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Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. I’ll Trade Ya’!

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Presentation on theme: "Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. I’ll Trade Ya’!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt

2 I’ll Trade Ya’!

3 Which trades did you make in this game that you would have made in real life? Which trades did you make that you would not have made in real life? Think about one trade that you made. If that were a real-life trade, how would it have affected your life?

4 I’ll Trade Ya’! As we read Tuck Everlasting, pay attention to the “trades” that the different characters make or would like to make. Think about how those trades affect their lives. What is the author trying to tell us about the impact of decisions/choices on our lives (the “trades” that we make)?

5 What’s Fair and What’s Not? What do we learn about the impact of decisions/choices on our lives (the “trades” that we make)? How does this story address our darkest fears and greatest hopes? What do we learn about the real world and how it should be lived?

6 Prologue – Setting the Stage There are twelve months in the year. August is in the middle of the year. January February March April May June July August September October November December

7 August January December The months of the year go round and round, starting over every year, just like someone riding a ferris wheel over and over. The cycle keeps repeating.

8 Summer Spring Winter As the months go by, the seasons change. Every year, the cycle repeats. We go through the seasons in the same order, year after year. Fall (Autumn)

9 August Jan. The story of Tuck Everlasting starts in the middle of a year’s cycle – in August. It is like the turning point in the year, when summer is about to turn into fall. Dec.

10 Before and After August The weather in the spring before we get to August is mostly “balmy,” which means breezy, cool, and refreshing. January February March April May June July August September October November December The weather after August, as we head into fall, again becomes cooler, and a chill returns to the air. spring autumn January February March April May June July August September October November December

11 But at the end of summer during the month of August, it is so hot that people don’t want to even move.  It’s the time of year when you wish it would rain to give you relief from the heat.  You get excited when you see lightning in the sky because you think it might rain... but the rain never comes.  Sometimes the heat makes people crabby.  Everyone and everything feels tense and on-edge because it’s hot, and there seems to be no relief in sight. August

12 This Time of Year is Sometimes Called the “Dog Days of Summer” In ancient times, different groups of people in different parts of the world drew images in the sky by “connecting the dots” of stars. These star pictures are now called constellations. The brightest of the stars in the constellation called Canis Major (“the big dog”) is Sirius, which also happens to be the brightest star in the night sky.

13 Dog Days of Summer In the summer, Sirius, called the “dog star,” rises and sets with the sun. Ancient people believed that the heat of Sirius, added to the heat of the sun, created a stretch of hot and sultry weather. They named this period of time in which we have such hot temperatures “the dog days of summer” after Sirius, the “dog star.”

14 August January December Tuck Everlasting starts in the month of August, when the characters are stuck in the heat of the “dog days of summer.” It is kind of like they are stuck at the top of a ferris wheel.

15 Dig In! Read the first paragraph on page 3. What types of connections do you see between the ideas we’ve discussed and the ideas in this paragraph?

16 Then Three Things Happened... (p. 3, paragraphs 2 – 5) Dawn Noon Sunset

17 hub p. 4 No connection, you would agree. But things can come together in strange ways. The wood was at the center, the hub of the wheel. All wheels must have a hub. A Ferris wheel has one, as the sun is the hub of the wheeling calendar. Fixed points they are, and the best left undisturbed, for without them, nothing holds together. But sometimes people find this out too late.

18 FORESHADOWING ALERT! “These are strange and breathless days, the dog days, when people are led to do things they are sure to be sorry for after.” “…Mae Tuck…Winnie Foster…a stranger…. No connection, you would agree. But things can come together in strange ways.” “Fixed points they are, and best left undisturbed, for without them, nothing holds together. But sometimes people find this out too late.” What tone/mood does the author immediately create? suspenseful, eerie, foreboding

19 What questions do you have after reading the prologue?

20 PROLOGUE CHAPTERS 5-25 – Characters begin to come together and the “plot thickens.” EPILOGUE CHAPTER 1: Setting (sets up contrast between the Treegap woods and the town/people) CHAPTER 2: Introduces Mae and Angus Tuck CHAPTER 3: Introduces Winnie Foster CHAPTER 4: Introduces the stranger (the man in the yellow suit)

21 a · brupt · ly ( ə· brupt′ ·lē ) Chapter 1

22 abruptly ( ə· brupt′ ·lē ) Part of speech: Adverb Definition: suddenly, unexpectedly Example: I was caught outside without an umbrella when the weather changed abruptly. Ask: What could be the consequences if a car abruptly changed lanes on the highway? Related word: abrupt Other meaning: behaving or speaking in an unfriendly or bad-tempered manner

23 gallows

24 Chapter 1 In the first chapter, Natalie Babbitt describes the road that leads to the town of Treegrap, where part of the action in the novel occurs. A herd of cows walked along the same way over and over until they created a relaxed, curving path that went across the top of a hill and across a meadow. Then the path got wider, as if the cows stopped for a while and spread out to chew on the grass and relax. After that, the path kept going until it came to the woods. Can you picture this path in your mind?

25 Chapter 1 BUT… when the path reached the woods, it went around the woods instead of going through the woods. On the other side of the woods, the road no longer belonged to the cows. It belonged to people. On this side of the woods, the mood changed. It was suddenly very hot, dusty, and ragged-looking. On the left of the road, the first house that you came to was a square cottage that had a perfect yard of grass surrounded by an iron fence. The house gave off the feeling like it didn’t want people to visit or hang out there. The road then went past the house, past more cottages, and then into the village. Can you picture this in your mind?

26 Chapter 1 BUT… the village doesn’t matter to the story. What IS important to the story?  The jailhouse  The gallows  The first house with the iron fence  The road  The woods Turn and talk with a partner. What predictions can you make about WHY those places and things might be important in the story?

27 The Woods There was no road through the woods because the cows had made a path around the woods. Also, the woods belonged to the Fosters, who owned the first house in the village, so the woods were private property. Winnie Foster, the only child in the Foster family, never went into the woods. She never had any interest in going there.

28 “There was something strange about the wood. If the look of the first house suggested that you’d better pass it by, so did the look of the wood, but for quite a different reason…. the wood had a sleeping, otherworld appearance that made you want to speak in whispers. This, at least, is what the cows must have thought: ‘Let it keep its peace: we won’t disturb it.’”

29 If they had made their road through the wood …the people would have noticed the giant ash tree at the center of the wood, and then, in time, they’d have noticed the little spring bubbling up among its roots in spite of the pebbles piled there to conceal it. And that would have been a disaster so immense that this weary old earth, owned or not to its fiery core, would have trembled on its axis like a beetle on a pin.

30 Read Chapter 1 What types of connections do you see between the ideas we’ve discussed and the ideas in this chapter?

31

32 Chapter 1 – Otherwise known as…?

33 PROLOGUE CHAPTERS 5-25 – Characters begin to come together and the “plot thickens.” EPILOGUE CHAPTER 1: Setting (sets up contrast between the Treegap woods and the town/people) CHAPTER 2: Introduces Mae and Angus Tuck CHAPTER 3: Introduces Winnie Foster CHAPTER 4: Introduces the stranger (the man in the yellow suit)

34 mel · an · chol · y (mel′ ·ə n · käl′ · ē) Chapter 2

35 melancholy (mel′ ·ə n · käl′ · ē) Part of speech: Adjective Definition: sad, gloomy Example: I felt melancholy when I had to leave my grandparents’ house after spending a fun Spring Break with them. Ask: What might make you feel melancholy?

36 brooch

37 shawl

38 petticoat

39 music box &sz=22&tbnid=h3N6_xr0rpBI6M:&tbnh=122&tbnw=109&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dphoto%2Bof%2Bmusic%2Bbox&zoom=1&q=photo+of+music+box&usg=__BSINAadcP1MtUe5qMEKh4Wj EmNs=&sa=X&ei=VrEPTdW6LIGC8gbtjaXmAQ&ved=0CCgQ9QEwAg As you read the novel, pay attention to how Mae’s music box is important to the plot.

40 Chapter 2 Read to see what you can learn about Mae and Angus Tuck.

41 Can you picture Mae? “… a great potato of a woman with a round, sensible face and calm brown eyes.” “… three petticoats, a rusty brown skirt with one enormous pocket, an old cotton jacket, and a knitted shawl which she pinned across her bosom with a tarnished metal brooch.” “…pulled on a pair of short leather boots so thin and soft with age it was a wonder they held together.” “…she pulled down over her ears a blue straw hat with a drooping, exhausted brim.” “…she brushed her gray-brown hair and wound it into a bun at the back of her neck.”

42 Find text evidence that supports the following inferences: #1 Partners: Mae’s hopes: Mae is hoping to see her two sons. #2 Partners: Tuck’s fears: Tuck is concerned that Mae might be seen by other people. GENERATE/SHARE

43 Text Evidence Mae is hoping to see her two sons. At last she said aloud, “The boys’ll be home tomorrow!” “Our sons. I’m going to ride down to meet them.” Tuck is concerned that Mae might be seen by other people. “Better not do that,” said Tuck. “I know,” said Mae, “but I just can’t wait to see them. Anyways, it’s ten years since I went to Treegap. No one’ll remember me. I’ll ride in at sunset, just to the wood. I won’t go into the village. But even if someone did see me, they won’t remember.” Mae’s trades (see above) Mae is willing to be seen/risk her safety in order to see her sons, so I can infer that her sons are important to her and she has missed them. GENERATE/SHARE

44 Major Characters Tuck Family Angus (father) Mae (mother) Miles (older brother) Jesse (younger brother)

45 Chapter 2 – Otherwise known as…?

46 PROLOGUE CHAPTERS 5-25 – Characters begin to come together and the “plot thickens.” EPILOGUE CHAPTER 1: Setting (sets up contrast between the Treegap woods and the town/people) CHAPTER 2: Introduces Mae and Angus Tuck CHAPTER 3: Introduces Winnie Foster CHAPTER 4: Introduces the stranger (the man in the yellow suit)

47 cross (krôs) Chapter 3

48 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: angry, upset Example: Juan was cross because his mother made him clean his room instead of going to the movies with his friends. Ask: What makes you feel cross? Other meanings: cross (krôs)

49 grimace (grim′ · is)

50 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to twist face in ugly way because you’re disgusted, annoyed, or in pain Example: Keyeana grimaced at the thought of having to wake up at 6:00 in the morning. Ask: What movie or TV characters can you think of who grimace a lot? Related words: grimace (noun) grim (adj.) grimace (grim′ · is)

51 resentful (rĭ · zĕnt · f ə l)

52 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: full of bitterness and anger Example: At first I felt very resentful about losing my spot on the soccer team. Ask: How is feeling resentful different from just feeling upset? Related word: resent (verb) resentful (rĭ · zĕnt · f ə l)

53 peer (p ē r)

54 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to look at Example: Isaiah peered into the window of the restaurant to see how crowded it was. Ask: If you could peer into a crystal ball and see your future, what would you hope to see? Other meaning: peer (p ē r)

55 anxious (aŋk′ · sh ə s)

56 Part of speech: Adverb Definition: nervous Example: Standing outside while it was lightning made me anxious. Ask: What makes you anxious? anxious (aŋk′ · sh ə s) Other meaning:

57 exasperated (eg · zas′ · p ə r · ā · tid)

58 Part of speech: Adverb Definition: very frustrated or angry Example: I was exasperated by the fact that my little brother kept repeating everything that I said. Ask: What is an antonym for exasperated? Related word: exasperation exasperated (eg · zas′ · p ə r · ā · tid)

59 Chapter 3 Some cultures consider toads to be a symbol of long life. As you read, think about whether the toad in this novel could symbolize long life.

60 Metamorphosis Toads undergo metamorphosis. Have you ever had an experience that caused you to change, for better or for worse? As you read the novel, think about how Winnie undergoes a metamorphosis (change) of her own.

61 Chapter 3 Read to see what you can infer about Winnie. What are her hopes? What are her fears? What is her life like? What trades has she made/ would she like to make in her life? What is her personality?

62 Inferences about Winnie – Chapter 3 Think/Pair/Share Inferences Text Clues She doesn’t have any/many friends. She needs someone to talk to who won’t judge her/tell her how to act. She is so frustrated that she is willing to talk to anyone/anything that will listen.

63 InferencesText Clues She doesn’t have any/many friends. She needs someone to talk to who won’t judge her/tell her how to act. She is so frustrated that she is willing to talk to anyone/anything that will listen. Winnie is talking to a toad. p. 11 “Look here, toad…. I don’t think I can stand it much longer.” p. 12 “See? …. It’s like that every minute…. I’m tired of being looked at all the time.” Inferences about Winnie – Chapter 3

64 InferencesText Clues #1 Partners: Winnie wants to do something important with her life, but she feels like she can’t because of her family/her situation. #2 Partners: Winnie is an only child, but she wishes she had a brother or sister to divert her parents’ attention away from her. #3 Partners: Winnie has been taught to be respectful of her parents. Now you and your partner try it on your own!

65 Inferences about Winnie – Chapter 3 Inferences Text Clues Winnie wants to do something important with her life, but she feels like she can’t because of her family/her situation. p. 12 “I’ll never be able to do anything important if I stay in here like this.” p. 12 “It’d be better if I could be like you, out in the open and making up my own mind. Do you know they’ve hardly ever let me out of this yard by myself?”

66 Inferences about Winnie – Chapter 3 InferencesText Clues Winnie is an only child, but she wishes she had a brother or sister to divert her parents’ attention away from her. p. 12 “If I had a sister or a brother, there’d be someone else to watch.”

67 Inferences about Winnie – Chapter 3 Inference Text Clues Winnie has been taught to be respectful of her parents. p. 13 “‛All right! I’m coming!’” she cried, exasperated, and then she added quickly, “‛I mean, I’ll be right there, Mama.’”

68 Hyperbole p. 12 “See? …. It’s like that every minute…. I’m tired of being looked at all the time.” How can you tell Winnie’s statements are examples of hyperbole? What does this use of hyperbole help the reader understand about Winnie? Hyperbole is a figure of speech that uses exaggeration to express strong emotion, make a point, or evoke humor. Example: “You’ve asked me a million times.”

69 “It’d be better if I could be like you, out in the open and making up my own mind. Do you know they’ve hardly ever let me out of this yard all by myself?” What “iron fences” do you feel like you have in your life (strict parents, responsibilities to younger siblings, restrictions due to lack of money, etc.)? How do you feel about them/how do you deal with them? How would your life be different without them?

70 Major Characters Tuck Family Angus (father) Mae (mother) Miles (older brother) Jesse (younger brother) Winnie Foster

71 Chapter 3 – Otherwise known as…?

72 PROLOGUE CHAPTERS 5-25 – Characters begin to come together and the “plot thickens.” EPILOGUE CHAPTER 1: Setting (sets up contrast between the Treegap woods and the town/people) CHAPTER 2: Introduces Mae and Angus Tuck CHAPTER 3: Introduces Winnie Foster CHAPTER 4: Introduces the stranger (the man in the yellow suit)

73 gesture (jes′ · ch ə r) Chapter 4

74 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to make a movement to express emotion or information Example: The teacher gestured toward the desk at the front of the room to indicate that Juliana should sit there. Ask: How could you gesture to show that you like or approve of something? gesture (jes′ · ch ə r) Related word: gesture (noun)

75 eager (ē′ · g ə r)

76 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: you want to do or have something very much; you expect something interesting or enjoyable to happen Example: Eduardo was eager to try to get to the next level in his video game. Ask: What is something that you are eager to do? Related word: eagerly (adverb) eager (ē′ · g ə r)

77 Chapter 4 The author never gives “the man in the yellow suit” a name. As you read the novel, try to figure out why the author made that choice and what effect it has on the story. As you read this chapter, see what inferences you can make about the man in the yellow suit.  What are his hopes?  What is his personality?

78 Can you picture the man in the yellow suit? (Chapter 4) remarkably tall and narrow long chin faded off into a thin, apologetic beard suit was a jaunty yellow that seemed to glow a black hat dangled from one hand dry, gray hair long, thin fingers his tall body moved continuously…in angles, rather jerkily he had a kind of grace, like a marionette marionette

79 Major Characters Tuck Family Angus (father) Mae (mother) Miles (older brother) Jesse (younger brother) Winnie Foster Man in Yellow Suit

80 Setting WOODS TUCKS’ PLACE

81 Chapter 4 – Otherwise known as…?

82 Third Person Omniscient Point of View The author is able to tell about the different characters and the separate events in Chapters 2 – 4 because the story is told from the third person omniscient point of view. The story is told in third-person (he, she, they – not I, we). The author has an all-knowing perspective. Third-person point of view allows the author to be like a movie camera moving to any set and recording any event, as long as one of the characters is lugging the camera. It also allows the camera to “slide behind the eyes” of any character. I can see Winnie. I can see the Tuck family. I can see the man in the yellow suit.

83 Third Person Limited Omniscient Point of View If Tuck Everlasting were written in the third person limited omniscient point of view, the narrator’s knowledge would be restricted to one character’s view or behavior. The story would unfold entirely in the main character's presence. The reader would be privy to the main character's thoughts - and only the main character's thoughts. The writer would not include any scenes where the main character was not present and would not include any information that the main character did not know.

84 Third Person Omniscient Point of View Pay attention to how the author uses the third person omniscient point of view to develop the story. Think about it as you read: How would the story be different if the author only told about events that occurred in Winnie’s presence?

85 Quiz Time! (Prologue – Chapter 4)

86 PROLOGUE CHAPTERS 5-25 – Characters begin to come together and the “plot thickens.” EPILOGUE CHAPTER 1: Setting (sets up contrast between the Treegap woods and the town/people) CHAPTER 2: Introduces Mae and Angus Tuck CHAPTER 3: Introduces Winnie Foster CHAPTER 4: Introduces the stranger (the man in the yellow suit)

87 disheartened (dis · härt′ ·i nd) Chapter 5

88 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: disappointed, not hopeful Example: Daisy was disheartened by her team’s loss during the playoffs. Ask: What is the difference between feeling disheartened and feeling melancholy? What is similar about the two feelings? Related word: disheartening (adjective) disheartened (dis · härt′ ·i nd)

89 timid (tim′ · id)

90 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: shy, nervous, not confident Example: The timid girl stepped forward shyly and shook the stranger’s hand. Ask: What types of situations make you feel timid? Related words: timidly (adverb) timidity (noun) timid (tim′ · id)

91 protest (prō · test′)

92 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to object, argue against Example: When Camryn’s mother told her that they would be moving out-of- state at the end of the year, Camryn protested because she didn’t want to leave her friends in Texas. Ask: What are some different ways that people protest? Related word: protest (noun) protest (prō · test′)

93 reluctant (rĭ · lŭk · t ə nt)

94 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: unwilling; don’t want to; hesitating before doing something; doing something without enthusiasm Example: Michael was reluctant to ask for help because he was afraid the others would make fun of him. Ask: Would you be reluctant to sky dive? To scuba dive? Related words: reluctantly (adverb) reluctance (noun) reluctant (rĭ · lŭk · t ə nt)

95 solemn (säl′ ·ə m)

96 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: serious Example: The people at the ceremony that honored war veterans were solemn as they thought about the veterans’ sacrifices for their country. Ask: What are some other situations that would cause people to feel solemn? Related words: solemnly (adverb) solemnity (noun) solemn (säl′ ·ə m)

97 persist (p ə r · sist′)

98 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to keep on doing something, even if it’s difficult Example: The detective persisted in trying to solve the case, even though the crime happened several years ago. Ask: Who do you know or know about that has persisted in doing something? Related words: persistent (adjective ) – often used as a synonym for “determined” persistently (adverb) persist (p ə r · sist′)

99 Chapter 5 “I knew this would happen sooner or later. Now what am I going to do?” “Well, boys,… here it is. The worst is happening at last.” Read to find out who said this and why.

100 Chapter 5 Quiz What is the main conflict between Jesse and Winnie?

101

102 Chapter 5 – Otherwise known as…?

103 plead (plēd) Chapter 6

104 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to beg Example: Ariel pleaded with her parents to be allowed to go to the dance. Ask: What types of things have you pleaded for ? Other meanings: officially state that you are guilty or not guilty of committing a crime (e.g., “plead guilty”) speak in support of someone or something (e.g., “plead your case”) to give an excuse for something (e.g., “plead ignorance”) plead (plēd)

105 dismay (dis · mā′)

106 Part of speech: Noun Definition: a strong feeling of worry, sadness, or fear, caused by something unexpected or unpleasant Example: The babysitter watched with dismay as the misbehaving children ran around crazily and tore up the house. Ask: What is the difference between “dismay” and “sadness”? Related word: to be dismayed (verb) dismay (dis · mā′)

107 implore (im · plôr′)

108 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to beg Example: Luke implored his older brother to take him for a ride in his new car. Ask: What other vocabulary word have you learned that means “to beg”? implore (im · plôr′)

109 Chapter 6 “ ‘Please, child... dear, dear child... don’t you be scared.’ This was Mae, trying to run and call back over her shoulder at the same time. ‘We... wouldn’t harm you... for the world.’”

110 Chapter 6 Read to find out: Who witnesses Winnie’s kidnapping? How do you think this event will advance the plot? What makes Winnie calm down and quit crying?

111 Chapter 6 – Otherwise known as…?

112 peculiar (pi · kyo̅o̅l′ · y ə r) Chapters 7 & 8

113 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: strange, unusual Example: The exotic fruit that Rebecca ate while on vacation had a peculiar taste. Ask: Describe the actions of someone who might be acting in a peculiar manner. Related word: peculiarity (noun) peculiar (pi · kyo̅o̅l′ · y ə r)

114 scornful (skôrn′ · f ə l)

115 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: have no respect for; do not value or believe in something Example: Shayla was scornful of her friends who still watched cartoons. Ask: How might you show that you were scornful of someone or something? Related word: scorn (verb) scornful (skôrn′ · f ə l)

116 cautious (kô′ · sh ə s)

117 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: careful Example: The guide reminded the tourists to be cautious when they were hiking along the edge of the cliff. Ask: What is another situation in which you might need to be cautious? Related words: caution (noun or verb) cautiously (adverb) cautious (kô′ · sh ə s)

118 elated (ĭ · lā · tĭd)

119 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: extremely happy and excited Example: Marquis was elated when he found out that his mom had won the lottery. Ask: What would make you feel elated? Related word: elation (noun) elated (ĭ · lā · tĭd)

120 Chapters 7 & 8 Read to find out how Jesse and Miles each feel about their secret (similar or different?). Why is the Tucks’ cat an important part of their story?

121 What would be some advantages and some disadvantages to being the age that you are now… forever?

122

123

124 Chapters 7 & 8 How do the actions of the man in the yellow suit create suspense or tension in the plot?

125 “Closing the gate on her oldest fears as she had closed the gate of her own fenced yard, [Winnie] discovered the wings she’d always wished she had. And all at once she was elated. Where were the terrors she’d been told she should expect? She could not recognize them anywhere.” What can you infer about Winnie’s hopes and fears now? What “trades” has she made so far in the book?

126 Chapters 7 & 8 – Otherwise known as…?

127 Quiz Time! Chapters 5 - 8


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