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World Civ. Chapter 7.2 Notes Continued & Chapter 7.3 Notes.

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Presentation on theme: "World Civ. Chapter 7.2 Notes Continued & Chapter 7.3 Notes."— Presentation transcript:

1 World Civ. Chapter 7.2 Notes Continued & Chapter 7.3 Notes

2 Introduction Bell Work Bell Work Identify 5 effects of the Factory System. Identify 5 effects of the Factory System. Flash Back Flash Back What is the geographic region between 23.5 o N latitude and 23.5 o S latitude called? What is the geographic region between 23.5 o N latitude and 23.5 o S latitude called?

3 Introduction 5 effects of the Factory System 5 effects of the Factory System Goods produced in factories Goods produced in factories Work required few easily learned skills Work required few easily learned skills Children employed in large numbers Children employed in large numbers Workers dealt with managers & factory owners Workers dealt with managers & factory owners More people joined the middle class More people joined the middle class Flash Back Flash Back The Tropics The Tropics

4 Workers in a New Economy The Factory System required large amounts of capital to pay for building the factories & installing machinery. The Factory System required large amounts of capital to pay for building the factories & installing machinery. This gave rise to 3 levels of participation: This gave rise to 3 levels of participation: Wealthy people to invest in & own the factories Wealthy people to invest in & own the factories Mid-level employees to run/supervise operations Mid-level employees to run/supervise operations Low-level employees to run the machines Low-level employees to run the machines

5 Workers in a New Economy Wealthy Investors – expected to make a profit & shared little of their profits with employees. Wealthy Investors – expected to make a profit & shared little of their profits with employees. Factory workers had little incentive to improve job performance. Factory workers had little incentive to improve job performance. Workers were plentiful – Workers were plentiful – Farm workers displaced by the enclosure movement Farm workers displaced by the enclosure movement Immigrants Immigrants “Women’s Work” – unskilled factory jobs; took orders “better” than men “Women’s Work” – unskilled factory jobs; took orders “better” than men

6 The Cotton Gin A Segment of: Greatest Inventions with Bill Nye: Math, Business, and Industry

7 Cottage Workers’ Unrest Not all cottage workers went to the factory for work. Not all cottage workers went to the factory for work. Hand-made items were more expensive than factory-made items & thus were harder to sell. Hand-made items were more expensive than factory-made items & thus were harder to sell. This created bad feelings of cottage workers towards factories This created bad feelings of cottage workers towards factories

8 Cottage Workers’ Unrest Luddite Movement: Luddite Movement: Luddites – named after General Ned Ludd (who may have been a fictitious character) Luddites – named after General Ned Ludd (who may have been a fictitious character) Opposed machines “hurtful to the commonality” Opposed machines “hurtful to the commonality” 1811 Masked workers attacked a textile factory in Nottingham, England Masked workers attacked a textile factory in Nottingham, England. Burned factories & smashed machinery Burned factories & smashed machinery 1812 the movement spread to other cities 1812 the movement spread to other cities Several Luddites caught & hanged thus ending the movement Several Luddites caught & hanged thus ending the movement

9 Changing Labor Conditions British government refused to get involved British government refused to get involved British workers began to unionize British workers began to unionize Labor Unions – organizations representing workers’ interests Labor Unions – organizations representing workers’ interests Unions organized strikes (work stoppages) to get factory owners to raise wages and improve working conditions. Unions organized strikes (work stoppages) to get factory owners to raise wages and improve working conditions.

10 Changing Labor Conditions At first Parliament banned strikes At first Parliament banned strikes Public pressure convinced Parliament to get involved Public pressure convinced Parliament to get involved 1832 Sadler Report – described abuses in factories 1832 Sadler Report – described abuses in factories Laws were passes that limited work hours for adults and children; also children had to be at least 9 years old to work in a factory. Laws were passes that limited work hours for adults and children; also children had to be at least 9 years old to work in a factory parliament legalized labor unions parliament legalized labor unions.

11 A New Class of Workers Emergence of the Middle Class who were somewhat richer than the poor factory workers but poorer than the rich factory owners. Emergence of the Middle Class who were somewhat richer than the poor factory workers but poorer than the rich factory owners. Managers & Accountants kept factories running & books balanced Managers & Accountants kept factories running & books balanced Engineers designed machines Engineers designed machines Mechanics kept machines in good repair Mechanics kept machines in good repair Deliverers transported goods to market Deliverers transported goods to market

12 Interchangeable Parts The Invention of Interchangeable Parts, 1798 A Segment of: America's Early Years:America's Early Years: America in a Changing World

13 The Process of Mass Production Mass Production – the system of manufacturing large numbers of identical items. Mass Production – the system of manufacturing large numbers of identical items. Interchangeable Parts Interchangeable Parts The Assembly Line The Assembly Line

14 The Process of Mass Production Interchangeable Parts – identical machine-made parts Interchangeable Parts – identical machine-made parts Made production & repair more efficient Made production & repair more efficient Assembly Line – a mass-production process in which a product is moved forward through many work stations, where workers perform specific tasks. Assembly Line – a mass-production process in which a product is moved forward through many work stations, where workers perform specific tasks. Before this it was the product that was stationary and the workers who moved. Before this it was the product that was stationary and the workers who moved. Ransom E. Olds – developer of the assembly line Ransom E. Olds – developer of the assembly line Henry Ford – perfected it with a conveyor belt. Henry Ford – perfected it with a conveyor belt.

15 The Assembly Line Assembly Line A Segment of: Greatest Inventions with Bill Nye:Greatest Inventions with Bill Nye: Math, Business, and Industry Notice the relationship of workers to the products… which is moving & which is stationary?

16 Effects of Mass Production Advantages Dramatic increase in production Dramatic increase in production Decrease in prices Decrease in prices More people could afford mass-produced goods More people could afford mass-produced goodsDisadvantages More repetitious jobs for employees More repetitious jobs for employees Worker protest Worker protest

17 Biographies Packet “The First Modern Railroad” (pg ) “The First Modern Railroad” (pg ) “Machines Transform the English Textile Industry” (pg ) “Machines Transform the English Textile Industry” (pg ) “Historical Map of English Factories” (pg. 16) “Historical Map of English Factories” (pg. 16)

18 Andrew Carnegie “Andrew Carnegie: The Original Man of Steel”


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