Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

“Activity, identity and meaning…". Sheds work because they are attractive places for men to gather socially, regularly, voluntarily, happily, safely and.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "“Activity, identity and meaning…". Sheds work because they are attractive places for men to gather socially, regularly, voluntarily, happily, safely and."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Activity, identity and meaning…"

2 Sheds work because they are attractive places for men to gather socially, regularly, voluntarily, happily, safely and do hands-on stuff together. Attracting men that are not accessing services Providing places to embed programmes and meet men ‘at home and on their terms Being able to be responsive to diverse men’s diverse needs at a local level Addressing the social determinants of health, often at lower cost or more effectively than statutory providers.

3 Work best when it’s grassroots, local, by, for and about the local men and the community. ‘Shedders’ are active and equal participants: not students, patients, clients or customers. Inclusive, fun and welcoming of all men. Do not see men as having ‘a deficit’ or being the problem. Sheds have tended to thrive in areas especially where ex-tradesmen are concentrated, hit by crisis & change and where the proportion of men ‘beyond’ paid work (unemployed, out of the workforce, retired) is higher than average).

4 Hands-on skills through practical, productive activity with social value and community benefits. The positive value of leisure activity & friendships with other men. Importance of health, fitness, relationships, identities as men & emotional wellbeing Coping with changes associated with bereavement, unemployment, separation, ageing, disability, recovery etc. Break social isolation & ‘underfoot syndrome’ Model positive and diverse masculinities Regularly participate & socialize in community settings with other men.

5 Lower Super Output Area (LSOA); Indices of Deprivation; JSNA; 2012 Community mental health profile for Norfolk Norwich City District Health Picture (NCDHP, March 2011); APHO Health priorities for Norfolk 2012 (Department of Health) Clearly established relationship between deprivation and poorer physical and mental health and wellbeing outcomes. Significant health inequalities locally. Ageing population with significant growth predicted will present challenges in terms of care and support requirements. Local health priorities include a need for improvements in healthy living, diet, exercise, smoking cessation, reduce alcohol consumption, support reductions in disease rates and help address the disproportionality seen in male life expectancy (between men as well as between men and women). Norfolk has levels of mental ill-health that are significantly above average (esp. male suicide & depression). National research suggests that men access mental health services less than women and there is a need for service provision to adapt more specifically to meet male need.

6 “Hugely advantageous for people to come into contact with others”. “Opportunity to go to a place that isn't about fixing me”. “I like the added community benefits”. “I like the possibility of inter-generational skills swaps and breaking down barriers.” “Offers an opportunity to create a therapeutic environment without the therapy!” “Will be something to get out of bed for”. “I would enjoy the fun and banter”. “Routine. Something to look forward too”. “Smaller sheds in a few places”. “I would want to dip in and out / drop in – as and when”. “No paperwork. No strings attached”. “Depends on my state of mind”. “I would want it to be practical but also non-competitive”. “Depends on what is available, when and who else is using it”. “There is a risk of reinforcing male specific socialization (lad behavior etc.)”. “Needs different activities and flexibility. Both unstructured and structured”. “I would go but depend who is there i.e. nice people. A friendly welcome would be very important”.

7 Time limited projects (i.e. yurt making) Wood working Ironmongers Aerial photography Model making Cooking Eco Group Drop in repair workshops. Tool recycling. Local skilled people passing on skills – cabinet makers. Furniture recycling. Building skills. Mechanics Small DIY projects.

8

9 First 18 months 25 men will develop new hands on skills through practical and productive activity leading to evidence of an increased sense of purpose and less social isolation. 70% will report increased levels of health and well-being resulting from their involvement 50% will increase their access to services and participation in other community based activities. 70% will report that they are coping better with recovery and changes associated with unemployment, separation, ageing, impairment and / or relationships as a result of the involvement in the MenShed.

10 To date – 6 months – monthly participant feedback 51 men having accessed the project; and over 20 attending regularly (more than once a week) 83% stated an increased sense of purpose and less social isolation 86% reported increased levels of health and well-being resulting from their involvement 60% said they have increased their access to services and participation in other community based activities. 81% report that they are coping better with recovery and changes as a result of their involvement in the MenShed.

11 Next phase Secure longer lease Strengthen sustainability through diverse funding mix including trading Further links with local services Self management & hand over Outcomes - “Activity, identity and meaning…" Andy Wood, Norwich Shed Coordinator / (01263)


Download ppt "“Activity, identity and meaning…". Sheds work because they are attractive places for men to gather socially, regularly, voluntarily, happily, safely and."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google