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Idaho SWPBIS Training Institute. Provide a logic for considering Schoolwide Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports Define the core features of SWPBIS.

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Presentation on theme: "Idaho SWPBIS Training Institute. Provide a logic for considering Schoolwide Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports Define the core features of SWPBIS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Idaho SWPBIS Training Institute

2 Provide a logic for considering Schoolwide Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports Define the core features of SWPBIS Define the implementation approach Define the outcomes of SWPBIS

3 Supporting social behavior is central to achieving academic gains Schoolwide PBIS is an evidence-based practice for building a positive social culture that will promote both social and academic success Implementation of any evidence-based practice requires a more coordinated focus than typically expected

4 1.Never stop doing what is working 2.Always look for the smallest change that will produce the largest effect Avoid defining a large number of goals Do a small number of things well 3.Do not add something new without also defining what you will stop doing to make the addition possible 4.Collect and use data for decision-making 5.Adapt any initiative to make it “fit” your school, community, culture, and context 6.Establish policy clarity before investing in implementation

5 Doing more with less Educating a greater number of students who are increasingly more different from each other Educating students with severe problem behaviors Creating sustainable cultures of competence

6 1.Structure, predictability, and consistency 2.Immediate, frequent, and specific feedback with consequences 3.Academic success 4.Responsibility and independence 5.Positive problem solving 6.Positive alternatives 7.Enhanced self- confidence 8.Positive school-to- home support systems 9.Documented positive change Hierck, Coleman, & Weber, 2011

7 Home Community School

8 Home: 1.Inconsistent management 2.Reactive discipline 3.Lack of monitoring

9 Community: 1.Antisocial network of peers 2.Lack of positive social engagements

10 School: 1.Reactive/punishing discipline approach 2.Lack of agreement about rules, expectations, and consequences 3.Lack of staff support 4.Failure to consider and accommodate individual differences 5.Academic failure

11 School environment is predictable Common language Common vision (understanding of expectations) Common experience (everyone knows) School environment is positive Regular recognition for positive behavior School environment is safe Violent and disruptive behavior is not tolerated School environment is consistent Adults use similar expectations

12 1.Establish PBIS leadership team 2.Secure schoolwide agreements and supports 3.Establish data-based action plan 4.Conduct formative data-based monitoring

13 One of the keys to maintaining common expectations is to have a system in place that is sustainable, regardless of the players in that system. Hierk, Coleman, Weber, p. 25, 2011

14 GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Agreements Team Data-based Action Plan ImplementationEvaluation

15 Behavioral capacity School, student, family, and district representation Active administrator participation Efficient communications and staff development Leadership and decision-making status Data-based decision-making and problem- solving

16 Complete: PBIS Team Implementation Checklist (TIC 3.1)

17 Supports Administrative leadership Prioritized resources Materials, personnel On-going coaching Time Agreements Prioritized data-based need and action 3-4 year commitment Proactive instructional approach

18 Use of available and meaningful data – Self-assessment survey – Behavioral incident data, attendance – Academic achievement Consideration of multiple systems Adoption, adaptation, and sustained use of evidence-based practices

19 Implementation of SWPBIS: Benchmark of Quality (BOQ), Self-assessment Student problem behavior: office discipline referrals, suspensions, expulsions Student Academic Achievement: state standardized test scores Fidelity of SWPBIS: Team Implementation Checklist (TIC), Coaches Checklist, SET 2.1

20 Build a Culture of Competence Define behavior expectations Teach behavior expectations Monitor and reward appropriate behavior Provide corrective consequences for behavioral errors Information-based problem solving Do not expect schoolwide efforts to effect students with chronic problem behavior

21 Identify 3-5 expectations Short statements Positive statements (what to do, NOT what to avoid doing) Memorable Examples: Be Respectful, Be Responsible, Be Safe, Be Kind, Be a Friend, Be-there-be-ready, Hands and feet to self, Respect Self, others, property, Do Your Best, Follow Directions of Adults

22 1.Define three to five core behavioral expectations you would recommend for your school.  Core value  Positive & short  Memorable 2.How would you include families, students, and community members in the process? 3.How would you assess if the teaching has been effective?

23 Transform broad schoolwide expectations into specific, observable behaviors Use the Expectations by Settings Matrix Teach in the actual settings where behaviors are to occur Teach: the words & the actions Build a social culture that is predictable, and focused on student success

24 1.Teach social skills like academic skills. Model behaviors, structure situations in which students can practice behaviors, and provide corrective feedback. 2.Integrate social and academic skills within and across the curriculum. When reviewing instructions for an academic task, reinforce the behaviors necessary for students to respectfully and collaboratively complete the task. 3.Respond proactively to infrequent errors. Recognize students for behaving well and try to anticipate when students may be at risk of misbehaving.

25 4.Precorrect for chronic errors and with those students likely to exhibit problem behaviors. Understand the antecedents that precede misbehaviors and have plans in place to prevent them. 5.Teach, encourage, and reinforce positive expectations. Classrooms are communities built on relationships. Positive communities of learners built on positive relationships make goals for positive behavior easier to achieve. 6.Use numerous strategies and alternatives as errors become more chronic. Work collaboratively with experts within and outside the school to develop a set of supports for students who are at risk for chronic behavior problems.

26 7.Maximize academic success to increase social behavior success. Research acknowledges that the top contributor to problem behavior at school is academic failure. When diagnosing academic difficulties, consider behavioral causes; when diagnosing behavioral difficulties, consider academic causes. 8.Actively supervise students. Adults should be present where many students congregate (such as in the schoolyard or in the halls) to supervise behavior and model positive behavior.

27 9.Have a high ratio of positive to negative interactions. Actively reinforce and recognize when students meet expectations at four times the rate that students are corrected for misbehaviors. 10.Provide specific, formative feedback that “informs learners about what they have done well and what they need to do differently.” Develop a process through which students receive frequent, immediate feedback, particularly when they prove to be at risk for behavior problems. Hierck, Coleman, & Weber, 2011

28 Location 1Location 2Location 3Location 4Location 5Location 6 Expectation 1 Expectation 2 Expectation 3 Expectation 4 Expectation 5

29 Location 1 Lunch Location 2Location 3 Classroom Location 4Location 5Location 6 Expectation 1 Respect Sit with your class Listen when others speak Expectation 2 Responsible Clean up your area Be on task Expectation 3 Expectation 4 Expectation 5

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31 RAHClassroomHallway/ Commons CafeteriaBathrooms Respect Be on time; attend regularly; follow class rules Keep location neat, keep to the right, use appropriate lang., monitor noise level, allow others to pass Put trash in cans, push in your chair, be courteous to all staff and students Keep area clean, put trash in cans, be mindful of others’ personal space, flush toilet Achievement Do your best on all assignments and assessments, take notes, ask questions Keep track of your belongings, monitor time to get to class Check space before you leave, keep track of personal belongings Be a good example to other students, leave the room better than you found it Honor Do your own work; tell the truth Be considerate of yours and others’ personal space Keep your own place in line, maintain personal boundaries Report any graffiti or vandalism

32 ClassroomLunchroomBusHallwayAssembly Respect Others No food in class Eat your own food Stay in your seat No harassment No violence Arrive on time to speaker Respect Environment & Property Recycle paperReturn traysKeep feet on floorDo not litter Leave the auditorium as clean as you find it. Respect Yourself Do your bestWash your hands Be at stop on time Use your words No hats No gum Respect Learning Have materials ready Eat balanced diet Go directly from bus to class Go directly to class Discuss topics in class w/ others

33 ClassroomLunchroomBusHallwayAssembly Respect Others No food in class Eat your own food Stay in your seat No harassment No violence Arrive on time to speaker Respect Environment & Property Recycle paperReturn traysKeep feet on floorDo not litter Leave the auditorium as clean as you find it. Respect Yourself Do your bestWash your hands Be at stop on time Use your words No hats No gum Respect Learning Have materials ready Eat balanced diet Go directly from bus to class Go directly to class Discuss topics in class w/ others

34 1.Define your schoolwide expectations 2.Define a set of possible locations 3.Select 1 location: Define the best example of behaving appropriately Identify the most common behavioral error in that location, and identify the positive alternative Write these two positive behaviors in each cell of the matrix

35 Teach behavior the same way you teach other subjects Define the concept to be learned (and label) – Provide rationale/logic Provide positive examples, and emphasize the key features of the positive examples Compare and Contrast positive examples with negative examples to build precision Practice positive performance with recognition

36 Nolan

37 As a team: 1.Use your team’s behavioral expectations as the standards of your school 2.Select a location in the school 3.Write a teaching plan that can be delivered to students in minutes

38 Do not ignore problem behavior (unless ignoring is part of a specific program) Define specific teacher responses for “minor” and “major” problem behavior Define the general “rule” for when a teacher should send a student to the office Do NOT expect office referrals to change behavior Use office referrals to (a) prevent problem behavior from being rewards, (b) prevent escalation, and (c) prevent problem behavior from interrupting on-going instruction Use teaching to change behavior See https://www.pbis.org/common/cms/files/newteam/data/referralformdefinitions.pdf for a list of behavioral definitions for problem behavior https://www.pbis.org/common/cms/files/newteam/data/referralformdefinitions.pdf

39 Record your personal score, then compare: On a scale of 1-10 (10=high) To what extent do teachers/staff in your school have a clear and consistent understanding of when to send a student to the office? To what extent do teachers/staff in your school use consistent definitions for types of problem behavior (e.g., harassment, disruption, dress code, violation, non-compliance)?

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42 Is the current discipline policy/process documented in the staff handbook? What are the teacher expectations? Do all staff members know what to do when they observe problem behavior? Is there consistency among staff? What is the purpose of our office referral form? Should our team consider revising the form? Do we get all of the information we need on the form? Have staff agreed on operational definitions of problem behavior? Do all staff members know how to complete the form? Who gets the form when it’s completed? What is the response from the administrator?

43 Data Entry & Analysis Can our school get access to the kind of information you need for decision making? Does the information get generated into a graph that is easy to read? Can I enter in referrals easily? (30 seconds/referral) Can I generate reports easily? (5 second rule) Do I have access to: – Number of referrals per day per month – Referrals by location – Referrals by time – Referrals by problem behavior – Referrals by student? What other reports may be helpful? How will data be shared?

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45 Every faculty/staff member acknowledges appropriate behavior – 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative contacts System that makes acknowledgement easy and simple for students and staff Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate behavior (small frequent rewards are more effective) – Beginning of class recognition – Raffles – Open gym – Social acknowledgement

46 Create work environments where employees: Know what is expected Have the materials and equipment to do the job correctly Receive recognition each week for good work Have a supervisor who cares, and pays attention Receive encouragement to contribute and improve Can identify a person at work who is a “best friend” Feel the mission of the organization makes them feel like their jobs are important See the people around them committed to doing a good job Feel like they are learning new things (getting better) Have the opportunity to do their job well Buckingham & Coffman, 2002

47 Create work environments where students: Know what is expected Have the materials and equipment to do the job correctly Receive recognition each week for good work Have a supervisor who cares, and pays attention Receive encouragement to contribute and improve Can identify a person at work who is a “best friend” Feel the mission of the organization makes them feel like their jobs are important See the people around them committed to doing a good job Feel like they are learning new things (getting better) Have the opportunity to do their job well Buckingham & Coffman, 2002

48 You are interested in student’s being respectful of each other. How will you build an acknowledgement system that promotes and encourages being respectful of others? How will students and teachers be acknowledged? What roadblocks and challenges would you predict with instituting an acknowledgement program? How will you overcome such challenges? How will you provide specific, direct, and frequent feedback implemented consistently? What strategies will we use to maintain 5:1 ratio?

49 SWPBIS Benefits Children Reduction of problem behavior – Office Discipline Referrals (ODR) – Suspensions – Expulsions – Improved effectiveness for intensive interventions Increased student engagement – Risk and protective factors improve – Students perceive school as a safer, more supportive environment Improved academic performance – When coupled with effective instruction Improved family involvement

50 SWPBIS Benefits Faculty and Staff Improved consistency across faculty – Better collaboration in support of individual students Improved classroom management – Classroom routines – Strategies for preventing and pre-empting problem behavior Reduced faculty absenteeism Increased faculty retention Improved substitute performance/perception Increased ratings of faculty “effectiveness” – Staff perceive themselves as more effective due to coherent planning, improved student behavior, effective strategies for addressing problems

51 SWPBIS Benefits District/Community Improved cost effectiveness – 1 ODR = 15 minutes of staff time; 45 minutes of student time Sustained effects across administrator, faculty, staff, student change – Cost of re-creating system draws away for effective education Administrative benefits of scale – Cost savings for data systems – Effective transitions among faculty when they shift from one school to another Effective innovation – Data systems promote innovation – Focus on research-based practices

52 1.How will you introduce information to your stakeholders about PBIS? 2.How will you involve faculty in the process? 3.What current data do you have that would help get buy-in? 4.Brainstorm approaches to get buy-in. 5.Develop a plan for buy-in.

53 Invest in prevention Build a social culture of competence Focus on different systems for different challenges Build local capacity through team processes, and adaption of the practices to fit the local context Use data for decision-making Begin with active administrative leadership

54 Complete the Schoolwide section of the Staff Survey. Summarize the results. Add items to Action Plan as needed. Be prepared to report on: 1-2 strengths. 1-2 areas of improvement. Next meeting (date and time).

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