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Emergency Operations Planning Drills. Exercises and Drills Assure predictable response in an actual emergency Identify problems/weaknesses in plans and.

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Operations Planning Drills. Exercises and Drills Assure predictable response in an actual emergency Identify problems/weaknesses in plans and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Operations Planning Drills

2 Exercises and Drills Assure predictable response in an actual emergency Identify problems/weaknesses in plans and procedures Staff and students practice and experience what is expected of them during an emergency

3 Exercises and Drills Just like other learning objectives in school, these must be taught and practiced! Evacuation Building Site Reverse evacuation Lock-down Shelter-in-place Drop and cover

4 Drill Lessons for students It is recommended that students be taught each type of emergency drill and the reasons and conditions that would activate the drill, in an age-appropriate manner. Lesson plans for teaching the drills are available on the Texas School Safety Center website for download and use by schools.

5 Drills Drills should be named and announced using plain language instead of code words in accordance with Incident Command Systems and NIMS NO MORE CODES! Drill should be taught to students before they are practiced including an explanation of why they are important

6 Why no more codes? BAILEY, COLO. 9/27/06 Foxnews.com Police: School gunman sexually assaulted girl hostages … SOPHOMORE ZACK BARNES, 16, SAID HIS FIRST INDICATION THAT THERE WAS SOMETHING WRONG AT HIS SCHOOL WAS AN ANNOUNCEMENT OVER THE PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM. "WE WERE SITTING THERE IN MATH CLASS AND OVER THE INTERCOM THEY SAID 'STUDENTS AND TEACHERS WE HAVE A CODE WHITE. REPEAT, CODE WHITE. 'AND NOBODY REALLY KNEW WHAT A CODE WHITE WAS,“ HE SAID HIS TEACHER CHECKED A SHEET OF PAPER FROM HER DESK AND THEN SAID THE CLASS HAD TO MOVE.

7 Emergency Procedures Exercised by Drills Fires and bomb threats Evacuation Tornadoes Drop and Cover Intruders Reverse Evacuation and Lock Down Hazardous Materials Release Reverse Evacuation and Shelter-in-place

8 Preparing for Emergency Drills Staff Provide staff members with written instructions on drilling procedures. Discuss the importance of emergency drills during staff meetings. Allow staff feedback on drill procedures. Assess the staff’s response to emergency drills. Include emergency drill procedures in information packets for substitutes and new staff members. Involve the school’s support staff in all emergency practice drills: librarians, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, frequent volunteers, etc.

9 Preparing for Emergency Drills Students Encourage staff to review the importance of emergency drills with students, as well as their role during drills. Provide students with specific instructions on each drill and include the objective of the drill. Allow student feedback concerning emergency drills. Provide emergency drill information to all new students. Include special provisions during drills for special needs students.

10 Student Movement: Lockdown Drills vs. Evacuation Drills Evacuation: Can students safely exit the building without moving toward the threat? School officials will need to quickly assess whether or not student evacuation can be accomplished safely. Lockdown: Can students remain safely in their current location without the threat moving toward them? School administrators have a duty to protect and ensure that students are not remaining in a threatening situation when their safe removal is possible.

11 Lockdown Drills Everyone reports to the assigned classroom, or lockdown location as quickly as possible. Teachers should quickly check the hallway to locate any students in the hallway before locking the door. Window blinds or drapes should be closed or paper can be used to cover windows. Once door is locked, the door should not be opened for knocks or other reasons. The door or window should only be opened by the prearranged “all clear” signal.

12 Evacuation Drills Students and staff members should be familiar with exit routes; diagrams of these should be posted in rooms. Primary and alternative routes should be selected. Make sure each room and other areas of the building have easy- to-find posters displayed near doorways of each classroom. Students, faculty, and others in the building should evacuate the building immediately upon hearing the fire alarm or evacuation command Students should not be permitted to stop for coats, books, or other belongings. Evacuation drills should be orderly, and students should walk quietly, with faculty supervision at all times.

13 Evacuation Drills Teachers should stand at their classroom doors until pupils have filed out. They should check to see that windows and doors are closed but not locked, and follow pupils out of the building. They should take their class roll books with them. When students reach assembly areas, implement some form of student accountability (head count or buddy system should be implemented). Any discrepancy should be reported immediately to the principal. When students reach designated assembly areas, they should remain there until further instructions are given. Evacuation times should be recorded.

14 Tornado Drills Occupants of each room should be assigned to a designated area that is closest and safest. All second story students must move to the first floor. The best area is a basement or underground facility. If no basement exists, choose an area that has the smallest roof span area. Safer areas are where the walls are thickest and at least 30 feet away from exterior glass windows. Hallways with lockers are traditionally used areas, but small interior rooms can also work well. Students should drop and cover their heads with the arms.

15 Reverse Evacuation Used when students are not in class and must be brought into the classroom quickly. Procedures will vary depending on school. Students all get inside a classroom quickly Students stay calm and quiet so they can hear the teacher’s instructions Students pay attention and follow the instructions given Students quickly move to an area where they will be safe Students remain calm and quiet until the all clear is given

16 Common Sense Always communicate plans with parents Letter home at start of school year Information on school website Periodic updates in school newletter When doing drills, keep parents informed about procedures Inform in advance of any “full-scale” drills

17 Why? SCHOOL SAFETY DRILL DRAWS IRE Tuesday, October 31, FreeMarketNews.com A recent school safety drill in Michigan has upset some parents of the children involved. According to wire service reports, the drill in the town of Wyoming involved police officers in riot gear with weapons, who entered two classrooms at Lee Middle and High School on Thursday and announced a threat to the school. Students were unaware that a drill was being conducted, but were taken from their classrooms into the hall, patted down by officers and asked what they had in their pockets, according to local news reports. One angry parent reportedly put it this way: "Some of these kids were so scared, they just about wet their pants. I think it's wrong that the students and parents were not informed of this." Officers reportedly wore protective gear, including vests and helmets, and carried unloaded rifles (marked with colored tape to indicate they were not live weapons). Principal David Britten reportedly said students weren't told ahead of time "to make the drill as realistic as possible," although teachers were given notice just before it took place.

18 Drill Reporting To report school drills A web-form will be available at:

19 Texas School Safety Center Website


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