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FIPP 2001 New Technologies Helping to Print Magazines.

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Presentation on theme: "FIPP 2001 New Technologies Helping to Print Magazines."— Presentation transcript:

1 FIPP 2001 New Technologies Helping to Print Magazines

2 DRUPA World’s Largest Print Exposition Druck und Papier DR U PA

3 DRUPA 2000 The Promise: Millennium Blow-Out Event The Reality: Technological Disappointment

4 The Digitization of Print Global information transfer makes print truly global. Technology is shrink-wrapped and universal, expensive and competitive. The printing press is just another office machine. Distinction between processes are blurring. Distribution cost is determining factor. 10 Years Into the Program

5 The Digitization of Print

6 The Digitization of Prepress Computer-to-Plate Disadvantages For smaller printers, there’s no true labor savings Startup cost: Minimum $600,000 to $1.2 million –Cost doesn’t reflect required redundancy Ongoing maintenance: Minimum $72,000/year

7 The Digitization of Prepress Computer-to-Plate Advantages Improved registration, consistency –No dirt Enhanced flexibility and speed –Clients can submit files later Reduced press down time/waste

8 Digital Plate Production vs. Press Down Time Shown in Percentages 2,000/day = 700,000/year 80 bad plates/day = $$$$

9 The Digitization of Prepress Computer-to-Plate Advantages 20 – 20 – percent reduction of cycle time per year, per year, per year “Every monthly produced like a weekly; every weekly produced like a daily.”

10 Prepress Advancements Stochastic Screening Screenless –No film –No rosetta pattern Improved resolution –360 line screen vs. 133 –Better quality and appearance Barrier to introduction: Press chemistry

11 Half Tone vs. Stochastic More/Less Dots vs. Bigger/Smaller Dots StochasticConventional

12 Closed-Loop Color Control The Revolution “God makes no two trees alike.”

13 Even though solid ink densities may be in tolerance, shifts in the CMY color balance of images can significantly affect their appearance. Critical Balance

14 Color Control System Automatically identifies and corrects color Delivers higher color consistency and predictability Reduces makeready time, paper waste Statistical data reporting capabilities Color info is fed back to Imaging for improving subsequent jobs

15 Manual Operator Moves - Cyan All Keys / Single Unit Time Solid Ink Densities

16 Automatic Moves – Cyan Test Conditions: MAN Roland Lithoman 4-unit, single web; cold start-up; no presetting; automatic convergence. Observations: CCS Automatically brought all keys to 1.4 target (SWOP) in under 5 minutes. All Keys / Single Unit Time Solid Ink Densities

17 So What Does It All Mean? Color is predictable, repeatable, less variable The color you approve on proof is the color you see on press Digital measurement of optical characteristics means accurate color can be replicated in publisher’s office (vs. press side) One color okay does it all! –Color can be replicated across multiple presses anywhere throughout the world

18 DBLs Online (Digital Bluelines) Real-time content proofing Approaches: – QG.com (secure Web site) – Electronic Data Interchange – File Transfer Protocol (FTP) site –

19 DBL Benefits Electronic client signoff –Immediately alerts QG production crews –No delays –Instantaneous vs. 48 hours

20 Digital File Transfer Seamlessly connects all printing plants and remote imaging sites to each other throughout U.S. and world Seamlessly connects all publishers to printing plants and remote imaging sites FREE and INSTANTANEOUSLY using FTP via the Internet

21 Digital Connectivity

22 Pressroom Advancements Trend is toward wider presses –More pages per revolution = higher output –Reduces costs

23 2 x 2 Presses 17 x 22 Sheetfed –4 pages/plate –One-sided printing Mini/Custom Web Press –4 pages/plate –Perfecting 4 Pages Total 8 Pages Total

24 2 x 4 Presses 8 unit M-1000 Press –8 pages/plate –Perfecting 4 unit M-1000 Press –8 pages/plate –Perfecting 24 x 40 Sheetfed –8 pages/plate –One-sided printing 8 Pages Total 16 Pages Total 32 Pages Total

25 2 x 6 Presses 8 unit M-3000 Press –12 pages/plate –Perfecting 4 unit M-3000 Press –12 pages/plate –Perfecting 24 Pages Total 48 Pages Total

26 4 x 6 Presses 4 unit M-4000 Press –24 pages/plate –Perfecting 48 Pages Total

27 6 x 8 Presses 8 unit 96” Gravure Press –48 pages/cylinder –1 web –Perfecting 96 Pages Total

28 32 Pages Sheetfed2 x 4 x 1 to 25M M-1000 (1 web)2 x 4 x 1 25M - 100M M-1000 (2 web)2 x 4 x 2 100M - 2 million Gravure (96 pp)6 x 8 x 1 2 million +

29 48 Pages Sheetfed2 x 4 x 1to 20M M-4000 (1 web)4 x 6 x 120M – 250M M-3000 (2 webs)2 x 6 x 2250M – 1.4 million Gravure (96 pp)6 x 8 x 11.4 million +

30 96 Pages Sheetfed2 x 4 x 1to 15M M-4000 (1 web)4 x 6 x 115M – 250M M-3000 (2 webs)2 x 6 x 2250M – 1 million Gravure (96 pp)6 x 8 x 11 million +

31 Magnabind A Revolution in Binding Operates on perfect binding principle of gathering as few as two pages, which simplifies book layouts Rated at 40,000 books/hour Can bind less than 1/8" up to a 1/2"

32 Magnabind

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35 Forecast for the Future Less run waste Quicker makereadies and less makeready waste Improved consistency and color quality

36 Think Out of the Box 15-minute plate changes 1,000-sheet makereadies! Less insert makeup and bindery slow-down Move versioning back to the pressroom

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