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Stepping Out of the Hallways and Into Your Classroom: Strategies that Support Your School-wide Efforts Maryann Judkins, M.A. University of Arizona June.

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Presentation on theme: "Stepping Out of the Hallways and Into Your Classroom: Strategies that Support Your School-wide Efforts Maryann Judkins, M.A. University of Arizona June."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stepping Out of the Hallways and Into Your Classroom: Strategies that Support Your School-wide Efforts Maryann Judkins, M.A. University of Arizona June 11, 2008 (p.1)

2 Objectives First impressions Getting PBIS language into the classroom (really) Universal considerations – Prevention When those things don’t work… Interventions for chronic behavioral errors You decide

3 First Impressions Set the tone Make it clear Keep it simple Classroom Be respectful  Enter quietly  Listen carefully and follow directions  Wait your turn to speak  Use inside voice Be responsible  Be on time  Be prepared and organized  Stay on task  Leave it clean Be safe  Always walk  Four on the floor  Use materials and equipment properly Class Rules 1.Be on time 2.Follow directions 3.Have materials ready when the bell rings 4.Talk only when permitted 5.Use polite speech and body language 6.Turn work in on time 7.Clean up after yourself 6 Pillars of Character Trustworthiness Respect Responsibility Fairness Caring Citizenship At Jellystone Elementary, we learn with love and laughter!

4 Getting the Language into the Classroom How many of you have PBIS plans that include defined expectations in classrooms? How many of you have 100% of your teachers buying into it and/or implementing it with fidelity?

5 Getting Buy-In 1.Teacher alignment – fit existing classroom rules into behavior matrix 2.Clarification – discuss rules v. procedures 3.Other strategies? Getting the Language into the Classroom

6 Universal Considerations – Prevention Behavior Management Principles 1.Management = putting restrictions and reinforcers in place 2.Changing behavior takes time What is your behavior management style? (p.2-6)

7 Universal Considerations – Prevention General Strategies 1.Designing physical space 2.Establish routines/procedures 3.Teach expectations and routines / procedures 4.Provide advanced organizers / precorrections

8 Universal Considerations – Prevention General Strategies 5.Keep students engaged 6.Provide a positive focus 7.Teacher talk (p. 7- 8) Caring School Community (CSC) – Class Meetings

9 Why Have Class Meetings? Build relationships Teach skills Teach character Promote understanding Build commitment to community Autonomy Belonging Competence

10 Listening Goal setting Planning Decision making Problem solving Reflection Defending a position Skills Developed Why Have Class Meetings?

11 Norm-Setting Planning/Decision-Making Check-In Problem-Solving Types of Meetings Why Have Class Meetings?

12 Circle up - open meeting Explain the purpose Establish ground rules Facilitate discussion Close meeting Class Meeting Process Why Have Class Meetings?

13 Benefits Thrive in atmosphere of trust and belonging Offers stability and predictability Allow opportunity for peer interaction Learn and practice social skills (CARES = Cooperation, Assertion, Responsibility, Empathy, and Self-control) Middle School (CPR = Circle of Power and Respect) Why Have Class Meetings? (Bechtel, 2002)

14 Process 1.Greeting: teach kids and model appropriate greetings 2.Sharing: practice in respectful interaction Establish ground rules Give format Model it Practice Debrief Middle School Why Have Class Meetings?

15 3.Group Activity: build team spirit, encourage cooperation, teach social and academic skills 4.News and Announcements Chart: information about the day Friendly salutation Announce class and school events Recognize student achievement Commemorate past events Interactive academic challenge Middle School Why Have Class Meetings?

16 Principles of Practice Relationships Fairness and equality Values Autonomy and responsibility

17 Facilitation Strategies Use wait time Use inclusive language Ask open ended questions Give non-judgmental responses Ask follow up questions to deepen thought

18 “Successful classroom management promotes self-regulation” (Weinstein, p. 9)

19 When Those Things Don’t Work… 1.Consistently enforce 2.Verbal v. Non-verbal VERBALNON-VERBAL Direct commands Stating student’s name Rule reminders Calling on student to participate Using student’s name in lesson Use of gentle humor I-messages Facial expression Eye contact Hand signals Proximity

20 When Those Things Don’t Work… Specific Strategies 1.Focus on students exhibiting expected behaviors 2.Re-direct 3.High probability requests 4.Reminder cards

21 A.C.T. Reminder Card Please review the A.C.T. statement. Remember, in the Vail Schools we… A re respectful and trustworthy C are about each other T ake responsibility Take PRIDE Sycamore wide… ACT!

22 When Those Things Don’t Work… Specific Strategies 5.Offer choice 6.Red-Yellow-Green 7.Mandatory private conference 8.Written reflections

23 Think Time: Overview Think Time is a classroom strategy used in partnership with other teachers. Three Main Elements 1.Precision Request 2.Time-out Procedure 3.Debriefing process

24 Think Time: Purpose Encourages Students to: Take more responsibility for their actions Identify appropriate classroom behaviors Encourages Teachers to: Realize that repeated warnings promote disruptive behaviors Disrupt low-level misbehavior early on Use positive communications w/ students

25 Think Time: Goals Think Time is designed to: Increase positive social exchanges and cut short negative interactions Provide students with feedback Give students opportunities to make plans for subsequent performance Create net gain in student on-task time

26 Think Time: Getting Started Prior to implementation Teaming Notify families Physical preparations Student orientation

27 Think Time: Steps A Five Step Process 1.Catch disruptive behavior early 2.Student moves to Think Time classroom 3.Think Time period & debriefing form 4.Check student responses 5.Rejoining the class

28 Think Time: Form Name ______________________ 1. What was your behavior? 2. What behavior do you need to display when you go back to your classroom? 3. Will you be able to do it? Yes __ No __ 4. Additional comments

29 Think Time: Planning Special Considerations Periodic evaluations Preparing substitutes Other consequences

30 Barrier to Effective Time- out Procedures “Perhaps the most important concept for teachers to recognize is that for time-out to be effective, students must want to participate in ongoing classroom activities. The term ‘time- out’ implies that the ‘time-in’ environment is reinforcing.” (Ryan, Sanders, Katsiyannis, & Yell, 2007)

31 For more information… The Think Time Strategy for Schools Kit (video, teacher’s guide, reproducibles - $58.95)

32 Chronic Behavioral Errors Specific Strategies 1.Behavior contracts 2.Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) 3.Self-monitoring

33 Chronic Behavioral Errors Self-Monitoring Date: __________

34 Chronic Behavioral Errors Self-Monitoring Name__________________ Date: __________ Put a mark down every time you talk out of turn.

35 Chronic Behavioral Errors Specific Strategies (continued) 4.Self-evaluation What did you do in class today? 1.How well did you behave? Were you attentive? Did you complete assignments? Did you contribute to class discussions? Did you think? Did you learn something? 1.What score would be accurate? (excellent) (poor)

36 You Decide For each situation, identify a verbal and non-verbal response: 1.Student writes on desk 2.Student is copying from another student’s paper 3.Student sharpens pencil during your presentation 4.Student calls out instead of raising hand

37 Thank you! Maryann Judkins, M.A. University of Arizona


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