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1 The College Game Plan for the Student Athlete Preparing for a career as a Student Athlete at the Collegiate level.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The College Game Plan for the Student Athlete Preparing for a career as a Student Athlete at the Collegiate level."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The College Game Plan for the Student Athlete Preparing for a career as a Student Athlete at the Collegiate level

2 2 The following information is for the targeted populations  High school students who hope to participate in college athletics at an NCAA college or university  Parents and legal guardians  High school counselors and athletics administrators

3 3 The Making of the Student Athlete  The Student-Athlete must consider the following components as they develop their game plan:  athletic recruiting  college selection  financial aid  admissions  life as a college athlete

4 4 Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level  Men's Basketball  Less than one in 35, or approximately 3.0 percent, of high school senior boys playing interscholastic basketball will go on to play men's basketball at a NCAA member institution.  Less than one in 75, or approximately 1.2 percent, of NCAA male senior basketball players will get drafted by a National Basketball Association (NBA) team.  Approximately three in 10,000, or approximately 0.03 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic basketball will eventually be drafted by an NBA team.

5 5 Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level  Women's Basketball  About 3.3 percent, or approximately three in 100, of high school senior girls interscholastic basketball players will go on to play women's basketball at a NCAA member institution.  About one in 100, or approximately 1.0 percent, of NCAA female senior basketball players will get drafted by a Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) team.  Approximately one in 5,000, or approximately 0.02 percent of high school senior girls playing interscholastic basketball will eventually be drafted by a WNBA team.

6 6 Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level  Football  About 5.7 percent, or approximately one in 17, of all high school senior boys playing interscholastic football will go on to play football at a NCAA member institution.  About 1.8 percent, or approximately one in 50, of NCAA senior football players will get drafted by a National Football League (NFL) team.  Approximately eight in 10,000, or approximately 0.08 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic football will eventually be drafted by an NFL team.

7 7 Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level  Baseball  Approximately three in 50, or about 6.1 percent, of high school senior boys interscholastic baseball players will go on to play men's baseball at a NCAA member institution.  Less than ten in 100, or about 9.4 percent, of NCAA senior male baseball players will get drafted by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team.  Approximately one in 200, or approximately 0.45 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic baseball will eventually be drafted by an MLB team.

8 8 Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level  Men's Soccer  Less than three in 50, or about 5.5 percent, of high school senior boys interscholastic soccer players will go on to play men's soccer at a NCAA member institution.  Less than one in 50, or about 1.7 percent, of NCAA senior male soccer players will be drafted by a Major League Soccer (MLS) team.  Approximately one in 1,250, or approximately 0.07 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic soccer will eventually be drafted by an MLS team.

9 9 NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILTY VS. ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR ADMISSIONS INTO COLLEGE  Meeting the NCAA academic /eligibility rules does not guarantee your admissions into a college. The NCAA academic rules allow you to be eligible to represent the NCAA member institution on the athletic field of competition.  Applying for admission to the academic institution follows a different set of standards than the NCAA academic / eligibility rules

10 10 INFORMATION REGARDING ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS  INFORMATION REGARDING ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS  It is important to understand several points about athletics  scholarships from Divisions I and II schools:  All athletics scholarships awarded by NCAA institutions are limited to one year and are renewable annually.  There is no such award as a four-year athletics scholarship.  Athletics scholarships may be renewed annually for a maximum of five years within a six-year period of continuous college attendance.  Athletics aid may be canceled or reduced at the end of each year for any reason.

11 11 What is the NCAA?  National Collegiate Athletic Association  The NCAA membership includes:  326 active Division I members;  281 active Division II members; and  421 active Division III members.  One of the differences among the three divisions is that colleges and universities in Divisions I and II may offer athletics scholarships  Division III colleges and universities may not.

12 12 NCAA DIV I  Division I  Division I member institutions have to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender. Each playing season has to be represented by each gender as well.

13 13 NCAA DIV II  Division II institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender.

14 14 NCAA DIV III  Division III institutions have to sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women, with two team sports for each gender, and each playing season represented by each gender. There are minimum contest and participant minimums for each sport. Division III athletics features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability

15 15  Go to  Left hand margin – click on Academics and Athletes  Drop Down Menu – Eligibility and Recruiting  Click Information for the College Bound Student and Parents  Click on “Click here to view Guide” Please read publication  On Same “Information for the College Bound Student and Parents:  Click on the “Eligibility Standard Quick Reference Sheet (Div I and Div II)- Please Print and Read

16 16 Eligibility Center  Go to  Left hand margin – click on Academics and Athletes  Drop Down Menu – Eligibility and Recruiting  Click Information for the College Bound Student and Parents  Click on “Eligibility Center Website” You should be at:  https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/common/ https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/common/  Click on “Prospective Student-Athlete”  Click on “U.S. Students Register Here”  Please read and follow directions carefully while completing Eligibility Center Registration

17 17 What are the four (4) components / documentation of the NCAA Eligibility Center process?  Online Registration Form  Official High School Transcripts from ALL High Schools Attended  Official SAT or ACT test scores  Amateur Athletic Status Form

18 18 INITIAL ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION Division I 2008 and Later  If you enroll in a Division I college on or after August 1, 2008, and  want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must:  Graduate from high school  Complete these 16 core courses:  - 4 years of English  - 3 years of math (algebra 1 or higher)  - 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school)  - 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical science  - 2 years of social science  - 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, non doctrinal religion or philosophy);  Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your core courses; and  Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core course grade-point average and test score sliding scale on page 9 (for example, a core-course grade-point average needs an 860 SAT).

19 19 NCAA DIV I QUALIFIER VS NON QUALIFIER  You will be a qualifier if you meet the academic requirements  listed above. As a qualifier, you:  Can practice or compete for your college or university duringyour first year of college;  Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and  Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.  You will be a non qualifier if you do not meet the academic requirements listed above. As a non qualifier, you:  Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college  Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; and  Can play only three seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year (to earn a fourth season you must complete at least 80 percent of your degree requirements before beginning your fifth year of college).

20 20 Initial Eligibility Information Division II 2005 and Later  If you enroll in a Division II college and want to participate in  athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must:  Graduate from high school;  Complete these 14 core courses:  - 3 years of English  - 2 years of math (algebra 1 or higher)  - 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school)  - 2 extra years of English, math or natural or physical science  - 2 years of social science  - 3 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, non doctrinal religion or philosophy);  Earn a grade-point average or better in your core courses; and  Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.  There is no sliding scale in Division II.

21 21 NCAA Div II - Qualifier  As a qualifier, you:  Can practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;  Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and  Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year

22 22 NCAA Div II – Partial Qualifier  You will be a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the  academic requirements listed above, but you have graduated from  high school and meet one of the following:  The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68; or  Completion of the 14 core courses with a core-course grade-point average.  As a partial qualifier, you:  Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first  year of college;  Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college;  Cannot compete during your first year of college; and  Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

23 23 NCAA Div II Non-Qualifier  You will be a non qualifier if you did not graduate from high school, or, if you graduated and are missing both the core-course grade-point average or minimum number of core courses and the required ACT or SAT scores.  As a non qualifier, you:  Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college;  Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need- based financial aid; and  Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

24 24 Your Info Interview with the Coach  Areas of concern regarding your choice of college should include:  Athletics  Academics  College Life as a student and athlete  Financial Aid

25 25 Athletic Questions  What positions will I play on your team? It is not always obvious. Most coaches want to be flexible, so you might not receive a definite answer.  What other players may be competing at the same position? The response could give you an idea of when you can expect to be a starter.  Will I be redshirted my first year? The school's policy on redshirting may impact you both athletically and academically.  What expectations do you have for training and conditioning? This will reveal the institution's commitment to a training and conditioning program.  How would you best describe your coaching style? Every coach has a particular style that involves different motivational techniques and discipline. You need to know if a coach's teaching style matches your learning style.  Who else are you recruiting for my position? Coaches may consider other student-athletes for every position.

26 26 Academic Questions  What percentage of players on scholarship graduate? The response will suggest the school's commitment to academics. You might want to ask two follow-up questions:  a. What percentage of incoming students eventually  graduate?  b. What is the current team's grade-point average?  What academic support programs are available to student- athletes? Look for a college that will help you become a better student.  If I have a diagnosed and documented disability, what  kind of academic services are available? Special academic services may help you achieve your academic goals.  How many credit hours should I take in season and out of season? It is important to determine how many credit hours are required for your degree and what pace you will follow to obtain that degree.  Are there restrictions in scheduling classes around practice? NCAA rules prevent you from missing class for practice.

27 27 College Life  What is a typical day for a student-athlete? The answer will give you a good idea of how much time is spent in class, practice, study and travel. It also will give you a good indication of what coaches expect.  What are the residence halls like? The response should give you a hint of how comfortable you would be in your room, study areas, community bathrooms and at the laundry facilities. Also ask about the number of students in a room, co-ed dorms and the rules governing life in the residence halls.  Must student-athletes live on campus? If “yes,” ask about exceptions.

28 28 Financial Aid  How much financial aid is available for both the academic  year and summer school? What does your scholarship  cover?  How long does my scholarship last? Most people think a “full ride” is good for four years, but athletics financial aid is available on a one-year, renewable basis.  What are my opportunities for employment while I am a student? Find out if you can be employed in season, out of season or during vacation periods.  Exactly how much will the athletics scholarship be? What will and will not be covered? It is important to understand what college expenses your family is responsible for so you can arrange to pay those. Educational expenses can be paid  with student loans and government grants, but it takes time to apply for them. Find out early so you can get something lined up.  Am I eligible for additional financial aid? Are there any restrictions? Sometimes a student-athlete cannot accept a certain type of scholarship because of NCAA limitations. If you will be receiving other scholarships, let the coach and financial aid officer know so they can determine if you may accept additional dollars.

29 29 New NCAA Legislation for Div I Non Qualifiers only  Adopted: : To specify that in order for a transfer student from a two-year college who was not a qualifier to be eligible for institutional financial aid, practice and competition during his or her first academic year in residence, he or she must have successfully completed six semester or eight quarter hours of English and three semester or four quarter hours of mathematics at the two-year college that are transferable toward any baccalaureate degree program at the certifying institution.  Effective: August 1, 2009, for student-athletes initially enrolling full time in a collegiate institution on or after August 1, 2009.


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