Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Go to section Pretest 1.According to the law of conservation of mass, if element X has a molar mass of 3 g/mol, and element Y has a molar mass of 5 g/mol,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Go to section Pretest 1.According to the law of conservation of mass, if element X has a molar mass of 3 g/mol, and element Y has a molar mass of 5 g/mol,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Go to section Pretest 1.According to the law of conservation of mass, if element X has a molar mass of 3 g/mol, and element Y has a molar mass of 5 g/mol, what must be the total mass of products formed when one mole of the compound X 2 Y decomposes? 2.True or False: A reaction rate is the rate at which reactants change into products over time. 3.If you tossed 128 coins in the air, about how many could you expect to land heads up? Chapter 10

2 Go to section Pretest (continued) 4.Suppose you were to remove any coins that landed heads up, and then toss the remaining coins in the air. How many times could you expect to repeat this process until you had removed all of the coins? 5.The element uranium belongs to a.Group 7A (halogens). b.Group 8A (noble gases). c.the lanthanide series. d.the actinide series. 6.Which subatomic particles are found in the nucleus of an atom? Chapter 10

3 Go to section Interest Grabber Modeling Beta Decay Cut out a strip of blue paper and a strip of red paper. Cut each strip of paper into 10 squares. Use the red squares to represent protons, and the blue squares to represent neutrons. 1.Arrange the correct number of each type of square on your desk in order to model a carbon-14 nucleus. How many of each type of square did you use in your model? 2.Switch out one blue square in your nuclear model with one red square so that the nucleus contains the same total number of subatomic particles. What isotope does your model now represent? 3.When a carbon-14 nucleus undergoes the change you have modeled, an electron is emitted. What is the nuclear charge of carbon-14? How does this compare to the sum of the charge of an electron and the nuclear charge of the new isotope formed? Section 10.1

4 Go to section Reading Strategy Previewing a. Nuclear decay is the spontaneous change of one isotope into another. b.What are the types of nuclear radiation? Section 10.1 c.What are the effects of nuclear radiation? d. One effect of nuclear radiation is the ionization of matter. e. How can nuclear radiation be detected? f. Nuclear radiation can be detected by a Geiger counter or film badge.

5 Go to section Penetrating Powers of Nuclear Radiation Figure 4

6 Go to section Penetrating Powers of Nuclear Radiation Figure 4

7 Go to section Penetrating Powers of Nuclear Radiation Figure 4

8 Go to section Penetrating Powers of Nuclear Radiation Figure 4

9 Go to section Balancing Nuclear Equations Section 10.1

10 Go to section Balancing Nuclear Equations Section 10.1

11 Go to section Balancing Nuclear Equations Section 10.1

12 Go to section Balancing Nuclear Equations Section 10.1

13 Go to section How Radon Gas Enters a Building Figure 4

14 Go to section How Radon Gas Enters a Building Figure 4

15 Go to section How Radon Gas Enters a Building Figure 4

16 Go to section How Radon Gas Enters a Building Figure 4

17 Go to section Interest Grabber Analogy for Half-Life The diagrams below represent the charge level of a battery in a robotic dog at different times during the day. You charged the battery so that it was at its highest level at 9:00 A.M. Examine the diagrams, and then answer the questions that follow. Section 10.2

18 Go to section Interest Grabber 1. The dog uses half of any remaining charge every 2 hours. So, if the battery is fully charged at 9:00 A.M., then the charge level will be at 11:00 A.M., two hours later. If it uses half of the remaining charge another two hours later, what will the energy level be at 1:00 P.M.? 2.Given the same trend, what time is it when the battery’s charge is at the level shown in the last diagram? 3. The battery must be recharged when its charge level reaches half of the level shown in the last diagram. What time will the battery need to be recharged? Section 10.2

19 Go to section Reading Strategy Identifying Detail Section 10.2 a. carbon-14 b. 50,000

20 Go to section Nuclear Decay of Iodine-131 Figure 7

21 Go to section Nuclear Decay of Iodine-131 Figure 7

22 Go to section Nuclear Decay of Iodine-131 Figure 7

23 Go to section Nuclear Decay of Iodine-131 Figure 7

24 Go to section Nuclear Decay of Iodine-131 Figure 7

25 Go to section Interest Grabber Section 10.3 Introduction to Transmutation Examine the diagram below that represents the nuclei of isotopes in a nuclear reaction, and answer the questions that follow. In the diagram, the light circles represent protons, and the dark circles represent neutrons. 1.What isotopes are represented by the starting nuclei? 2.What isotope is represented by the larger nucleus that is produced in the nuclear reaction? 3.What other particle is produced?

26 Go to section Reading Strategy Possible answers may include: a.Examples of artificial transmutation b.Rutheford’s transmutation of nitrogen-14 into oxygen-17; the synthesis of neptunium-239 Section 10.3 Monitoring Your Understanding c.Uses of transuranium elements d.Smoke detectors (americium-241); space probes (plutonium-238)

27 Go to section Interest Grabber Observing Attractive and Repulsive Forces 1.Arrange two bar magnets so that they stick together. Reverse the orientation of one of the magnets. Record your observations. 2.With a pencil, make 20 marks on an index card, each 1 mm apart. Place the magnets on the index card and orient them so that they repel one another. Gently tap them closer together until they will not move closer due to the repelling force. Using the pencil marks, record the distance between the two magnets. 3.Place the magnets on the index card and orient them so that they attract one another. Gently tap them closer together until they snap together on their own. Using the pencil marks, record the distance between the two magnets at the point just before they snap together. Section 10.4

28 Go to section Reading Strategy Comparing and Contrasting Section 10.4 a.is the splitting of a large nucleus into two smaller fragments b.is widely used as an alternative energy source c.is the fusing of two small nuclei into one larger nucleus d.is still being researched and developed as an alternative energy source

29 Go to section Comparing Strong Nuclear Forces and Electrical Forces Figure 15

30 Go to section Comparing Strong Nuclear Forces and Electrical Forces Figure 15

31 Go to section Comparing Strong Nuclear Forces and Electrical Forces Figure 15

32 Go to section Comparing Strong Nuclear Forces and Electrical Forces Figure 15

33 Go to section Effect of Nuclear Size on Nuclear and Electrical Forces Figure 16

34 Go to section Effect of Nuclear Size on Nuclear and Electrical Forces Figure 16

35 Go to section Effect of Nuclear Size on Nuclear and Electrical Forces Figure 16

36 Go to section Effect of Nuclear Size on Nuclear and Electrical Forces Figure 16

37 Go to section Nuclear Fission of Uranium-235 Figure 18

38 Go to section Nuclear Fission of Uranium-235 Figure 18

39 Go to section Nuclear Fission of Uranium-235 Figure 18

40 Go to section Nuclear Fission of Uranium-235 Figure 18

41 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

42 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

43 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

44 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

45 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

46 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

47 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

48 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

49 Go to section Chain Reaction of Uranium-235 Figure 19

50 Pretest Answers 11 g Chapter 10 Click the mouse button to display the answers. about 64 coins 1.According to the law of conservation of mass, if element X has a molar mass of 3 g/mol, and element Y has a molar mass of 5 g/mol, what must be the total mass of products formed when one mole of the compound X 2 Y decomposes? 2.True or False: A reaction rate is the rate at which reactants change into products over time. 3.If you tossed 128 coins in the air, about how many could you expect to land heads up?

51 Chapter 10 Pretest Answers (continued) Click the mouse button to display the answers. about 7 times protons and neutrons 4.Suppose you were to remove any coins that landed heads up, and then toss the remaining coins in the air. How many times could you expect to repeat this process until you had removed all of the coins? 5.The element uranium belongs to a. Group 7A (halogens). b.Group 8A (noble gases). c.the lanthanide series. d.the actinide series. 6.Which subatomic particles are found in the nucleus of an atom?

52 Interest Grabber Answers 1.Arrange the correct number of each type of square on your desk in order to model a carbon-14 nucleus. How many of each type of square did you use in your model? 6 red squares (protons), 8 blue squares (neutrons) 2.Switch out one blue square in your nuclear model with one red square so that the nucleus contains the same total number of subatomic particles. What isotope does your model now represent? nitrogen-14 3.When a carbon-14 nucleus undergoes the change you have modeled, an electron is emitted. What is the nuclear charge of carbon-14? How does this compare to the sum of the charge of an electron and the nuclear charge of the new isotope formed? The nuclear charge of carbon-14 is 6+, which is equal to the sum of the charge of an electron (1–), and the nuclear charge of nitrogen-14 (7+). Section 10.1

53 Interest Grabber Answers Section The dog uses half of any remaining charge every 2 hours. So, if the battery is fully charged at 9:00 A.M., then the charge level will be at 11:00 A.M., two hours later. If it uses half of the remaining charge another two hours later, what will the energy level be at 1:00 P.M.? ¼ 2.Given the same trend, what time is it when the battery’s charge is at the level shown in the last diagram? 3:00 P.M. 3.The battery must be recharged when its charge level reaches the level shown in the last diagram. What time will the battery need to be recharged? 5:00 P.M.

54 Interest Grabber Answers 1.What isotopes are represented by the starting nuclei? nitrogen-14 and helium-4 2.What isotope is represented by the larger nucleus that is produced in the nuclear reaction? oxyen-17 3.What other particle is produced? a proton Section 10.3

55 Interest Grabber Answers 1.Arrange two bar magnets so that they stick together. Reverse the orientation of one of the magnets. Record your observations. The magnets will repel one another. 2.With a pencil, make 20 marks on an index card, each 1 mm apart. Place the magnets on the index card and orient them so that they repel one another. Gently tap them closer together until they will not move closer due to the repelling force. Using the pencil marks, record the distance between the two magnets. The distance between the magnets when they repel one another will vary depending on the size or type of magnet. 3.Place the magnets on the index card and orient them so that they attract one another. Gently tap them closer together until they snap together on their own. Using the pencil marks, record the distance between the two magnets at the point just before they snap together. The distance between the magnets when they first attract one another will vary depending on the magnet. Section 10.4

56 Chapter 10 Go Online More on the issue of the development of archaeological sites Self-grading assessment Radioactivity activity For links on half-life, go to and enter the Web Code as follows: ccn-1102.www.SciLinks.org For links on fission, go to and enter the Web Code as follows: ccn-1104.www.SciLinks.org

57 This slide is intentionally blank.


Download ppt "Go to section Pretest 1.According to the law of conservation of mass, if element X has a molar mass of 3 g/mol, and element Y has a molar mass of 5 g/mol,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google