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Food & Fitness Coalition Vision: Residents of Benton and Franklin Counties make healthy food choices and lead physically active lives. Mission: To promote.

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Presentation on theme: "Food & Fitness Coalition Vision: Residents of Benton and Franklin Counties make healthy food choices and lead physically active lives. Mission: To promote."— Presentation transcript:

1 Food & Fitness Coalition Vision: Residents of Benton and Franklin Counties make healthy food choices and lead physically active lives. Mission: To promote policies that support and create an environment for healthy food choices and physical activity. January Food & Fitness Coalition of the Benton-Franklin Community Health Alliance The Role of the Food & Fitness Coalition Take a look at these recent local articles highlighting the importance of health in the community! childhood.html#storylink=misearch programs/http://www.tricitiesbusinessnews.com/2011/12/local-compannies-see-benefits-of-workplace-wellness- programs/ Kennewick Food Bank Update The WSU Nursing Program and the Kennewick Food Bank are building a partnership to enable nursing students to share health information with the food bank recipients. Michelle McKinney is a Registered Nurse and is coming back to WSU to earn her bachelor’s degree. She is currently take a course that requires her to spend 100 hours in community nursing. To achieve this, Michelle will be working at the Kennewick food bank. She will do blood pressure screenings and encourage people to have a primary care physician. In addition, she will be handing out the new USDA’s “My Plate” coloring pages to help spread the word about eating healthy foods and choosing foods from the appropriate groups. The Kennewick Food Bank and the WSU Nursing Program are excited about this blossoming partnership and the opportunity to spread health information to the community. January 2012 Meeting January 10, :30 pm Corrado Building 800 Swift Blvd, Ste 370 Update on Kadlec’s Health Risk Assessment Program Sandy Rock, Guest Speaker on Social Determinants of Health Worksite Wellness Project

2 January Food & Fitness Coalition of the Benton-Franklin Community Health Alliance Congratulations John Rhode! John is a Tri-City native who recently dropped 220 pounds and won the titled of “Biggest Loser” on the NBC Show Biggest Loser. Way to go! The Food & Fitness Coalition sent him a congratulatory letter. Member Spotlight: Ryan Vogt Fitness Director at the Tri-City Court Club since October My job description is vast but my passion is focused. I manage our Results Personal Training, Thin & Healthy’s Total Solutions and training of our sales team. My passion is to get people involved in health and fitness. I excel at community events, incentive programs within our Club setting. I graduated from Western Baptist College in Salem, Oregon (Now Corban College). I have my BS in Sports and Fitness Management and am certified through the National Academy of Sports Medicine as a personal trainer since I have spent the last 15 years working in health clubs and growing in my career. Another passion is public presentations and writing. My passion for fitness stems from my involvement in sports as a child. I was always the heaviest in class and was made fun of…but when it came to sports I excelled. This drove me to be in better physical fitness. I played basketball in college and have remained active in sports for myself and also my children. Taking care of myself is important as my whole family has battled with their own weight. My father also passed away two years ago of a heart attack at age 64. I personally like to set a great example for my family and those people I come into contact with at the gym and in the community. My wife (Kara) attended culinary school and is a great cook and uses mostly fresh whole foods. I exercise moderately and stay motivated by training for sport and fun activities. I hope to run in Hood to Coast Fitness Tip: Weight Training Principle #1: Quality is more important than quantity. A resistance-training program that does not focus on technique gets you results much more slowly and may put you at risk for injury. Here are some very important technique tips: Quality and execution of movement is critical. It makes no sense to perform 12 sloppy reps. It is far better to perform 8 reps with perfect form and then take a break. Take it slow. Proper weight training is not a fast sport. In fact Wayne Westcott, a leading strength and conditioning researcher, has determined that one repetition should take approximately 5-6 seconds; that is 2 seconds to lift the weight and 4 seconds to slowly lower the weight in a controlled fashion. Most people lift too quickly using momentum instead of muscle. A proper set of 8-12 repetitions should take approximately 1 minute to complete. Proper execution of each rep is the most critical factor in weight training. Breathe. A proper breathing rhythm makes each set more effective. Focus on exhaling as you lift the weight or when you exert and inhale as you recover or lower the weight. Sit up straight. Proper posture is critical to ensure you are working the correct muscle groups and not putting your body at risk for injury. Keep your abdominals contracted throughout the entire set of exercises. Pull them up and in towards your spine to help stabilize your trunk. Keep your shoulders back and chest lifted up and out when doing seated, bent over or standing exercise.

3 Food & Fitness Coalition of the Benton-Franklin Community Health Alliance January Business of the Month: Schreiber & Sons Schreiber & Sons Farm is located 16 miles north of Pasco, 0.25 miles east of the intersection of Taylor Flats and Ringold Road. Alan Schreiber grew up on a farm in Missouri with three crops: corn, soybeans and alfalfa. He received his PhD in entomology and after working for EPA in Washington DC, came west to work as a researcher and professor for Washington State University. Alan is still amazed at the diversity of crops grown in this area and cultivates his interest on a personal as well as professional level. In 1998, Alan and his wife, Tanya established Agriculture Development Group, Inc., an agriculture research and consulting company. ADG has been conducting research on about 30 commodities each year on a 100-acre farm near Eltopia. In 2004, Schreiber & Sons was established to grow and market commercial crops including eggplant and okra. In 2006 Schreiber & Sons CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) was formed. Alan's sons Drew and Julian spend as much time as they can working with their dad on the farm and have even set up their own vegetable stand on occasion. Schreiber & Sons Farm produces a wide variety of mostly organic fruit, vegetables and herbs for the local market. They sell to farmer’s markets, local restaurants and their 350 member CSA. They host monthly tours for the local schools, boy scouts, CSA members and the general public to educate children on farming. They donate surplus produce to the Second Harvest food bank and to the Pasco First Lutheran Church’s efforts to feed the poorest of the poor in the community. Schreiber & Sons Community Supported Agriculture began giving Tri-Cities families a chance to share in local farming in For a fee, CSA members receive a box of seasonal produce every week during the 28 week harvest season, which stretches from May through November. They offer small, medium and large shares. Members will receive newsletters via that may include nutritional information, recipes and serving suggestions for featured items. Member’s families will become part of a local community that appreciates fresh produce and values agriculture. Top Ten Reasons to Eat Local with Schreiber & Sons CSA: 1.Eat Fresh! Most produce is picked within 48 hours of delivery. 2.Buying local produce helps keep your food dollars in the community. 3.Food grown locally is more nutritious than food trucked or flown from a thousand miles away. 4.Largest selection of organic produce in the Tri-Cities. 5.Enjoy the option of sourcing local artisanal breads, free range eggs, chicken and beef. 6.Join a food community; be part of a farm, participate in farm events. 7.Local produce simply tastes better. 8.Be a culinary adventurer – eat food that no one else has access to. 9.Shop less at the grocery store. 10.Delivered! There are 8 pickup sites to choose from. Visit their website at for more information and to register for the 2012 CSA.www.schreiberandsons.com

4 Food & Fitness Coalition of the Benton-Franklin Community Health Alliance January Food for Fitness! Winter Vegetables Kale: A rich source of minerals and tastes sweetest in the winter Leeks: Adds delicious flavor to many recipes Radicchio: A bitter type of lettuce Radishes: Mostly used in green salads and veggie trays, but can also be used as a side dish Rutabaga: Another root vegetable Turnips: Smaller turnips are usually tastier than larger ones Winter Fruits Grapefruit: Try mixing this with other fruits for a healthy dessert Lemons: Whip up a batch of lemon bars Oranges: Packed full of Vitamin C! Tangerines: Stick in your lunch for a quick snack Contact us: Co-Chair: Ryan Vogt ext 127 or Newsletter Editor: Lindsay Asmus or Executive Director, Benton Franklin Community Health Alliance Carol Moser or Visit our Facebook page! https://www.facebook.com/pages/Food-Fitness-Coalition- BFCHA/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Food-Fitness-Coalition- BFCHA/ Call for Submissions! Please forward any information, pictures, articles to Lindsay (contact info on page 1) and she will do her best to post it in upcoming newsletter editions. New Event Coming to the Tri-Cities! HeartChase Tri-Cities March 24, 2012 A FUNdraiser for the American Heart Association


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