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5-1 Developing a Negotiating Style CHAPTER 5. 5-2 Exhibit 5-2: Subset of Social Values CHAPTER 5 Source: Adapted from McClintock, C. G., & Van Avaermet,

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Presentation on theme: "5-1 Developing a Negotiating Style CHAPTER 5. 5-2 Exhibit 5-2: Subset of Social Values CHAPTER 5 Source: Adapted from McClintock, C. G., & Van Avaermet,"— Presentation transcript:

1 5-1 Developing a Negotiating Style CHAPTER 5

2 5-2 Exhibit 5-2: Subset of Social Values CHAPTER 5 Source: Adapted from McClintock, C. G., & Van Avaermet, E. (1982). Social values and rules of fairness: A theoretical perspective. In V. J. Derlega and J. Grzelak (Eds.), Cooperation and helping behavior (pp. 43–71). New York: Academic Press. Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

3 5-3 Exhibit 5-3: Motivational Styles CHAPTER 5 Objective View of others Situational factors that trigger this MO IndividualisticCompetitiveCooperative Motivational Style Self-interested Group competition When organizations make interpersonal comparisons salient Victory Joint welfare Competitive Heterogeneous: Some cooperators, some competitive; some individualistic Incentives to maximize own gain Social identity; superordinate goals Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

4 5-4 Strategic Issues Concerning Motivational Style The myth of the hard bargainer Do not lose sight of your own interests Social comparison can cause breakdowns in negotiation Use reinforcement to shape behavior The power of reciprocity Anticipate motivational clashes at the bargaining table Motivational convergence Epistemic motivation CHAPTER 5 Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

5 5-5 Exhibit 5-6: Interests, Rights, and Power Approaches to Negotiation CHAPTER 5 Approach InterestsRightsPower GoalSelf-interestFairnessWinning Dispute resolutionJusticeRespect Understanding others’ concerns Temporal focus Present (What needs and interests do we have right now?) Past (What has been dictated by the past?) Future (What steps can I take in the future to overpower others?) Distributive strategies (pie slicing) Compromise Often produces a “winner” and a “loser;” thus, unequal distribution Integrative strategies (pie expansion) Most likely to expand the pie via addressing parties’ underlying needs Difficult to expand the pie unless focus is on interests Implications for future negotiations and relationship Greater understanding Satisfaction Stability of agreement Possible court action Resentment Possible retaliation Revenge Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

6 5-6 Strategic Issues Concerning Approaches Principle of reciprocity Interests are effective for pie expansion Refocusing your opponent on interests (away from rights and power) Personal strategies Structural strategies High costs associated with power and rights Know when to use rights and power Know how to use rights and power CHAPTER 5 Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

7 5-7 CHAPTER 5 Exhibit 5-10: Distinct Emotions Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Source: Posner, J. Russell, J. A., & Peterson, B. S. (2005). The circumplex model of affect: Anintegrative approach to affective neuroscience, cognitive development, and psychopathology. Development and Psychopathology,17, 715–734.

8 5-8 Exhibit 5-11: Emotional Styles CHAPTER 5 Focus Distributive strategies (pie slicing) Integrative strategies (pie expansion) Rational PositiveNegative Emotional Style Conceal or repress emotion Create positive emotion in other party Create rapport Use irrational-appearing emotions to intimidate or control other party Implications for future negotiations and relationship Citing norms of fair distribution Systematic analysis of interests Not likely to say or do anything regrettable, but also may come across as “distant” Compromise for the sake of the relationship Positive emotion stimulates creative thinking Greater feelings of commitment to relationship partner Threats Often tough bargaining Negative emotion may inhibit integrative bargaining Pressure to carry out threats or lose credibility Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

9 5-9 Exhibit 5-12: Emotional Style Questionnaire CHAPTER 5 Read each statement and indicate whether you think it is true or false for you in a negotiation situation. 1. In a negotiation situation, it is best to “keep a cool head.” 2. I believe that in negotiations you can “catch more flies with honey.” 3. It is important to me that I maintain control in a negotiation situation. 4. Establishing a positive sense of rapport with the other party is key to effective negotiation. 5. I am good at displaying emotions in negotiation to get what I want. 6. Emotions are the downfall of effective negotiation. 7. I definitely believe that the “squeaky wheel gets the grease” in many negotiation situations. 8. If you are nice in negotiations, you can get more than if you are cold or neutral. 9. In negotiation, you have to “fight fire with fire.” 10. I honestly think better when I am in a good mood. 11. I would never want to let the other party know how I really felt in a negotiation. 12. I believe that in negotiations, you can “catch more flies with a fly swatter.” 13. I have used emotion to manipulate others in negotiations. 14. I believe that good moods are definitely contagious. 15. It is very important to make a very positive first impression when negotiating. 16. The downfall of many negotiators is that they lose personal control in a negotiation. 17. It is best to keep a “poker face” in negotiation situations. 18. It is very important to get the other person to respect you when negotiating. 19. I definitely want to leave the negotiation with the other party feeling good. 20. If the other party gets emotional, you can use it to your advantage in a negotiation. 21. I believe that it is important to “get on the same wavelength” as the other party. 22. It is important to demonstrate “resolve” in a negotiation. 23. If I sensed that I was not under control, I would call a temporary halt to the negotiation. 24. I would not hesitate to make a threat in a negotiation situation if I felt the other party would believe it. Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

10 5-10 Exhibit 5-11: Emotional Style Questionnaire Scoring Yourself CHAPTER 5 Computing your “R” score: Look at items #1, #3, #6, #11, #16, #17, #20, #23. Give yourself 1 point for every “true” answer and subtract 1 point for every “false” answer. Then combine your scores for your R score (rational). Computing your “P” score: Look at items #2, #4, #8, #10, #14, #15, #19, #21. Give yourself 1 point for every “true” answer and subtract 1 point for every “false” answer. Then combine your scores for your P score (positive). Computing your “N” score: Look at items #5, #7, #9, #12, #13, #18, #22, #24. Give yourself 1 point for every “true” answer and subtract 1 point for every “false” answer. Then combine your scores for your N score (negative). Instructor’s Manual with Overheads to accompanyCopyright ©2012 Pearson Education, The Mind and Heart of the Negotiator 5/e (Thompson) Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

11 5-11 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright ©2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall CHAPTER 5


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