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Making Connections to The Valley of the Moon “Schools should not be places where old people go every day to do the work for young people…All of our teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "Making Connections to The Valley of the Moon “Schools should not be places where old people go every day to do the work for young people…All of our teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Making Connections to The Valley of the Moon “Schools should not be places where old people go every day to do the work for young people…All of our teaching and learning should move learners toward independence. No one learns to function and think independently by listening to someone else talk all day. Kids don’t learn much when the teacher does most of the work. Readers get better at reading and thinking by doing the reading and thinking. And learners learn more by doing the work. Harvey and Goudvis— Strategies that Work In this case I have done part of the work, collecting images and excerpts concerning the factual background of The Valley of the Moon. Your job is to connect explicitly this collection to the specifics of the novel. Begin by taking notes of possible connections for each slide.

2 The Valley of the Moon and Real Life

3 Jack London reading in Heinold’s Bar1886 —no connection; just an awesome photo

4 Charmian 1909 “Berkeley Bohemian Attire” —cap and lingerie designed herself Jo Ann Stubb, Fashion Historian

5 1910: Jack London aboard The Roamer on the Delta

6 Ambrose Bierce—Journalist and Writer

7 Clara Charmian Kittridge London in riding clothes with Possum

8 Charmian’s Parents “Charmian was born in 1871 to poet Dayelle "Daisy" Wiley and California hotelier Willard Kittredge. After Daisy died of valley fever in 1877, the Wiley clan insisted that Charmian be sent to Oakland be raised by her aunt, Ninetta Wiley Eames. She would not see her elderly and ailing father after that.” Clarice Stasz 2006

9 Working in a Laundry In 1890, when this photograph was made, laundry women worked from morning until midnight, many of them living in dormitories, four beds to a small room, poorly nourished, and earning only $8 to $10 a month. In July 1900, San Francisco’s steam- laundry workers applied for a charter to the Laundry Workers’ International Union. Despite local opposition to include women, the majority of laundry women organized and joined within the first sixteen weeks. By April 1901, employment conditions were effectively revolutionized Elrick— “Social Conflicts and the Politics of Reform: Mayor James D. Phelan and the San Francisco Waterfront Strike of 1901”

10 Local Scene

11 Known as “Johnnie London” till Age 13 “When he graduated from the eighth grade, London took the little money he had saved from his jobs that hadn’t been turned over to his family, bought a fourteen-foot skiff, and went about teaching himself how to sail. The San Francisco Bay and Oakland Estuary, full of treacherous shallows, strong currents, and commercial and fishing traffic, was no easy training ground for an inexperienced boy of just fourteen. Yet he toiled away, learning by trial and error, seeking to “master the manners of little craft until their management should become automatic to hand and brain.” Excerpt from modern blog “Libations Too”, with quote from Jack London’s “The Joy of Small Boat Sailing” 1912

12 “…with the locked-out teamsters.” Once trapped, the crowd began throwing bricks and hurling insults at the men, who responded by pulling out revolvers and firing shots in the air and into the swarming crowd. Reports of strikers and strike-supporters beating and stoning nonunion workers became commonplace. According to one union picket, strikebreakers who continued to move cargo after being warned had their arms “placed on an angle from street to curb and broken with pressure from a pipe or an iron bar.” Elrick— “Social Conflicts and the Politics of Reform: Mayor James D. Phelan and the San Francisco Waterfront Strike of 1901”

13 Nettie Wiley Eames Payne—Charmian London’s aunt and guardian

14 Charmian London at her aunt’s cabin off Warm Springs Road in Glen Ellen

15 Jack London, Pugilist

16 Jack London’s Glen Ellen Property Hill Ranch "There are 130 acres in the place, and they are 130 acres of the most beautiful, primitive land to be found in California. There are great redwoods on it, some of them thousands of years old... in fact, the redwoods are as fine and magnificent as any to be found anywhere outside the tourists groves. Also there are great firs, tanbark oaks, maples, live-oaks, white-oaks, black-oaks, madrono and manzanita galore. There are canyons, several streams of water, many springs... I have been riding all over these hills, looking for just such a place, and I must say that I have never seen anything like it." – 1905 Kohler and Frohling Ranch "I am buying seven hundred acres of land that rounds out and connects my present two ranches, giving me miles of frontage on three creeks, and some magnificent mountain land, to say nothing of the timber – real wild country." – 1910

17 Jack London, Glen Ellen CA

18 George Sterling, California Poet, Resident of Carmel, CA

19 Jack and Charmian

20 The Carmel “Crowd” George Sterling, Mary Austin, Jack London, Jimmy Hopper


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