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TOPIC C BOND ENERGIES AND ENTHALPIES. Atoms are attracted to one another when the outer electrons of one atom are electrostatically attracted to the nuclei.

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Presentation on theme: "TOPIC C BOND ENERGIES AND ENTHALPIES. Atoms are attracted to one another when the outer electrons of one atom are electrostatically attracted to the nuclei."— Presentation transcript:

1 TOPIC C BOND ENERGIES AND ENTHALPIES

2 Atoms are attracted to one another when the outer electrons of one atom are electrostatically attracted to the nuclei of another atom. The attraction between two atoms makes them increasingly stable, giving lower and lower potential energies.

3 As the atoms approach one another and get closer There is a point at which the two nuclei will start to repel one another. As they repel one another the potential energy is raised, and the two atoms become less stable A bond is formed between the atoms at a distance where the forces of attraction and repulsion result in the lowest (most stable) potential energy. The distance is called the bond length, and the potential energy at that point the bond strength.

4 A typical plot for the formation of the simplest molecule, H 2 is shown below where 74 pm and 436 kJ are the bond length and strength respectively.

5 Forces of attraction that stabilize atoms when they bond are attractions between electrons and nuclei The greater the number of electrons involved the stronger the attraction triple covalent bonds tend to be stronger than double bonds double bonds stronger than single bonds. Shorter bonds also tend to be stronger than longer ones.

6 The strength of the bond in a diatomic covalent molecule is determined by breaking the bond Called the bond dissociation energy (BDE). For example, hydrogen, H 2 (H-H), H 2 (g)  2H(g) Bond energy = +436 kJ Now consider a polyatomic molecule, for example methane, CH 4. Methane has four identical C-H bonds, but each has a different BDE (only approx. values are shown below, but they are different). CH4(g)  CH3(g) + H(g) BDE= +440 kJ CH3(g)  CH2(g) + H(g) BDE= +460 kJ CH2(g)  CH(g) + H(g) BDE= +420 kJ CH(g)  C(g) + H(g) BDE= +340 kJ

7 The strength of each individual C-H bond is slightly different. To overcome this we define the bond energy as the average of the four C-H bonds. To break a bond, energy is put in (endothermic with a positive energy change) To form a bond, energy is released (exothermic with a negative energy change) Reactants  Products (breaking) (forming)

8 Energy change for a reaction is calculated by: 1. Summing the energy required to break each of the bonds in the reactants (a positive value) 2. Summing the energy released when making each of the bonds in the products (a negative value) 3. Energy change = Sum of Bonds Broken – Sum of Bonds Formed..

9 Endothermic: Energy needed to break the reactant bonds >> Energy released in forming the product bonds The system absorbs energy from the surroundings. Temperature of the surroundings drops Exothermic: Energy needed to break the reactant bonds << Energy released in forming the product bonds The system releases energy to the surroundings Temperature of the surroundings rises.

10 Use the data in the table (handout) to answer the questions below. 1. Calculate the standard enthalpy of the reaction below. CH 3 CH=CH 2 + H 2  CH 3 CH 2 CH 3 2. Calculate the enthalpy change for the reaction below. CH 3 CH=CH 2 + Br 2  CH 2 BrCHBrCH 3 3. Calculate the enthalpy change for the reaction below. CH 4 (g) + 2Cl 2 (g) + 2F 2 (g)  CF 2 Cl 2 (g) + 2HF(g) +2HCl(g) 4. Without doing any calculations, determine the enthalpy change for the reaction CH 3 CH 2 OH + CH 3 COOH  CH 3 CO 2 CH 2 CH 3 + H 2 O

11 Enthalpy: Every substance is said to have a heat content or enthalpy. Enthalpy is given the symbol, H. Most reactions involve an enthalpy change, ΔH (Delta H), where;

12 Enthalpy level diagrams: The enthalpy change in a reaction can be illustrated using enthalpy level diagrams. ENDOTHERMIC reactions. Enthalpy of products > Enthalpy of reactants, ΔH is positive Reaction is ENDOTHERMIC. This means energy is absorbed by the reaction (system) from the surroundings The temperature of the surroundings goes down Work being done on the system.

13 Endothermic

14 EXOTHERMIC reactions. Enthalpy of products < Enthalpy of reactants ΔH is negative and the Reaction is EXOTHERMIC. This means energy is released from the reaction (system) to the surroundings The temperature of the surroundings goes up) or Work being done on the surroundings.

15 Exothermic

16 When discussing the enthalpy of a substance it is necessary to state the conditions under which the enthalpy is measured. Standard State: Usually enthalpy changes are stated under the following conditions gases at 1 atm pressure All solutions at unit (1 M) concentration Temperature (298 K)

17 During these endothermic and exothermic reactions, energy is transferred either from or to the surroundings.

18 Made a table of standard heats of formation. The amount of heat needed to form 1 mole of a compound from its elements in their standard states. Standard states are 1 atm, 1M and 25ºC For an element it is 0 There is a table in Appendix 4 (TB pg. A21) Standard Enthalpies (Heat) of Formation

19 Standard Enthalpy of Formation (ΔH f o ) The enthalpy change when one mole of a substance is formed from its elements, in their standard states. For example, ΔH f o [C 2 H 5 OH(l)] = kJ/mol means that when the reaction below is carried out, 279 kJ of energy are released. 2C(graphite) + 3H 2 (g) + ½O 2 (g)  C 2 H 5 OH(l) ΔH o = kJmol-1

20 Need to be able to write the equations. What is the equation for the formation of NO 2 ? ½N 2 (g) + O 2 (g)  NO 2 (g) Have to make one mole to meet the definition. Write the equation for the formation of methanol CH 3 OH. Standard Enthalpies (Heat) of Formation

21 We can use heats of formation to figure out the heat of reaction. Since we can manipulate the equations

22 Practice: Write equations to represent the following processes. 1. The standard enthalpy of formation of CH 3 Br(l) 2. The standard enthalpy of formation of CH 3 COC 2 H 5 (l) 3. The standard enthalpy of formation of NaNO 3 (s) 4. All elements are assigned a value for enthalpy of formation equal to zero. Why?

23 The enthalpy change for a reaction at standard conditions (25ºC, 1 atm, 1 M solutions) Symbol  Hº When using Hess’s Law, work by adding the equations up to make it look like the answer. The other parts will cancel out. Standard Enthalpy

24 Using the standard enthalpies of formation listed in the appendix, calculate the standard enthalpy change for the overall reaction that occurs when ammonia is burned in air to form nitrogen dioxide and water. 4NH 3 (g) + 7O 2 (g) → 4NO 2 (g) + 6H 2 O (l) Using enthalpies of formation, calculate the standard change in enthalpy for the thermite reaction: 2Al (s) + Fe 2 O 3 (s) → Al 2 O 3 (s) + 2Fe (s) Examples 6.9 and 6.10

25 Standard Enthalpy of Combustion (ΔH c o ) The enthalpy change when one mole of a substance is completely burned in oxygen Energy is usually released in such a reaction ΔH c o will usually be negative For example, ΔH c o [C 2 H 6 (g)] = kJ/mol means that when the reaction below is carried out, 1565 kJ of energy are released. C 2 H 6 (g) + 3½O 2 (g)  2CO 2 (g) + 3H 2 O(l) ΔH o = kJ/mol

26 Compounds containing carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, only produce carbon dioxide and water, when completely burned in air (O 2 ) Practice: Write equations to represent the following processes. 1. The standard enthalpy of combustion of C 5 H 12 (l) 2. The standard enthalpy of combustion of CO(g) 3. The standard enthalpy of combustion of H 2 (g) 4. The standard enthalpy of combustion of Al(s)

27 Enthalpy is a state function meaning it is independent of the path. We can add equations to come up with the desired final reaction and add the associated  H values to get the final ∆H. Two rules using Hess’s Law: 1. If the reaction is reversed the sign of  H is changed 2. If the reaction is multiplied by a constant, so is  H for that reaction. Hess’s Law

28 Overall Reaction: N 2 + 2O 2 → 2NO 2 ∆H 1 = 68kJ Reaction steps added: N 2 + O 2 → 2NO ∆H 2 = 180kJ 2NO + O 2 → 2NO 2 ∆H 3 = -112kJ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________ N 2 + 2O 2 → 2NO 2 ∆H 2 + ∆H 3 = 68kJ Nitrogen + Oxygen → Nitrogen Dioxide

29 N2N2 2O 2 O2O2 NO 2 68 kJ NO kJ -112 kJ H (kJ)

30 If a reaction is reversed the sign of ∆H is also reversed. The magnitude of ∆H is directly proportional to the quantities of reactants and products. If coefficients are multiplied by an integer, then ∆H is multiplied by the same integer Examples (TB): 6.7 and 6.8 Characteristics of Enthalpy Changes

31 Born Haber cycles - The thermochemistry of the ionic bond The process of ionic bond formation can be broken down into stages. For the formation of sodium chloride there are two possible routes 1. A single step process (Enthalpy change = standard enthalpy of formation of NaCl) Na(s) + ½ Cl 2 (g)  NaCl(s) The standard enthalpy of formation is the enthalpy change when one mole of a substance is formed from its elements in their standard states.

32 2. A multi-step process involving five separate changes (i) Sublimation of sodium (ΔH a ) (atomization) (Enthalpy change = standard enthalpy of atomization of Na) Na(s)  Na(g) The standard enthalpy of sublimation is the energy required to form one mole of gaseous atoms from the element under standard conditions. (ii) Ionization of sodium (ΔH i ) (Enthalpy change = 1st ionization energy of Na) Na(g)  Na+(g) + e- The first ionization energy is the energy required to remove one mole electrons from one mole of atoms in the gaseous phase.

33 (iii) Dissociation of chlorine molecules (ΔH a ) (Enthalpy change = ½ standard BDE) ½ Cl2(g)  Cl(g) The standard enthalpy of bond dissociation is the energy required to dissociate one mole of molecules into atoms. (iv) Formation of gaseous chloride ions from gaseous chlorine atoms (  ΔH i ) (Enthalpy change = 1st electron affinity of chlorine) Cl(g) + e-  Cl-(g) The first electron affinity is the enthalpy change when one mole of gaseous atoms gains an electron to forms a mole of gaseous ions.

34 v) Bring together the gaseous ions (ΔH e ) (Enthalpy change = standard lattice enthalpy of NaCl) Na+(g) + Cl-(g)  NaCl(s) The standard lattice enthalpy is the enthalpy change when one mole of solid is formed from its constituent gaseous ions. When considering the attractions of ions for one another we should consider charge density. Small, highly charged ions have high charge densities. These ions tend to attract to a greater degree, and lead to higher melting points and higher lattice energies.

35 Discrepancies between calculated and experimental values of lattice enthalpy By assuming that a compound is 100% ionic, it’s possible to calculate a theoretical value for the lattice enthalpy. In some cases the theoretical values agree very closely with the experimental values, but in other cases discrepancies arise. Where the match is poor, the idea of a completely ionic bond is incorrect. The differences are caused by polarization and the ionic bond taking on a degree of covalent character.

36 Born-Haber Cycle Diagram – (see handout) Hess's Law states that the energy change for a reaction is independent of the route taken, so ΔH f = ΔH a(Na) + ΔH i(1) + ΔH a(Cl2) + ΔH e + ΔH i

37 An important note about the conventions of using kJ mol-1 on the AP exam. If you see a chemical reaction with a ΔH in units of kJ mol- 1 associated with it, it is reasonable to ask the question, “moles of what?” The question is an important one, since in the reaction there are likely to be a number of different reactants and products. For example the equation below, might have you asking, “moles of N 2 or F 2 or NF 3 ?” N 2 (g) + 3F 2 (g)  2NF 3 (g) ΔH = -264 kJ mol-1

38 On the AP exam, the ΔH value actually means kJ PER MOLE OF REACTION. So when 1 mole of N 2 reacts we would expect 264 kJ of energy to be released. This would also be the energy released when 3 moles of F 2 react, AND also when 2 moles of NF 3 is produced. HOWEVER, if only 1 mole of F 2 and one third of a mole of N 2 were to react, we would only expect one third of 264 kJ to be released. Similarly if only 1 mole of NF 3 were produced then the reaction would only release half of 264 kJ.


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