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2009 Report to the COMMUNITY Welcome. Our Mission The Capital District Child Care Council is a resource and referral agency dedicated to promoting quality,

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Presentation on theme: "2009 Report to the COMMUNITY Welcome. Our Mission The Capital District Child Care Council is a resource and referral agency dedicated to promoting quality,"— Presentation transcript:

1 2009 Report to the COMMUNITY Welcome

2 Our Mission The Capital District Child Care Council is a resource and referral agency dedicated to promoting quality, accessible child care for all the Capital Region’s diverse communities. The Council assumes a leadership role in supporting children, parents, child care professionals, and employers through referral counseling, training and advocacy.

3 It is with a great deal of pride that we present our 2009 Capital District Child Care Council Report to the Community. This year has been full of exciting work dedicated to meeting the needs of the families, child care providers, and children in the greater Capital Region and beyond. As the local child care resource and referral agency, we are dedicated to improving the availability and quality of child care and assisting families in finding that care. We have advanced our mission this year by holding three great conferences for child care providers, increasing our outreach efforts to parents, and developing new partnerships on innovative projects, such as Bigelow Corners and the QualitystarsNY pilot. We even put the Council on Facebook! At the heart of all the Council’s work are the connections and collaborations with the other agencies in our region. We applaud all their efforts to improve the lives of children and families in our community. One such agency stands out this year for their efforts to improve literacy in Schenectady County. We are pleased to present our annual Community Collaborator Who Cares award this year to one of our great community partners, Literacy New York of the Greater Capital Region.* The Council has worked with Literacy New York for the past four years in the United Way of the Greater Capital Region’s LEAPE (Literacy Education and Parent/Provider Engagement) Partnership. Through the LEAPE partnership, the Council and other partner agencies have helped to improve the literacy and social emotional environment of many Schenectady nonprofit child care programs. Our partnership with Literacy New York also brought one of their Literacy Volunteers into our Child Development Associate (CDA) professional development classes where she was able to make a huge improvement in the success of the students. Our Council instructor had this to say, “The students have made amazing changes! They are much more confident due to their increase in vocabulary. (The volunteer) took the information that I was presenting and made templates for the students to use. (She) has had a positive impact in the lives of these students that will last a lifetime. The students now have the skills to pursue their dreams to be teachers in early care and education.” * On July 1, 2009 Literacy Volunteers of America- Mohawk/Hudson and Literacy NENY, two of the state’s leading literacy organizations, officially merged and a new entity, Literacy New York of the Greater Capital Region was created. We eagerly look forward to another year full of challenges and achievements Elizabeth Roberts-Laura, Board President Patricia Skinner, Executive Director A Message from the Board President and Executive Director Thank You!

4 Where We Work Infant Toddler Regional Services The Council provides Infant Toddler services to the following 17 counties Franklin Clinton Hamilton Essex Warren SaratogaFulton Washington Montgomery Rensselaer Schenectady Schoharie OtsegoAlbany Columbia Greene Delaware

5 Where We Work Clinton Hamilton Warren SaratogaFulton Washington Montgomery Rensselaer Schenectady Schoharie Albany Eat Well Play Hard in Child Care Settings The Council provides the Eat Well Play hard program to the following 9 counties

6 Where We Work Clinton Hamilton SaratogaFulton Montgomery Rensselaer Schenectady Albany Child Care Resource and Referral Services The Council provides Child Care Resource and Referral services to the following 6 counties

7 Parent Services In 2009, parent educators assisted 5,184 families in finding child care for 7,963 children. Of this number, 1,183 requests were from families who identified themselves as low income and eligible for child care subsidies. The Child Care Council conducted significant outreach activities to assist low income families in finding child care, raising the number of referrals for low income families from 295 in 1997 to 1,183 in Of the total referrals given in 2009, 2,715 were web-based. In order to help meet the demand for child care in the Capital Region, the Child Care Council works to develop quality child care programs. In 2009, over 325 prospective family child care providers attended family child care start-up information sessions. The Parent Services Department of the Council is also responsible for community outreach. The Council participated in over 20 community events this year. As a result, over 10,000 palm cards and over 7,000 summer camp catalog flyers were distributed to agencies, school districts, and businesses to educate parents and caregivers about quality child care options. Thank you so very much for coming to the Alpha Center Parenting Class and making your presentation. Know that you have changed lives for the better. ~Thank you, the Alpha Pregnancy Care Center Number of Child Care Programs in the Capital Region

8 The Child Care Council is a sponsor of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) for registered, licensed, and legally exempt child care providers in Albany, Fulton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady counties. This federal nutrition program reimburses child care providers for serving USDA approved meals and snacks to the children in their care. Child care providers are in a unique position to help shape a lifetime of healthy eating. CACFP supports providers who want to improve the quality of nutrition offered at a critical time in young children’s development. In 2009, the Council had up to 252 child care providers participate in the CACFP each month. A total of 47 new providers joined the CACFP under the Council’s sponsorship in Eat Well, Play Hard in Child Care Settings The Child Care Council employs two Registered Nurses as Child Care Health Consultants through funding from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). They bring years of experience to their role as Health Consultants. Over the last year the Nurses have assisted providers in meeting OCFS licensing requirements for administering medication through Medication Administration Training (MAT) and through development or renewal of their Health Care Plans. The Nurses have also continued to assist providers and parents to develop individualized care plans for children with special health care needs. The Child Care Health Consultants are involved with a large number of child care programs in the six counties the Council serves through Child Care Resource and Referral. Since 1990, the Toy Lending Library has served as an enriching resource to Capital Region child care providers. In 2009, more than $2,775 worth of new equipment was added to the Library’s inventory. YearNumber of children served 20055, , , , ,943 Provider Services Child and Adult Care Food Program Child Care Health Consultant Services Toy Lending Library Eat Well Play Hard in Child Care Settings (EWPHCCS) is a childhood obesity prevention program funded through a grant from the New York State Department of Health. Each grant year EWPHCCS is implemented by three Registered Dietitians in thirty eligible low- income child care centers across nine counties including Albany, Rensselaer, Schenectady, Saratoga, Fulton, Montgomery, Schoharie, Warren and Washington counties. The program consists of a series of six child sessions, six parent sessions and two staff trainings. The goals of EWPHCCS are to increase consumption of fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, as well as increase physical activity in preschool children. In calendar year 2009, EWPH sessions were offered in 27 centers to more than 694 children, 74 parents and 207 child care professionals. These numbers represent the number of individuals reached. Most children and parents have numerous contacts with the EWPH Dietitians.

9 The New York State Office of Children and Family Services requires that owners, operators, employees 16 years and older, as well as assistants, substitutes, household members over 18, and volunteers be fingerprinted. In 2009, the Child Care Council provided free fingerprinting services in an effort to help child care providers comply with this regulation. County# Served Albany 991 Fulton 14 Montgomery 34 Rensselaer 579 Saratoga 99 Schenectady 278 *As of October 07, The Child Care Council contracts with the Department of Social Services in Albany, Rensselaer, and Schenectady counties to provide registration services for family child care providers and school-age programs. The Council currently employs eight Registrars, one Coordinator, and a Director of Regulatory Services. The contract requires the Registrars to conduct inspections, investigate complaints of illegal child care and complaints about registered providers as well as process initial and renewal applications. Regulatory Services Child Care Registration Legally Exempt Enrollment Fingerprinting As of July 31, 2006 the Capital District Child Care Council became the Legally Exempt Enrollment Agency for Albany, Fulton, Montgomery, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady counties. Legally exempt providers deliver informal, non-registered child care for relatives and a limited number of non-relative children who receive subsidy from the parents’ local Department of Social Services. As the Enrollment Agency, the Council is responsible for reviewing and approving enrollment applications, as well as visiting a percentage of the legally exempt homes to inspect basic health and safety compliance. During the Council’s three years as the Legally Exempt Enrollment Agency, Enrollment Specialists have processed approximately 7,340 applications. As of October 2009, the number of approved legally exempt providers per county is: Albany: 503, Fulton: 85, Montgomery: 108, Rensselaer: 290, Saratoga: 150, Schenectady: 305.

10 Accreditation The New York State Afterschool Program Accreditation is rooted in an authentic self-study process designed to guide providers through a comprehensive examination of their program. The Council serves as a host agency for AfterSchool Works:NY and provides extensive support for program accreditation. The Council has championed the work of quality initiatives such as program accreditation and provider credentialing and offers technical assistance and training toward school age program excellence. Credential Preparation Credential Preparation Programs are available for family child care providers, child care center teachers and after school caregivers. Preparatory programs are designed for those who want to improve program skills and confidence in working with children in order to advance professionally. Conferences supported by the Council aim to provide a form of quality learning and discussion for people working in the areas of school age and early childhood education. In 2009, the Council hosted 3 conferences that provided over 500 participants with a wide choice of interactive workshops, seminars, discussion panels, and keynote presentations from leading speakers in the field. In 2010, conference efforts for school- age, early childhood and family child care will be unified to offer a high quality, professional development experience for all care providers. This program is focused on creating early learning opportunities for young children and life long learning for their families and caregivers. Monthly workshops are designed to give parents and informal caregivers easy, “doable” action steps to help young children learn. Through a support group participants learn to focus on the “teachable moments” found on grocery trips, through sorting laundry, or even on a walk to the bus stop. Informal caregivers are helped to learn about child care registration and business practices. Afterschool Program Accreditation and Credential Preparatory Programs Building Emotional Learning and Literacy (BELL) is a program based on the idea that the development of emotional regulation in early childhood is interrelated with emotional understanding and language skills. Supported by the United Way of the Greater Capital Region, this initiative presents an easy-to-use, easy-to understand approach involving young children’s own emergence into the world of literacy and social understanding. At the heart of each strategy are hands- on story activities, environmental print, and curriculum plans based on literacy components. Conferences Born Learning and Lifelong Learning Building Emotional Learning and Literacy Education Services The work group for Social Emotional Education Development (SEED) at Albany Community Action Program (ACAP) got off to a good start yesterday. [Your staff] did a nice job of facilitating and structuring the first session. They understand how the pieces need to connect and have a way of breaking this large project into manageable pieces. I think the group feels empowered to take on this project.”

11 For almost two decades, the General Electric Global Research Center (GRC) and the Council have partnered to bring training and assistance to child care facilities in the region. The Options Program allows GRC employees to select from a menu of training and support services. The program supports free on-site training, free admission to any Council sponsored event and consultation visits from a Council Early Childhood Educator. Over the past year the primary goal of the Infant Toddler Regional Coordinator has been to educate parents, caregivers and community members about the importance of respecting babies and following their cues in a way that fosters growth and development. To this end, the program activities have encouraged caregivers, through training and technical assistance, to respect the individual needs of infants and toddlers. Training topics include strategies for; forming secure reciprocal relationships through nurturing interactions, respectful and responsive communication with infants and toddlers, and the creation of caring environments. The program coordination works with adults to create materials and curriculum goals that are affordable, appropriate, and individualized. The goal of a DAP grant is to support appropriate practices in the family child care home. This simple grant opportunity offers training and technical assistance to support play-based instruction, active exploration, safe and friendly environments, integrated curriculum and caregiver reflection. Grant applications are available at the Council. A partnership between the Council and the Community Foundation of the Greater Capital Region has made increased quality school age care possible in four Albany based programs. The goal of this intensive training program is to move all four programs towards accreditation through AfterSchool Works:NY. To this end the after school staff at each program has been working very closely with Council staff to improve programming. Find a full report of the progress at Developmentally Appropriate Practice DAP Grants Community Foundation Project Regional Infant Toddler Services GE Options Education Services Social Emotional Development Services The mission of the Social Emotional Development Program is to create a working partnership among early childhood teachers, mental health consultants, and families to promote young children’s social and emotional development, foster emotional strength, and support skill development for life long success. Through the use of the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA), the program helps teachers and parents identify children’s risk and protective factors. The team runs a “Teacher Tipline” where caregivers and parents can phone in concerns and receive support and advice from one of the Social Emotional Development Specialists. Family Centered Child Care Approach Project The Family Centered Child Care Approach, funded by The Schenectady Foundation, supports the development of the child and family together. Family centered child care incorporates positive attitudes about working with parents and practical activities to serve the family. Schenectady County Community College has partnered with the Council to strengthen teacher pre- service training and to incorporate instruction regarding family centered concepts. Students at the college have gained a deeper understanding of family support principles through well designed, dynamic assignments.

12 Thank you to the following funders: The New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) The New York State Department of Health’s Eat Well Play Hard In Child Care Settings program The New York State Department of Health’s Child and Adult Care Food Program Albany County Department of Social Services Rensselaer County Department of Social Services Schenectady County Department of Social Services Albany Community Action Partnership Saratoga County Economic Opportunity Center The United Way of the Greater Capital Region AfterSchool Works! New York The Schenectady Foundation Community Foundation of the Greater Capital Region General Electric Global Research Center Altarum Institute Literacy New York of the Greater Capital Region The Child Care Council is audited on an annual basis by the accounting firm of Pryba, Tobin and Co. and had a clean audit, with no financial findings. Funding New York State Office of Children and Family Services New York State Department of Health Albany, Rensselaer, and Schenectady County Department of Social Services Education and Training United Way, Literacy New York of the Greater Capital Region, and The Schenectady Foundation Saratoga and Albany Head Start Projects Corporate, Membership, and Other

13 Board of Directors Officers Elizabeth Roberts Laura, President Jane Schwerd, Vice-President Kim Siciliano, Secretary Catherine Halayko, Treasurer Officers Elizabeth Roberts Laura, President Jane Schwerd, Vice-President Kim Siciliano, Secretary Catherine Halayko, Treasurer Members Andrea Adrian Marycay Doolittle Susan Gorman Peggy Grot Nancy Johnson Bernard Jones Kelly Landrio Susan Megna Nancy Rad Michael Ruzza Robert Topolski Members Andrea Adrian Marycay Doolittle Susan Gorman Peggy Grot Nancy Johnson Bernard Jones Kelly Landrio Susan Megna Nancy Rad Michael Ruzza Robert Topolski Retired in 2009 Kimlee Marquise, Vice President Brandi Alund-Welsh, Member Retired in 2009 Kimlee Marquise, Vice President Brandi Alund-Welsh, Member Thank you for your dedication and service to the Capital District Child Care Council.

14 Child Care Council Staff Kathy Arduini, Schenectady County Registrar Amanda Barry, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Paulann Beardsley, Receptionist Jean Bottillo-Fausili, MS, RD, Registered Dietitian Fernanda Carranza, Bi-Lingual Registrar Doris Castro, Food Program Home Visitor Heather Cookingham, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Marsha Cooper, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Carol Cornell, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Tanya Dean, Albany County Registrar Alexis DeLaTorre, Albany County Registrar Sheri Dushane, Child Care Center Coordinator Lori Edwards, Early Childhood Educator Katie Egglefield, MPH, Research Scientist 1 Colleen Faragon, Early Childhood Educator Amy File, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Anne Gresco, Family Child Care Coordinator LaToya Grimes, Albany County Registrar MaryEllen Gugie, Director of Provider Services Michelle Hall, Schenectady County Registrar Jill Hodge, MSW, Social Emotional Development Educator Tricia Howland, CIRS, Director of Parent Services Jeanne Jones, Ms.Ed., Finance Assistant Donna Jennings, Food Program Coordinator Abbe Kovacik, Ms.Ed., Director of Education Pam Leganczuk, Schenectady County Registrar Jessica Lynch, Food Program Home Visitor Lea Maggiulli, School-Age Child Care Educator Melissa McGuire, Referral Counselor Mary Miranda, Child Care Development Specialist Patti Mueller, Legally Exempt Enrollment Coordinator Maricelis Plata, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Kristy Rivera, LCSW, Social Emotional Development Educator Cheryl Samborin, Director of Regulatory Services Arlene Schmidt, Family Child Care Educator Cherri Shultes, Rensselaer County Registrar Lynn Siebert, School-Age Child Care Coordinator Patricia Skinner, Ms.Ed., Executive Director Jenna Smith, Dietitian Kate Smith, Director of Marketing and Technology Darlene Snyder, Legally Exempt Enrollment Educator Wendy Sullivan, Ms.Ed., Regional Infant/Toddler Educator Heather Sweet, Early Childhood Educator Eileen Tuohy, Registration Coordinator Barbara Vickery, RN, Child Care Health Consultant Keely Weise, Fiscal Director Lynda Weismantel, Director of Operations Gail Williams, Administrative Support Specialist Jean Wiseman, RN, Child Care Health Consultant Coordinator Jessica Yonally, MS, RD, Eat Well Play Hard Coordinator

15 Thank You!


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