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American Public Health Association Conference Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 12, 2005 2:30 - 4:00 PM.

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Presentation on theme: "American Public Health Association Conference Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 12, 2005 2:30 - 4:00 PM."— Presentation transcript:

1 American Public Health Association Conference Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 12, :30 - 4:00 PM

2 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. 5 Learning Objectives Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

3 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. 5 Learning Objectives Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

4 Detectives in the Classroom Wendy Huebner, Ph.D. Montclair State University

5 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Young Epidemiology Scholars David Fraser, MD College Board and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

6 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 EXCITE Ralph Cordell, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

7 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. 5 Learning Objectives Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

8 Collectively Discuss the Challenges

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10 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. Epidemiology Education in Grades Learning Objectives

11 Empowers students to be scientifically literate participants in the democratic decision-making process concerning public health policy. Empowers students to make more informed personal health-related decisions. Increases students’ media literacy and their understanding of public health messages. Increases students’ understanding of the basis for determining risk. Improves students’ mathematical and scientific literacy. Expands students’ understanding of scientific methods and develops their critical thinking skills. Provides students with another mechanism for exploring important, real world questions about their health and the health of others. Introduces students to an array of career paths related to the public’s health. Top 8 Reasons for Teaching / Learning Epidemiology Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

12 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. Epidemiology Education in Grades Learning Objectives

13 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Detectives in the Classroom Wendy Huebner, Ph.D. Montclair State University

14 Detectives in the Classroom An Epidemiology Curriculum for Science, Mathematics, and Health Educators This project is supported by Science Education Partnership Awards, from the National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health. American Public Health Association Conference Philadelphia, PA December 12, 2005

15 Pedagogical Basis Enduring Understandings … the big ideas that reside at the heart of a discipline and have lasting value outside the classroom. Essential Questions … the questions, that when answered, create the enduring understandings. Content Make the content the answers to the questions. Detectives in the Classroom

16 Clues for formulating hypotheses can be found by describing a disease in terms of person, place and time. Prevention strategies can be evaluated scientifically. Costs and trade-offs are also considered. Hypothesized associations can be tested using observational studies. Causality must be considered as just one of several possible explanations for an association. Prevention strategies consider many societal factors as well as science. Who has the disease? When does it occur? Where does it occur? Did the prevention strategy work? Are the hypothesized cause and exposure associated with each other ? Is the association causal? What should be done when a preventable cause is identified? Pedagogical Basis Detectives in the Classroom Enduring UnderstandingsEssential Questions

17 Essential Question 1: Why do some people get sick while others remain healthy? Enduring Understanding 1: Clues for formulating hypotheses can be found by describing the way a disease is distributed in a population of people, in terms of person, place and time. Investigation 1-1: Why Are These Students Getting Sick? Investigation 1-2: In the News Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Investigation 1-4: Amy Investigation 1-5: A Mysterious Ailment Investigation 1-6: Concept Connections Module 1 Detectives in the Classroom

18 Person, Place and Time (PPT) Person: Place: Time: Who? Where? When? Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? PPT Sheet Whistles

19 Person, Place, and Time Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? PPT Sheet Person: Time: Lifeguards, Drum Majors, Referees, Coaches, Traffic Policemen Pools, seashore, gymnasiums, athletic fields, intersections Hot days, schooldays, after school, holidays Whistles Place: Handout

20 Hypotheses for Card 1 Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis?

21 Card / GroupHypotheses Grass / Soil Grass Grass / Leaves / Dirt XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Grass / Dirt Grass / Trees Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Hypotheses for Card 1

22 Card / GroupHypotheses Grass / Soil Grass Grass / Leaves / Dirt XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Grass / Dirt Grass / Trees Lawn Treatment Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? 1

23 Hypotheses for Card 2

24 Card / GroupHypotheses Aerosol poisoning / fumes from chemicals / make-up / hair dryer Make up XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Hair sprays / gels XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Brush / hairspray Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Hypotheses for Card 2

25 Card / GroupHypotheses Make up XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Hair sprays / gels XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Brush / hairspray Hair Spray Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? 2 Aerosol poisoning / fumes from chemicals / make-up / hair dryer

26 Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Hypotheses for Card 3 3

27 Card / GroupHypotheses Alcoholic beverages Alcohol Alcohol / Food poisoning / Drug-smoking Music Alcohol / Drinks / Food / Music XXXXXXXXXXX Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Hypotheses for Card 3 3

28 Card / GroupHypotheses Alcoholic beverages Alcohol Alcohol / Food poisoning / Drug-smoking Music Alcohol / Drinks / Food / Music XXXXXXXXXXX Alcoholic Beverages Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? 3 3

29 Hypotheses for Card 4 4

30 Card / GroupHypotheses Pillows Blankets Pillow / Blanket Joint stiffness / Bed bugs Blankets / Pillows XXXXXXXXXXXX Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Hypotheses for Card 4 4

31 Card / GroupHypotheses Pillows Blankets Pillow / Blanket Joint stiffness / Bed bugs Blankets / Pillows XXXXXXXXXXXX Electric Blankets Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? 4 4

32 Essential Question 1: Why do some people get sick while others remain healthy? Enduring Understanding 1: Clues for formulating hypotheses can be found by describing the way a disease is distributed in a population of people, in terms of person, place and time. Investigation 1-1: Why Are These Students Getting Sick? Investigation 1-2: In the News Investigation 1-3: What’s My Hypothesis? Investigation 1-4: The Case of Amy Investigation 1-5: A Mysterious Ailment Investigation 1-6: Concept Connections Module 1 Detectives in the Classroom

33 PPT and Hypotheses Place 20 states, 7 countries NY (20%), CA (22%) FL (7%), NJ (6%), TX 3% SF, LA, NYC Equatorial Africa Time November 1982 Young Men Homosexuals (403) Bisexuals (54) Heterosexuals (86) Hemophiliacs (3) IV Drug Users Haitian Immigrants EPI 101 – Descriptive Epidemiology Person (n = 608)

34 Descriptive Epi Whistles Person: Place: Time: Who? Where? When? Shaking HandsToilet seats Poppers Injection Needles Mosquito Bites What’s My Hypothesis? Detectives in the Classroom - Investigation 1-5: A Mysterious Ailment

35 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

36 Young Epidemiology Scholars A program of the College Board and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

37 Genesis Prize competition in epidemiology to attract bright students into population health High school curriculum in epidemiology (1) to prepare students for the competition (2) generally to enhance scientific literacy

38 Focus groups - form Variety of high schools: rural-urban, public- private, magnet-marginal, E-W-N-S Variety of teachers: math, biology, social science, environmental science, health ed. What is epidemiology? What epidemiology is already taught? What additional epidemiologic ideas could usefully be added? What resources would be helpful?

39 Focus groups - feedback Epidemiology is interesting (and parts are already taught under different names) Curriculum is crowded; standards constrain Do not create a course or textbook 1-3 day modules could fit into existing courses in various disciplines Cite standards that each module helps meet Provide intellectual framework, training

40 Working Group - people Mona Baumgarten (U MD) Manuel Bayona (UNT) Diane Marie St. George (Walden U) Paul Stolley (U MD) Flora Huang (Biology Stuyvesant HS, NYC) Mark Kaelin (Montclair State) Felicia McCrary (History, Galloway School, Atlanta) Chris Olsen (Math/Stat, George Washington HS, Cedar Rapids)

41 Working Group - form Identify key epidemiological principles Work in teacher-epidemiologist pairs Rotate pairs to get creative mix Choose topics/formats that would interest HS students Use matrix (principles x modules) to track Provide intellectual framework

42 Working Group - product 27 web-based modules (incl. 2 from Lloyd Novick) Biology (15), social science (14), math/stat (13), environ. science (10), health ed. (4), English (1) Study design (11), descriptive epidemiology (11), science and policy (10) Case definition, hypothesis testing, measures of association, causation, bias, confounding, screening, epidemic investigation, ethics, risk-benefit, racial and ethnic disparities, prevention, molecular epidemiology

43 Working Group - examples Mock court (Alpine Fizz [Mountain Dew] and Male Infertility) Review of original archival documents (Tuskegee Syphilis Study) Manipulation of actual data from an epidemic investigation to identify the source (An Outbreak of Legionnaires’ Disease).

44 Adolescent suicide unit (1) Question 6. Examine the first two columns in Table 1. If you were to consider only the mortality rates, would you conclude that suicide is an important public health problem for children and teens aged 10–19?

45 Adolescent suicide unit (2) Question 7. Describe how the mortality rates vary by age group. Then describe how the percent of all deaths varies by age group. Explain the differences in the two patterns.

46 Adolescent suicide unit (3) Question 8. How does consideration of the percent of all deaths affect your conclusion about whether suicide should be regarded as an important public health problem in children and teens aged 10– 19?

47 Adolescent suicide unit (4) Question 15. Calculate the odds ratio for substance abuse. Explain in words the answer you get. Question 16. Examine the results in Table 3. According to this study, what are the two strongest risk factors for suicide in males?

48 YES Competition Research projects by HS juniors and seniors 650 applicants in judged by panel of teachers & epidemiologists Top 120 get scholarships 60 regional finalists go to Washington, DC for oral presentation at regional and national finals Prizes range from $1000 for regional semi- finalists to $50,000 for 2 national winners

49 YES Competition – National Winners Jessica Cohen of Roslyn Heights, NY: “The impact of condom education on high school students” Andreea Seicean of Bayville, OH: “A significant association between short sleeping hours and teens overweight/obesity: results from Bay High School”

50 YES Competition - Selected Other National Finalists “Fatal motor vehicle accidents increase after the fall and spring time changes” “Disease propagation through connective paths: application of the small world theory to epidemic modeling.” “Asthma disparities in Fresno unified school district: mapping socioeconomic status and prevalence”

51 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 EXCITE Ralph Cordell, Ph.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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56 CDC’s Framework for Science Education Curriculum Development Family, Community, & Partners Interscholastic Activities & Competitions Colleges & Universities Media Student Development School Involvement TeacherDevelopment

57 Teacher Development Accomplishments –Provided training to >3000 teachers through Hammond Coaches Clinic –Science Ambassador Program Need to – Foster teacher training opportunities within CDC and within other health agencies

58 Extracurricular Activities Participant at the Prom Nightmare, cosponsored by OSE and the National Council of the Girl Scouts of the United States

59 Science Olympiad For the last 5 years, OSE has brought the winning team of the National Disease Detectives Competition to Atlanta. Two of the 10 winners brought to Atlanta have returned for summer internships.

60 Curriculum Development Accomplishments –Middle school curriculum –Series of lesson plans on line EXCITE Science Ambassador Need –Expand to high school –Broaden to cover math for both levels

61 Middle School Mock Foodborne Outbreak

62 Middle school class doing mock foodborne outbreak exercise Disease Detectives Middle School Curriculum

63 Student being “Tested” for Food Poisoning

64 1.Consider the public health and educational rationale for teaching epidemiology to students in grades Review selected grades 6-12 epidemiology curricula. 3.Participate in components of lessons from the above curricula. 4.Identify the challenges to infusing epidemiology education into an already packed school curriculum at a time when standardize testing is of increasing importance. 5.Explore ways the public health community can address these challenges. 5 Learning Objectives Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12

65 Empowers students to be scientifically literate participants in the democratic decision-making process concerning public health policy. Empowers students to make more informed personal health-related decisions. Increases students’ media literacy and their understanding of public health messages. Increases students’ understanding of the basis for determining risk. Improves students’ mathematical and scientific literacy. Expands students’ understanding of scientific methods and develops their critical thinking skills. Provides students with another mechanism for exploring important, real world questions about their health and the health of others. Introduces students to an array of career paths related to the public’s health. Top 8 Reasons for Teaching / Learning Epidemiology Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Handout

66 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Connect the Dots

67 Goals Infuse epidemiology education into curricula in grades Improve scientific literacy. Increase the number of students preparing for careers in public health. Epidemiology Education Movement

68 Obtain support of stakeholders (educators, epidemiologists, public health community, professional organizations, scientific journals, government). Create Demand Infuse into educational structure (state / national standards, standardized testing, textbooks). Develop mechanisms to focus and coordinate efforts of many interested but busy stakeholders. Maintain Momentum Develop mechanisms to make people aware of the efforts of others (web site, newsletter, list serve). Goals Infuse epidemiology education into curricula in grades Improve scientific literacy. Increase the number of students preparing for careers in public health. Assess Short and Long Term Goals Develop Curricula Implement teacher training workshops in a variety of venues. Prepare Teachers Implement demonstration projects in a variety of school and non-school venues. Create new curricula and enhance existing curricula. Develop cadre of epidemiology curriculum developers. Evaluate curricula. Epidemiology Education Movement Handout Concept Map

69 Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Change the map. Identify other steps to take. Prioritize the steps. Identify opportunities for the public health community to participate. Using the concept map as a point of departure,

70 Goals Infuse epidemiology education into curricula in grades Improve scientific literacy. Increase the number of students preparing for careers in public health. Create new curricula and enhance existing curricula. Implement teacher training workshops in a variety of venues. Develop cadre of epidemiology curriculum developers. Obtain support of stakeholders (educators, epidemiologists, public health community, professional organizations, scientific journals, government). Develop mechanisms to focus and coordinate efforts of many interested but busy stakeholders. Assess Short and Long Term Goals Create Demand Prepare Teachers Develop Curricula Epidemiology Education Movement Maintain Momentum Implement demonstration projects in a variety of school and non-school venues. Evaluate curricula. Infuse into educational structure (state / national standards, standardized testing, textbooks). Develop mechanisms to make people aware of the efforts of others (web site, newsletter, list serve).

71 And friends they may think it's a movement.” Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Epidemiology Education Movement Alice's Restaurant, Arlo Guthrie “And can you imagine fifty people a day; I said fifty people a day, Walking in singing a bar of Alice's Restaurant and walking out.

72 Epidemiology Education Movement Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Keep in touch?

73 American Public Health Association Conference Epidemiology Education in Grades 6-12 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania December 12, :30 - 4:00 PM Thank You


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