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Small Business Partnering on Research and Innovation with DHS (SBIR) Programs WBB Small Business Outreach Event January 14, 2014 Frank Barros Program Analyst.

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Presentation on theme: "Small Business Partnering on Research and Innovation with DHS (SBIR) Programs WBB Small Business Outreach Event January 14, 2014 Frank Barros Program Analyst."— Presentation transcript:

1 Small Business Partnering on Research and Innovation with DHS (SBIR) Programs WBB Small Business Outreach Event January 14, 2014 Frank Barros Program Analyst SBIR Program Office Science and Technology Directorate

2 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 What does this mean? Operative words: DHS, partnering, research, innovation 2 Small Business Partnering on Research and Innovation with DHS

3 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Homeland Security prior to : activities spread across more than 40 federal agencies and an estimated 2000 separate congressional appropriations accounts. February 2001: U.S. Commission on National Security/21 st Century (Hart-Rudman Commission) – Phase III Report recommended creation of a new National Homeland Security Agency. March 2001 – H.R – National Homeland Security Agency Act (Max Thornberry, R-TX) – debate but no final action. The Department of Homeland Security – DHS 3

4 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 September 11, 2001: The attack on the homeland October 8, 2001: Executive Order – established two entities within the White House to determine homeland security policy. October 11, 2001: S (Lieberman/Specter) – Department of Homeland Security – more debate, no final action. June 6, 2002: President Bush proposed creation of a Cabinet level Department of Homeland Security. November 25, 2002: PL : The Department of Homeland Security with former Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge as its first Secretary. DHS (con’t) 4

5 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003  Preventing Terrorism and Enhancing Security  Securing and Managing Our Borders  Enforcing and Administering Our Immigration Laws  Safeguarding and Securing Cyberspace  Ensuring Resilience to Disasters  Providing Essential Support to National and Economic Security Homeland Security Missions 5

6 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Why did I tell you this? Because:  Everything we do relates to the fulfilment of our mission  Everything we develop relates to the fulfilment of our mission  Everything we purchase relates to the fulfilment of our mission We do not purchase or develop technology for technology’s sake. We purchase or develop technologies to solve a problem in fulfilling our mission. Why? 6

7 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Organization Chart 7 DHS Components with SBIR Programs Organization chart available at: Last Updated on: April 10, 2013

8 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 A Day in the Life of Homeland Security … 8 SEA  Patrol 3.4 million square miles of U.S. waterways  Seize 19,040 pounds of drugs at/near U.S. port 448 airports before they board aircraft of entry  Lead 100+ waterborne patrols near maritime critical infrastructure and key resources  Conduct 54 search and rescue cases AIR  Pre-Screen 2 million passengers before they fly into, out of, within, or over the U.S.  Screen 1.8 million passengers and their checked baggage for explosives and prohibited items at 448 airports before they board aircraft  Perform 200 inspections of air carriers and airport infrastructure

9 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 … A Day in the Life of Homeland Security 9 LAND  Screen 100% of cargo and vehicles entering the U.S. from Canada and Mexico  Naturalize 3,200 new U.S. citizens  Verify the identities of 109,000+ applicants for visas or border-crossing cards  Train 350 members of law enforcement, faith-based, academic, and private sector communities to respond to active shooter scenarios  Seize $500,000 in counterfeit U.S. currency before it is introduced into circulation Canada Mexico Process one million, travelers entering the U.S. by air, sea, and land

10 Presenter’s Name June 17, … A Day in the Life of Homeland Security LAND  Train:  5,880+ federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial emergency management and response personnel  2,100+ officers and agents from 90+ federal agencies, as well as 125+ state, local, rural, tribal, territorial, and international officers and agents  94 stakeholders from critical infrastructure sectors to identify, mitigate, and respond to cyber attacks  Provide $3.7 million in federal disaster grants to individuals and households, following presidentially-declared disaster declarations  Engage the public every day through “If You See Something, Say Something”  Provide Secret Service protection for an average of 30 U.S. government officials and their families

11 Presenter’s Name June 17, … A Day in the Life of Homeland Security CYBER  Prevent $6.8 million in potential losses through cyber crime investigations  Respond to 70 cybersecurity incidents per month while issuing warnings for each  Issue 20+ actionable alerts for public and private sector to protect their systems Data on the “A Day in the Life of Homeland Security” slides is approximate and represents daily averages based on annual Department-wide statistics. “If You See Something Say Something TM ” used with permission by the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

12 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS S&T Directorate Mission 12 Strengthen America’s security and resilience by providing knowledge products and innovative technology solutions for the Homeland Security Enterprise

13 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS Percent of Total Budget Authority by Organization, FY2014 President’s Budget 13 ~ $59.959B in FY2014 across all organizations Source: Budget-in-Brief Fiscal Year Percent of Total Budget Authority by Organization, FY14 President’s Budget Customs and Border Protection (CBP)21% U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)18% Transportation Security Administration (TSA)14% Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)11% Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)10% FEMA Grants 7% U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) 5% National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) 4% U.S. Secret Service (USSS) 3% Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) 2% Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) 1% Department Operations (Dept. Ops) 2% Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC); Office of Inspector General (OIG); and Office of Health Affairs (OHA) 1% Analysis and Operations (A&O) 1% All others S&T DNDO

14 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS S&T Directorate’s First Responders Group 14  Support to the Homeland Security Enterprise and First Responders Group (FRG) – Engages first responders to better understand their needs – Develops innovative solutions to address their most pressing challenges, from small- to large-scale emergencies – Helps practitioners identify requirements for transition to use

15 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS S&T’s Technical Divisions – HSARPA (Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency) 15  Borders and Maritime Security Division - Prevent contraband, criminals and terrorists from entering the U.S. while permitting the lawful flow of commerce and visitors  Chemical/Biological Defense Division - Detect, protect against, respond to, and recover from potential biological or chemical events  Cyber Security Division – Secure the Nation’s current and future cyber and critical infrastructures against persistent threats and dynamic attacks  Explosives Division - Detect, prevent and mitigate explosives attacks against people and infrastructure  Resilient Systems Division – Strengthen resilience to all hazard disasters

16 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Partnering 16 End User Technology Gap S&T / DNDO Technology Foraging BAA / LRBAA 2-3 Years Solution End User SBIR Phase I / Phase II Phase III T&E Innovative Solution-Market 3 years long term 5 years

17 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS SBIR – A Three-Phase Program 17 Phase I: Scientific and Technical Feasibility/Study  Funded with SBIR funds, 33% may be outsourced  Not to exceed 6 months in duration  Up to an additional $5,000 per year may be proposed for Technical Assistance  $100,000 for S&T Directorate’s SBIR  $150,000 for DNDO’s SBIR Phase II: Full Research/R&D Prototype Demonstration  Funded with SBIR funds, 50% may be outsourced  Generally 24 months in duration  Up to an additional $5,000 per year may be proposed for Technical Assistance  $750K for base effort for S&T Directorate’s SBIR  Potential for additional $250,000 for Phase IIB  $1,000,000 for DNDO’s SBIR Phase III: Commercialization Stage (non SBIR funds)  Funded with private or non-SBIR government sources  No dollar or time limits  Size standards do not apply  For work that derives from, furthers the Phase I/Phase II effort, or brings to conclusion  Can be sole-sourced; competition determined in Phase I New in FY13

18 Presenter’s Name June 17, Solicitation 18 Closing date: January 22, 2014 H-SB Mobile Footprint Detection H-SB Mass Delivery of Countermeasure for High Consequences Diseases in Wildlife H-SB System Simulation Tools for X-ray based Explosive Detection Equipment H-SB Physiological Monitoring and Environmental Scanning Technology H-SB Machine to Machine Architecture to Improve First Responder Communications H-SB Smart Device Compatible Module for Radiation Identification, Categorization, and Quantification. H-SB Miniaturization of Support Infrastructure for Non-Intrusive Inspection X-Ray Systems

19 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS SBIR: Treated as a Federal Procurement 19  Subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FARs)  Topics are determined by the government  Announcements and solicitations in FedBizOpps  Federal employee review panels, source selection authority  Firm-fixed price Phase I and sometimes Phase II contracts  Cost plus fixed fee Phase II contracts subject to a DCAA audit DHS issues contracts, not grants, for its SBIR awards

20 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 SBIR Solicitation Information and Release Dates 20 S&T DirectorateDNDO Number of Solicitations per Fiscal Year21 Pre-Solicitation/Solicitation ReleasedLate Fall and Early SpringSpring, depending on funding Number of Days Pre-Solicitation Posted157 Where Posted  FedBizOpps: https://www.fbo.gov  SBIR website: https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov  FedBizOpps: https://www.fbo.gov Direct Contract with Topic Authors Permitted Yes, 15 days after pre-solicitation is released No Open Question and Answer PeriodVia solicitation release to two weeks prior to close Via after solicitation is released Number of Days to Submit Proposal3045 Proposal SubmissionVia secure portal at https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov Per solicitation Proposal ReviewersFederal EmployeesFederal Employees & SMEs Always read the solicitations; Changes happen!

21 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 SBIR Solicitation Topics 21 S&T DirectorateDNDO Number of Topics per Solicitation6 – 8, dependent on funding Varies, dependent on funding Topic Technical Areas (see https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov for past solicitation topics) Borders and maritime security; Chemical/biological detection; Cyber security; Explosives detection; Resilient systems; Technologies for first responders Radiological/nuclear detection technologies Materials development and supporting technology; Passive techniques; Active techniques; Integrated approaches; Nuclear forensics Number of Phase I Contract Awards per Topic, historically 3 Multiple Number of Phase I Projects Progressing to Phase II, historically ~1/3~1/2 Topics from the community can be submitted at https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov/portal/public/Menu.action?page=sbir_recommendations

22 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS SBIR Historical Conversion Rates, FY04 –FY13 22  ~ 16% of the 3,267 Phase I submissions received awards  Then, ~ 37% of Phase I awards received a Phase II award  And ~ 21% of Phase II projects received Phase III funding  ~ $63M non-SBIR investment (government and/or private sources) DHS SBIR is a highly competitive process; award recipients are moving towards commercialization. Phase IPhase IIPhase III Commercialization Number of Projects

23 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 How “Small” is the SBC that Proposes to and Receives Awards from the DHS S&T SBIR Program? (FY04.2 – FY13.2 data) 23 63% Phase I submissions from SBCs with fewer than 24 employees 49% Phase I awards to SBCs with fewer than 24 employees *Includes STTR data

24 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS SBIR Statistics on Small Business Demographics (FY04.2 – FY13.2 data) 24

25 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 DHS SBIR Phase I: A National Perspective Data through FY13.2* 25 Total Phase I Submissions/Awards 3,267/536 *Includes STTR data Submissions from 50 states, plus DC and Puerto Rico Awards in 42 states AK 4/1 NV 25/4 UT 32/8 ID 8/0 MT 9/2 WY 2/0 ND 2/0 SD 3/0 NE 7/1 KS 8/1 AR 4/0 LA 19/2 SC 10/1 WV 11/1 IA 4/0 WI 15/2 PR 3/0 WA 60/12 OR 26/6 CA 668/121 AZ 58/12 NM 50/7 CO 81/15 TX 165/25 OK 13/4 MO 20/3 MN 46/7 IL 58/7 ME 15/2 NY 122/30 MI 98/13 IN 45/5 PA 76/11 OH 63/2 KY 13/1 TN 22/1 MS 8/0 AL 71/12 GA 43/3 FL 119/17 NC 33/5 VA 304/50 NH 33/6 MA 375/87 RI 8/1 CT 55/9 NJ 86/8 DE 16/0 MD 215/27 DC 5/ 0 HI 21/3 VT 10/1

26 Presenter’s Name June 17, small businesses in 42 states have received DHS SBIR funding 85 patents filed  31 patents issued  28 patents pending 40 commercial products in the market* 30+ mergers and acquisitions Evidence that DHS SBIR-funded Technology has Helped Enable U.S. Small Businesses to be Successful and Profitable 26 * data from a 2013 survey (includes standalone products, active licenses, products with DHS technology incorporated)

27 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 SBIR Website Portal 27 https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov SolicitationsAwards Recommend a Topic Mailing List Signup

28 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Useful Web Sites and DHS SBIR Points of Contact 28 Useful Web Sites  https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov  https://baa2.st.dhs.gov    https://www.fbo.gov  Useful Web Sites  https://sbir2.st.dhs.gov  https://baa2.st.dhs.gov    https://www.fbo.gov  To report SBIR fraud, waste and abuse: Anonymous Hotline: Fax: Mail: DHS Office of Inspector General/Mail Stop 2600, Attn: Office of Investigations-Hotline, 245 Murray Drive SW, Building 410 Washington, DC Elissa (Lisa) Sobolewski DHS SBIR Program Director (202) Francis (Frank) Barros DHS S&T Directorate SBIR Program Analyst (202) S&T Directorate SBIR Program Inquiries Kevin Gutierrez DHS DNDO Program Manager (202) DNDO Program Inquiries

29 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Successful SBIR Phase I Proposal to DHS 29 Do Not … X Submit proposals via (unless the solicitation states to do so) X Submit duplicate proposals X Ask the Program Office for guidance regarding whether or not your company should submit a proposal X Request an extension X Wait until the deadline to submit your proposal DO… Read the solicitations and follow all the instructions Ensure your proposal aligns with and responds to the scope of the topic description Obtain DUNs, CAGE, and SBA registration numbers prior to proposal submission Register in System for Award Management (SAM), SBIR.gov, and the S&T SBIR portal prior to proposal submission Follow the procedures for requesting clarifications/questions on research topics Clearly articulate the proposed innovation Provide a detailed and well-organized work plan Provide qualifications for key personnel, including the PI Pay attention to the requirements of the Commercialization Strategy section MOST IMPORTANT DO’s!!!  Register early!  Read, read, read the solicitation and topic description(s)  Read, read, and re-read your proposal submission prior to submission

30 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 You should be interested in the SBIR Program if …. 30 ~ $2.4 ~ $2.4 B in FY2012 across 11 agencies (1) You want free money,  To conduct research leading to a commercializable product, service, or process Provided via grant or contract awards (depending on agency making award) not a loan; no repayment

31 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 (2)you have an idea or concept for an innovative technology or product (3)your idea may/may not be feasible… but if it is, it could revolutionize some aspect of a participating agency’s mission (4)you want a potential leveraging tool to attract venture capital and other sources of $$$ (5) you want to spinoff a business venture to take your innovation into the commercial market (6) you want to retain intellectual property data rights (FAR ) (7) you want a sole source marketing position with a ready-made customer base (8) you want to be recognized as a unique national resource of technological innovation 31 You should be interested in the SBIR Program if ….

32 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 SAFETY Act Support Anti-Terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act of  Enables the development and deployment of qualified anti-terrorism technologies  Provides important legal liability protections for manufacturers and sellers of effective technologies  Removes barriers to industry investments in new and unique technologies  Creates market incentives for industry to invest in measures to enhance our homeland security  The SAFETY Act liability protections apply to a vast range of technologies, including:  Products  Services  Software and other forms of intellectual property (IP) Protecting You, Protecting U.S. Examples of eligible technologies: Threat and vulnerability assessment services Detection Systems Blast Mitigation Materials Screening Services Sensors and Sensor Integration Vaccines Metal Detectors Decision Support Software Security Services Data Mining Software https://www.safetyact.gov

33 Presenter’s Name June 17, 2003 Questions? 33

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