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TLC3 Secondary Level CCSS Training Focus on Inquiry.

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Presentation on theme: "TLC3 Secondary Level CCSS Training Focus on Inquiry."— Presentation transcript:

1 TLC3 Secondary Level CCSS Training Focus on Inquiry

2 Brought to you by the Washington State Library, a Division of the Office of the Secretary of State with funding from the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Special thanks to OSPI and WLMA for their support.

3 Introductions Kristi Bonds NBCTeacher-librarian, Capital High School Olympia School District Craig Seasholes Teacher-Librarian, Sanislo Elementary School Seattle Public Schools YOU?

4 Logistics Restrooms Breaks Standing Partners #tlc3

5 TLC3 Secondary-Level Agenda 9:00 – 9:15Welcome & Review 9:15 – 10:00Question Skills/Research Skills BREAK 10:10 – 11:00Interpreting Visual Data 11:00 – 11:50Analyzing Primary Sources 11:50 – 12:00Resources & Wrap Up

6 The Big Ideas (CCSS introduction, page 7) Demonstrate independence Build strong content knowledge Respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose and discipline Comprehend as well as critique Value evidenceCome to understand other perspectives and cultures Use technology strategically and capably

7 Wordle of CCSS Standards listed on slide 10.

8 What has your building already done with CCSS? Discuss with your table group.

9 librarydoor.blogspot.com Paige Jaeger: Think Tank Library, Libraries Unlimited, Dec Be the Hub of CCSS in your School

10 Task: In pairs, examine one standard for one selected grade. Look for the skills you believe students will need to meet it. Record your observations and be ready to share out with larger group. Path = corestandards.org → Read the Standards → ELA/Literacycorestandards.org Writing 6 (grades 6-12) Writing 7 (grades 6-12) Writing 8 (grades 6-12) Speaking & Listening 5 (grades 6-12) RH 2 (6-8, 9-12) RH 9 (6-8, 9-12) RST 1 (6-8, 9-10, 11-12) RST 7 (6-8, 9-10, 11-12) WHST 7 (6-8, 9-10, 11-12) WHST 8 (6-8, 9-10, 11-12) See example on next slide...

11 Example: Writing Standard, Grade 6, Standard 8 W.6.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. “What do kids need to be able to do?” - locate sources(databases, google searches, print,video) - determine relevancy - evaluate credibility of sources - select quotes (picking the powerful statement) - paraphrase information - draw conclusions - avoid plagiarism - cite information sources -- in-text & bibliography

12 Inquiry Focus #1: Questioning and Research Skills

13 Part 1 - Question Development Remember Levels 1, 2, 3 Questions and DOK Levels from Day Camp? Teaching Channel - Structure Learning w/ Essential QuestionsStructure Learning w/ Essential Questions o Created by students o Core/essential questions are critical for genuine inquiry in their research

14 Teaching Channel - Writing Higher Order Questions

15 Art Costa’s Tiers of Questions (Avid) Level One Questions (Text Explicit) Readers can point to one correct answer right in the text. Words found in these questions include: Who Label What Identify When Match Where Name Which Spell Choose Select Find Restate Level Two Questions (Text Implicit) Readers infer answers from what the text implicitly states, finding answers in several places in the text. Words found in these questions include: analyze group synthesize compare/contrast inferr sequence Level Three Questions (Experience Based) Readers think beyond what the text states. Answers are based on reader’s prior knowledge/experience and will vary. Words found in these questions include: evaluate judge apply a principle speculate imagine predict hypothesize

16 RST Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. Student-generated Essential Questions, using Starters “Which one” questions ask students to collect information and make informed decisions. Instead of asking me to “do a report on Philadelphia,” ask me to decide which city in the Mid-Atlantic region is the best place to live. Instead of “Do a report on AIDS,” ask me which serious disease most deserves research funding. “How” questions ask students to understand problems, to weigh options, perhaps from various points of view, and propose solutions. Instead of asking me to do a report on pollution, ask me to propose a solution to an environmental problem in my neighborhood. Ask me how I would invest a windfall of money.

17 More Starters “What if,” or hypothetical questions ask students to use the knowledge they have to pose a hypothesis and consider options. “What if the Declaration of Independence abolished slavery?” or “What if the Germans hadn’t sunk the Lusitania?” “Should” questions ask students to make moral or practical decision based on evidence. “Should we clone humans?” or “Should we discontinue trade with China?” “Why” questions ask students to understand cause and effect. “Why” helps us understand relationships; it helps us get to the essence of an issue. “Why do people abuse children?” or “Why is the mortality rate higher in one Third World country than another?” (Adapted from: Valenza, Joyce Kasman. “For the Best Answers, Ask Tough Questions.” The Philadelphia Inquirer 19 Apr July )

18 Part 2 - Research Skills Such a complex topic. Perfect for short burst activities Keep activities focused on one part of a standard.

19 Writing 7.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Sample essential question: How are student’s individual right balanced with school safety? ●Evaluate three sources. Choose two and explain why they meet your information needs. Also explain why you didn’t pick the third. ●Website evaluation tools:

20 RST Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. Sample essential question: Which form of alternative energy would you recommend for widespread use in the United States over the next 100 years? Support your claim using at least three credible sources, including a visual representation of data. Public Library – Science in Context, Opposing Viewpoints, etc. Google Advanced Search tips - :gov (filters government sites only).US narrows it to United States only Proquest and eLibrary YouTube

21 Writing 7.7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Sample essential question: What has been the environmental impact of dammed rivers in Washington State? ●Provide the Source: ●Focus Skill: In-text Citations citationmachine.net, noodletools.com citationmachine.netnoodletools.com Your turn! Develop an inquiry question that supports curriculum in your school. Choose a source and an appropriate note taking format.

22 Carousel the Short Burst Shift Four Posters: ●Short Burst Research Ideas ●Shifting to Inquiry with Kids and Teachers ●Stumbling Blocks and Obstacles ●Aha’s and Enhancements for your Program

23 Carousel Steps 1.Brainstorm and record ideas on your poster (3-5 mins) 1.Leave your poster and move to the next table 1.Read, add, and respond to ideas on poster #2 (2-3 mins) 1.Repeat process until all posters have been visited.

24 Aha! about Questioning and Research Skills

25 Please rearrange and reseat yourselves with someone new!

26 Inquiry Focus #2: Interpreting Visual Data CCSS Reading in Science and Technology

27 Kids and teachers know PPT, but do they know how to display data visually to answer a question?

28 RST Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). Costello, Emily. "Turkey power: could turkey dung power your town?" SuperScience Apr. 2008: 12+. Science in Context. Web. 22 Mar Creating graphics – tools and sites: Chartgo.comCanva Glogster Infogr.am Visual.lyPiktochartEasel.ly Cool text

29 Example Created with Visual.ly

30 Your turn: Express information visually with data from "Turkey power: could turkey dung power your town?" “The power plant burns 500,000 tons of turkey litter each year. That much poop weighs as much as 350 male elephants!” “Minnesota raises more turkeys than any other state. Every year, farmers there raise roughly 45 million turkeys. Those turkeys produce 1.7 million tons of turkey litter a year.” “The plant creates enough electricity to power 40,000 homes.” “Fossil fuels like oil and coal form underground over millions of years.Turkey litter is a renewable resource--it won't run out. As long as farmers raise turkeys, the birds will produce waste to power the plant.” “The power plant in Minnesota is small. Ten plants that size would be needed to create the same amount of electricity as a typical coal-burning plant.” Chartgo.comCanva Glogster Infogr.am Visual.lyPiktochartEasel.ly Cool text

31 RST Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words. Part 2: Use this handout for a short burst assignment.

32 RST Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words. Part 1: Compare the data from the two graphs on the next slide to summarize similarities and differences in energy consumption between the two countries.

33 Comparison of Energy Consumption in US and China

34 What are Essential Question possibilities??? At your table, come up with two possible essential questions using any of the methods covered so far today!

35 Aha! about Interpreting Visual Data

36 Inquiry Focus #3: Analyzing Primary Sources CCSS Reading in History

37 RH 6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. Essential Question: What can we learn about eras, specific events, or attitudes by examining primary source materials?

38 Approaches to Teaching with Primary Sources ●Library of Congress (LOC) Training: Teaching With Primary Sources ○Three sessions at WLMA14 offered by NCCE TechSavvy Librarian, Richard Snyder ●Teachinghistory.orgTeachinghistory.org ●Reading Like A Historian/Stanford History Education GroupReading Like A Historian/Stanford History Education Group ●National Archives Docs TeachNational Archives Docs Teach

39 Getting to LOC loc.gov/teachers → Using Primary Sources → Teacher’s Guide and Analysis Tool → PSA may be used online or printed Let’s give it a try!

40 I seeI think I wonder And summary

41

42 A closer look ExclusionPoster.pdf

43 Further Investigation/Summary (bottom of PSA handout): Summarize your discoveries, using evidence from the text/source to support your ideas. Choose one question you have that you may want to further investigate. Be ready to share...

44 Teachinghistory.org Crop ItCrop It activity → downloadables on the left side → more hands on

45 Exploration Time: Find sources, create a lesson, or just explore any of the below: Library of Congress (LOC.gov) UW Libraries Digital Collections National Archives Washington State Library Digital Collections Chronicling America Smithsonian Alternatively, look back at other short burst research ideas and locate/develop related resources.

46 Aha! about Analyzing Primary Sources

47 Common Core Supports from OSPI: General Support / Overall CCSS Leadership: General Jessica Vavrus, Math Support / CCSS Coordination Lead: Anne Gallagher, ELA Support: Liisa Moilanen Potts,

48 Contact Information: Kristi Bonds, Craig Seasholes, Continue the conversation on #TLC3

49 Evaluations and Clock Hours Please fill out online. Your trainers will then give you your signed clock hours form. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/H3ZXKGD Thanks for coming today! See you at Conference 2014!


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