Activities: –Team projects, demos, computer instruction, presentation ability Benefits –Enhanced learning capability, more flexible teaching capability

27 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Additional Questions What other questions regarding the use of technology in the classroom need to be addressed? –Ideas regarding technology for distance education –Impact on teaching workloads (and evaluations) –What about student feedback on “value added”? –Using computers in classroom (and exams), what issues arise as a result?

28 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Other Critical Issues Design & Utilization –Rooms available for renovation –Physical layout considerations –Equipment (cost, size, location, power, HV/AC) –Time (often takes more than one summer to build) –Faculty support and education & development –Scheduling of these rooms –Monitoring & after-hours access –Maintenance & upgrade time availability Administrative –Institution’s computing policies –Software licensing –Purchase, replacement & upgrade costs –Support staffing –Clear plan for what inst. is doing with technology –Impact on T&P process –Want to assess results, how to best do this –How to get financial support from State or outside sources?

29 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 Resources Relevant resources –Foundation Coalition –Arizona State University –Texas A&M University –RPI Studio Classroom –Sigma Xi Resources

30 Classroom Innovations Workshop, Tennessee Tech University, November 29 th, 2001 End of workshop Questions?


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