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Chapter 28, Section World Geography Chapter 28 Regional Atlas: Introduction to South Asia Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 28, Section World Geography Chapter 28 Regional Atlas: Introduction to South Asia Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 28, Section World Geography Chapter 28 Regional Atlas: Introduction to South Asia Copyright © 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved.

2 Chapter 28, Section South Asia

3 Chapter 28, Section The Indus Valley civilization flourished from about 2500 to 1500 B.C., toward the end of which came several waves of invaders. Historical Overview The region is home to two major world religions, Hinduism and Buddhism, and over several centuries a series of invaders founded and conquered empires in South Asia. Muslim invaders founded the Sultanate of Delhi, and later the Mughal Empire. Over time, European companies set up trading posts along the coast, but eventually the English East India Company edged out rivals and built a colonial empire across South Asia. Resistance to British rule eventually led to the independence and partition of India and Pakistan, and India became one of the nonaligned nations, which adopted neutrality during the Cold War. 1

4 Chapter 28, Section 5 People and Cultures

5 Chapter 28, Section Cattle are commonplace sights in South Asia, and in Hinduism, cows are sacred and are not used for food

6 Chapter 28, Section South Asia is one of the most densely populated areas on earth. 5 People and Cultures India has a population growth rate of 1.6 percent, which will lead to the doubling of the nation’s population in 36 years.

7 Chapter 28, Section Urban landscapes are a mixture of old and new building styles.

8 Chapter 28, Section 6 Economies, Technology, and Environment

9 Chapter 28, Section Agriculture dominates South Asia’s economy, but many people are leaving rural areas to live and work in cities. 6 Economies, Technology, and Environment Subsistence farming is practiced through much of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Nomadic herding is important in most of Afghanistan and parts of Pakistan and India. Manufacturing and trade are practiced in large urban areas in India and Pakistan.

10 Chapter 28, Section Database India’s future economic growth is tied to telecommunications, but despite the large number of daily newspapers, many Indians are too poor to afford subscriptions and thus have limited access to information. Population: 1,095,351,995 (July 2006 est.) Covering 1,269,338 square miles India is roughly one- third the size of the United States. India has the second largest population in the world and is one of the world's most ethnically diverse countries. The nation is home to several hundred languages, of which 33 have 100,000 or more speakers. India is the birthplace of Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, and Sikhism. 7

11 Chapter 28, Section Road to Independence Keep in mind these questions: What role did Mohandas Gandhi play in India’s move from a British colony to an independent nation? How did religious conflict contribute to independence for Pakistan and Bangladesh? 1

12 Chapter 28, Section Indian Independence The British undercut the successful Indian textile industry because they wanted to use India as a market for cheaper, machine-made textiles produced in Britain. British officials held positions of power in the government and the army, while Indians were expected to take positions at the lower levels. As Indian nationalism began to develop in the late 1800s, Western ideas of individual rights and self- government spread through the Indian middle class. 1

13 Chapter 28, Section Indian Independence Mohandas Gandhi, a young law student who had traveled to England to study, used nonviolent resistance as a weapon against British injustice and won the hearts of many Indians. Gandhi peacefully resisted by boycotting, or refusing to purchase, British cloth and wearing clothes made from yarn he spun himself. As sales of British cloth fell sharply due to the spread of the boycott, Gandhi’s program of nonviolent resistance developed into a mass movement, and Gandhi attracted support from other countries. In 1935, the British gave in to mounting Indian and international pressures and agreed to establish provinces governed entirely by Indians. 1

14 Chapter 28, Section The deepening conflict between Hindus and Muslims, made worse by economic differences, led to the partition, or division, of the subcontinent into Hindu India and Muslim Pakistan. Religious Conflict Violent Partition Independence came to India and Pakistan in million people moved to avoid the rule of a majority religion to which they did not belong. Many refugees died from hunger and thirst, and an estimated one million people were killed in fighting between Muslims and Hindus. Since independence, India and Pakistan have fought three wars. Bangladesh Islam was the only thread that connected East and West Pakistan. East Pakistan had a less developed economy and paid more taxes than West Pakistan, where most tax dollars were spent. After a devastating cyclone in 1970, grievances led to fighting, and India joined the conflict on the side of the East Pakistanis. As a result, in 1971, East Pakistan became the independent country of Bangladesh. 1

15 Chapter 28, Section

16 Section 1 Review What is one British product Gandhi boycotted? a)tea b)cloth c)machine tools d)ceramics What solution did British and Indian leaders agree would solve conflict? a)There would be a power-sharing agreement between Hindus and Christians. b)Pakistan and Bangladesh would be created as Muslim homelands. c)The Hindus would be given complete control over the subcontinent. d)The subcontinent would be partitioned into India and Pakistan. Want to connect to the World Geography link for this section? Click Here!Click Here! 1

17 Chapter 28, Section Section 1 Review What is one British product Gandhi boycotted? a)tea b)cloth c)machine tools d)ceramics What solution did British and Indian leaders agree would solve conflict? a)There would be a power-sharing agreement between Hindus and Christians. b)Pakistan and Bangladesh would be created as Muslim homelands. c)The Hindus would be given complete control over the subcontinent. d)The subcontinent would be partitioned into India and Pakistan. Want to connect to the World Geography link for this section? Click Here!Click Here! 1

18 Chapter 28, Section India’s People and Economy Keep these questions in mind as you learn: How does religion shape the lives of most people in India? In what ways has village life in India remained essentially the same for generations, and in what ways has it changed in recent years? How has urbanization changed the character of India? In what ways is India’s government attempting to raise the country’s standard of living? 2

19 Chapter 28, Section 2 Religious Life The majority of people practice Hinduism. Hindus believe in reincarnation. Hindu society has been organized according to the caste system, a social hierarchy in which people are born into a group that has a distinct rank in society. At the top of the caste system are Brahmans, followed by Kshatriyas, Vaisyas, Sudras, and “untouchables”, or outcasts. Untouchables still have fewer educational and economic opportunities. Other religions practiced in India include Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, and Jainism.

20 Chapter 28, Section Daily Life About 7 out of 10 Indians live in villages and farm for a living. Houses belonging to more prosperous families in a village are made of better materials than those of poorer villagers, most of which include only a charpoy, or wooden bed frame with knotted string in place of a mattress. For religious and economic reasons, Indians follow a mostly vegetarian diet, and most Indians eat some form of rice every day. 2

21 Chapter 28, Section Because most of India is hot and humid, clothing is light and loose. Many Indian women wear a sari, and some women follow the custom of purdah, whereby they cover their faces with veils while in public.

22 Chapter 28, Section Families in India are generally large, and many members of an extended family live in a single household in what is known as the joint family system. Because illiteracy is widespread, television, radio, and movies are more powerful media than newspapers for spreading new ideas to Indian villagers.

23 Chapter 28, Section Urbanization Many of India’s people live in small or medium-sized towns, which are larger and livelier than rural villages. India’s cities are very densely populated, as evidenced by Mumbai’s population density of 714,000 inhabitants per square mile. Despite the extreme crowding and poverty, cities offer more opportunities for work and education than do rural areas. 2

24 Chapter 28, Section Mumbai, on India’s west coast, is the country’s busiest port and its financial center, while Chennai and Kolkata are major centers of commerce and shipping on the east coast. New Delhi is the country’s capital and center of government. Varanasi, on the banks of the Ganges, is regarded by Hindus as their holiest city, and devout Hindus hope to visit the city at least once within their lifetime to wash in the sacred Ganges River.

25 Chapter 28, Section 2 Economic Improvements Farming methods have improved, but few families own enough land to support themselves. Many farmers have set up cottage industries to add to their income. India is a leading industrial nation, and advances have been made there in technology and consumer industries. The growing middle class forms the market for consumer goods.

26 Chapter 28, Section The literacy rate has increased, but many children do not complete their schooling because their families need them for other work. Improvements in health care have increased life expectancies, but many cannot afford even basic care.

27 Chapter 28, Section Section 2 Review How does the caste system affect the untouchables today? a)Many take advantage of increased opportunities. b)They are confined to one menial occupation. c)They are free of all caste-based restrictions. d)They still have fewer opportunities in education and employment. Why do many farmers set up cottage industries? a)They can increase their income. b)Many have lost their land to large businesses. c)They are diversifying their incomes in case of disaster. d)They have been ordered to do so by the government. Want to connect to the World Geography link for this section? Click Here!Click Here! 2

28 Chapter 28, Section Famous sites in India: The Taj Mahal


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