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Www.engageNY.org Elementary and Secondary Education Act Flexibility Waiver Renewal for 2015-19 March 6, 2015 Presented by Ira Schwartz, Assistant Commissioner.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.engageNY.org Elementary and Secondary Education Act Flexibility Waiver Renewal for 2015-19 March 6, 2015 Presented by Ira Schwartz, Assistant Commissioner."— Presentation transcript:

1 Elementary and Secondary Education Act Flexibility Waiver Renewal for March 6, 2015 Presented by Ira Schwartz, Assistant Commissioner

2 History of the ESEA Waiver 2 September 2011 September 2011 November 2014 September 2011 September/ November 2013 May 2012 July 2014 The USDE approved New York State’s Flexibility Waiver Request for the and school years. President Obama announced an ESEA regulatory flexibility initiative. The USDE offered states with approved ESEA Flexibility Waivers the opportunity to renew the waivers for the , , and * school years. The USDE approved New York State’s Flexibility Waiver Renewal Request for the school year. USDE offered states with approved ESEA Flexibility Waivers the opportunity to renew the waivers for the school year only.

3 ESEA Flexibility Waiver Principles  Principle 1 –Implementation of college- and career-ready standards and high-quality assessments aligned to those standards.  Principle 2 – A differentiated accountability system with meaningful interventions for lowest performing schools and districts based on need and identification of high- performing or rapidly improving schools.  Principle 3 – Implementation of teacher and principal evaluation and support systems  Principle 4 - Reduction of duplication and unnecessary burden. 3

4 Key Provisions to Be Retained 4 Math Graduation Rate Science Participation Rate ELA School and District Accountability Determinations Performance Index (PI ) ELA, Mathematics, and Science Results Identify Particular Schools or Districts as Focus, Priority or Local Assistance Plan Schools or Focus Districts Progress Filters Low Performing Schools Local Assistance Plan Schools Two Years of Progress Minimum Performance Standards Removal from Identification Special Act School Districts, NYC CSD 75 Schools and Transfer High Schools Case by Case Determinations Special Rules

5 Key Provisions to Be Retained Identify high performing and rapidly improving schools as Reward Schools and make grants available to selected Title I Reward Schools. Require Focus Districts to participate in the Diagnostic Tool for School and District Effectiveness, District Comprehensive Improvement Plans (DCIP), and School Comprehensive Educational Plans (SCEP) processes. Require Focus Districts to offer Public School Choice to students attending Title I Priority and Focus Schools, set aside an amount equal to 5-15% of the district’s Title I, IIA, and if applicable Title III funds to support Priority and Focus School improvement plans and 1% for parent engagement activities. Offer Priority Schools the opportunity to compete for 1003(g) School Improvement Grant funds. Require Priority Schools to implement a whole school reform model, assess school leadership, and offer extended learning time. 5

6 ESEA Renewal Request for Department staff does not recommend making any amendments to New York’s current waiver pertaining to: Principle 1: College- and Career-ready Expectations for all Students or Principle 3: Supporting Effective Instruction and Leadership. 6 The proposed revisions to the ESEA Waiver for the school year period fall into two primary categories: Additions made to address new waiver requirements from USDE. Amendments to streamline: Existing school and district improvement planning processes and Accountability designation methodologies in order to support school and district improvement efforts.

7 ESEA Renewal: USDE Requirements States Must: Provide a description of interventions in the State's lowest- performing schools and schools with the largest achievement gaps. Include how the State will identify those Priority and Focus Schools that have not met targets and the increased rigor of interventions and supports in those schools. Provide a list of Priority and Focus Schools by January 31, 2016 to USED. Included in this list will be re-identified Focus and Priority Schools. Continue to identify at least five percent of its Title I Schools as Priority and ten percent as Focus. 7

8 NYSED’s Count of School Designations by Type of District 8 * Districts in Good Standing 631 Focus Districts 62 Rest of State Focus Districts - 61 *Districts in Good Standing Schools in Good Standing 3041 Reward Schools 245 LAP Schools 213 Focus Schools 231 *All Districts * Please note that all New York City School Districts (32) are considered as one school district Schools in Good Standing 1135 *New York City Counted as one Focus District Focus Schools 209 Schools in Good Standing 179 Priority Schools 87 LAP Schools 27 LAP Schools 59 Priority Schools 91 Reward Schools 97 Please note that the following is true of Charter Schools: Reward Charter Schools - 12 Good Standing Charter Schools LAP Charter Schools - 12 Focus Charter Schools - 6

9 ESEA Renewal: Re-Identified Focus Schools Under the Draft ESEA Renewal Proposal: 9 Re-Identified Focus Schools Must begin intensive implementation of at least one ESEA turnaround principle starting no later than the school year. Revise SCEP to focus on the needs identified through the school’s most recent DTSDE reviews. Districts with a Re-Identified Focus School Must complete a school leader checklist for the re-identified Focus School if principal has been school leader for more than two years.

10 ESEA Renewal: Re-Identified Priority Schools 10 An NYSED team will visit the school and make one of three recommendations. Continue to implement current improvement plan. Implement a new school comprehensive education plan or “out of time” plan. Phase out or close.

11 ESEA Renewal: Re-Identified Priority Schools Under the Draft ESEA Renewal Proposal: If the district is allowed to either continue its current plan or implement a new plan, the district must: Complete a school leader checklist (if the principal has been leader of school for more than two full academic years); Ensure that the school has extended learning time; and Ensure that the staff at the school participate in mandatory professional development in support of the current or new plan. Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) must begin implementation of approved plans in the school year and must fully implement plans no later than the beginning of the school year. 11

12 ESEA Renewal: Re-Identified LAP Schools 12 After three consecutive years of identification - the school must conduct a school- led review with district oversight and use that review as the basis for development of a new Local Assistance Plan. After four years - the school must participate in a district-led DTSDE review, and use that review as the basis for development of an SCEP. After five years - the school must participate in an IIT DTSDE review. The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School.  o The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School. After three consecutive years of identification - the school must conduct a school- led review with district oversight and use that review as the basis for development of a new Local Assistance Plan. After four years - the school must participate in a district-led DTSDE review, and use that review as the basis for development of an SCEP. After five years - the school must participate in an IIT DTSDE review. The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School.  o The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School. After Three Consecutive Years of Identification - the school must conduct a school- led review with district oversight and use that review as the basis for development of a new Local Assistance Plan. After Four Years - the school must participate in a district-led DTSDE review, and use that review as the basis for development of an SCEP. After Five Years - the school must participate in an IIT DTSDE review. The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School.  o The IIT may recommend to the Commissioner that the school be identified as a Focus School. The IIT review must be used as the basis for development of an SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School.  Be identified as a Focus School beginning with school year, and must complete DTSDE review.  Use DTSDE review results to develop a SCEP that meets all requirements for a Focus School. Note: This may also result in the district becoming a Focus District.  Unacceptably large gaps in performance among groups of students that are not closing; or  Having failed for three years to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) on an accountability measure for the same subgroup of students; or  Performing at a level that would otherwise have caused the school to be identified as Focus, if the school were located in a Focus District.

13 ESEA Waiver School Accountability Status Overview – Reward Schools, Schools in Good Standing and LAP Schools 13 Type of Designation Reason for IdentificationInterventions/Supports After Re-identification (Under ESEA Renewal) Reward Schools Highest Performing and Highest Progress Schools No mandated planning requirement; Title I schools that are designated as Rewards Schools for two consecutive years are eligible for Reward School Grants. Schools in Good Standing Schools not identified as LAP, Focus or Priority No mandated planning requirement. Local Assistance Plan Schools (LAP) LAP Schools have unacceptably large gaps in performance among groups of students; have failed for three consecutive years to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for a group of students on an accountability measure; or are performing at a level that would otherwise have caused the school to be identified as Focus, if the school were located in a Focus District. School develops LAP plan based on the DTSDE, and the district is eligible for 1003(a) grant if the school is eligible for Title I funds. If the district is in Good Standing, must post the Board-approved plan on its website. If the district is a Focus district, the plan must be included in the submitted District Comprehensive Improvement Plan (DCIP). Beginning with school year results, schools that have been LAP for three consecutive years, will be identified as Focus. School must participate in DTSDE process and develop an SCEP. District may be newly identified as a Focus District.

14 ESEA Waiver School Accountability Status Overview – Focus Schools 14 Focus Schools The lowest performing 10% of all schools in the State that are not improving based on performance of subgroups in ELA and math and for graduation rate. Focus Schools must be located in a Focus District. School must develop a School Comprehensive Education Plan (SCEP) focused on the needs identified through an Integrated Intervention Team review, district- led review, or School Review with District Oversight based on the DTSDE. The district is eligible for 1003(a) grant to support the school plan, if the school is eligible for Title I. Re-identified Focus Schools must revise their SCEP and begin intensive implementation of at least one ESEA turnaround principle (e.g., redesign the school day, week, or year; modify the instructional program to ensure it is research-based, rigorous, and aligned with State academic content standards; provide time for collaboration on the use of data) starting no later than the school year. Districts must complete a school leader checklist for the re- identified Focus School, if the principal has been leader of the school for more than two full academic years, in order to determine whether the school leader should be provided additional professional development and/or mentoring or replaced.

15 15 ESEA Waiver School Accountability Status Overview – Priority Schools Priority Schools The lowest performing 5% of all schools in the State that are not improving based on aggregate performance in ELA and math combined and graduation rate (three consecutive years of a graduation rate below 60%).  School develops School Comprehensive Education Plan (SCEP) focused on the needs identified through an Integrated Intervention Team review of the school based on the DTSDE.  No later than the beginning of the school year, the school must implement a whole school reform model (WSRM) aligned with the ESEA Flexibility Waiver Turnaround Principles. This requirement may also be met through implementation of a School Innovation Fund (SIF) or a 1003(g) School Improvement Grant (SIG) model.  District completes a school leader checklist (if the principal has been leader of school for more than two full academic years);  School implements an extended learning time program; and  District ensures that the staff at the school participate in mandatory professional development in support of the current or new plan. The District is eligible for 1003(a) and/or a 1003(g) school improvement grant if the school is Title I eligible. School is preliminarily identified for registration review. If school is placed under registration review, State led team visits school and recommends to the Commissioner whether the school should:  Continue to implement current plan as modified by recommendations of the team (e.g., a school implementing a SIG or SIF grant);  Implement a new “out of time” plan (e.g., an EPO or other alternative governance arrangement, conversion to charter school); or  Be phased out or closed. School must meet the principal checklist, extended learning time and professional development requirements for Priority Schools.

16 ESEA Renewal: Recommended Revisions Based on the first years of waiver implementation, the Department recommends changes to refine, simplify, and standardize the following: School and District Improvement Set-Asides Priority School Identification Focus School Identification Performance Index (PI) Double Testing Annual Measureable Objectives LAP School Identification and Support Progress Filters Focus School Removal and Replacement Sunset of Supplemental Education Services (SES) List of Providers 16

17 ESEA Renewal: Recommended Revisions 17 FuturePast Original Approved ESEA Waiver Districts were required to set aside an amount equal to between 5 and 15 percent of their Title I, IIA, and III (if applicable) funds to support Focus and Priority School activities and services from an NYSED approved list. Proposed ESEA Renewal Waiver Require districts to first do these things before being able to use 1003(a) funds for other purposes: Implement the DTSDE process, DCIP and SCEP; Review principals’ qualifications; Evaluate plan implementation; and Evaluate any costs associated with providing SED data on leading and lagging indicators in Priority and Focus Schools.

18 ESEA Renewal: Recommended Revisions Revisions to Required District Set-Asides In addition, districts will be required to use their 5-15 percent set-aside to fund Public School Choice and offer 200 hours of extended learning time to students in Priority Schools. If the cost of meeting those obligations goes beyond the district’s set- aside, the district must utilize other funds to meet these obligations. If funds earmarked for the set-aside remain after these obligations have been fulfilled, which will be the case for most Focus Districts, the funds are to be used to support implementation of turnaround principles or whole school reform models, address recommendations of DTSDE reviews, or support community school programs or the provisions of CTE or advanced coursework to high school students. 18

19 Revisions to Priority School Identification A new list of Priority Schools based on School Year assessment data. All public schools eligible for identification, including Schools In Good Standing. 19

20 Revisions to Focus School Identification Replace current complex formula based on percentage of students who are non-proficient/non-graduates with streamlined method. Within Focus Districts, identify any school as Focus that has one or more subgroups performing unacceptably. A Focus School may be identified for a different subgroup than that for which the District is identified. A Focus District may have no identified Focus Schools. 20

21 Revisions to Performance Index Eliminate the incorporation of “Growth to Proficiency” in computation of Grades 3-8 ELA and math Performance Index (PI). Continue to use Student Growth Percentiles (SGP) in making elementary and middle school accountability determinations. Modify PI to incorporate students with disabilities (SWD), English language learners (ELL), and Career and Technical Education (CTE) waiver amendments, if approved by USDE. 21

22 Double Testing Waiver 22 Previously, an annual application was required for grades 7 and 8 students who took the high school math Regents, so that they would not be required to take the grade level mathematics assessment. Currently, a four-year waiver will allow grades 7 and 8 students who take high school math Regents not to be required to take the grade level mathematics assessment.

23 Revisions to Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) 23 Elementary/ Middle Schools High Schools SWD, ELL and CTE results Set new AMOs for the through the school year based on school year results. Reset AMOs prior to as more students take the Common Core based Regents ELA and mathematics exams. Readjust AMOs as necessary to reflect any approved amendments in relation to assessments.

24 24 Revise LAP School identification process to: Ensure that all schools that would have been identified as Priority or Focus in a Focus District are identified as LAP in a non-Focus District. Ensure that schools with large gaps in performance between members of a subgroup and non-members of a subgroup are not identified, if members of the subgroup are performing well in relation to the rest of the state. Align the “Progress Filters” for LAP identification with those for Priority and Focus Schools. Base LAP identification for low-performance and large gaps in performance between subgroups on two years of performance and require two years of progress for removal. Provide 1003(a) School Improvement Grants to Title I LAP Schools. Revisions to Local Assistance Plan Identification and Supports

25 Revisions to Progress Filters 25 Progress Filters - alternate measures used to determine whether districts and schools have made sufficient progress so that even though the school or district may be low-performing for an accountability group on a performance measure that group’s performance is used to identify the district or school. Department proposes to: Standardize the filters used for Priority, Focus, and LAP Schools. Use Adequate Yearly Progress as a filter for Priority and Focus Schools. Key Progress Filters are: Group has made a ten point gain in the Performance Index from Prior Year. Median Student Growth Percentile is at or above Statewide average. Subgroups 4- or 5-year graduation rate is above Statewide average or has increased by ten percent over last two years. Subgroup has made AYP for past two years.

26 Revisions to Focus School Removal and Replacement 26 Eliminate requirement that in certain circumstances Districts must replace schools that are eligible for removal from Focus status with new Focus Schools. Note: New LAP rules may result in LAP Schools becoming Focus Schools.

27 Revisions to Supplemental Educational Services (SES) 27 New York’s ESEA Renewal Waiver proposes that, rather than being required to provide parents the choice to have their children receive tutorial services from any vendor on the State’s approved list that has agreed to serve that district, the district would decide the vendors from among whom parents could choose. As is now the case, districts that wish to enter into contracts with vendors to provide tutorial services to students who attend Priority or Focus Schools could continue to do so using Title I funds. Alternatively, districts could choose to instead use these funds to provide students with expanded learning time or other services. The Department proposes that it would no longer maintain a list of approved SES providers and would remove the current list from its website. Accordingly, staff recommended that the Board of Regents, in conjunction with submission of New York’s ESEA waiver application for the to school years, seek a legislative amendment to remove the state statutory requirement that the Commissioner approve SES providers.

28 ESEA Renewal: Consultation and Collaboration 28 Local Educational Agencies and organizations representing teachers, administrators, parents, community-based organizations, civil rights organizations, students with disabilities and English language learners have assisted the Department in responding to the requirements of the Renewal application. May March 2015: ESEA Think Tank January 2015: Work Group for Districts LAP Schools January 2015: DTSDE Institute January and February 2015: Title I Committee of Practitioners February 2015: Commissioner, Senior Deputy Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner meetings with stakeholders

29 29  Based on approval from the Regents, staff has released the February 2015 draft renewal request for public comment from February 13, February 26,  At the March , 2015 meeting of the Board, Department staff will provide a summary of the public comments received and any suggested revisions to the application based on those comments.  The Department will also present the proposed final draft of the ESEA Waiver Flexibility Request for Board of Regents approval at the March 2015 meeting prior to submission to the USDE. ESEA Renewal: Request for Public Comment


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