Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Disasters: What We Plan For…. John F Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Senior Director, AAALAC International.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Disasters: What We Plan For…. John F Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Senior Director, AAALAC International."— Presentation transcript:

1 Disasters: What We Plan For…. John F Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Senior Director, AAALAC International

2 Disaster Planning – new?  1965 Edition – Section H – Emergencies “Provision should be made for emergency care, day or night. Standard operating procedures for emergencies must be listed. These should include such items as- (a) Name of responsible person or alternate (b) Means of contacting responsible person or alternate”

3 Disaster Planning – new?  1972 Edition – Section I.D – Provisions for emergency care “Provision must be made for the emergency care of animals….. The objective must be to assure that animals will be cared for should an emergency arise.”

4 Disaster Planning – new?  1978 Edition – Section C.4 – Provisions for emergency, weekend and holiday care “Provision must be made for the emergency care of animals. Institutional security personnel and fire or police officials should know how to reach a person responsible for the animals. This can be accomplished by prominently posting the names of such responsible persons in the animal facilities, or listing them with the institution’s central telephone center or security department. The objective is to ensure that animals will be cared for in case of emergencies.

5 Disaster Planning – new?  1985 Edition – Emergency, weekend and holiday care “In the event of an emergency, institutional security personnel and fire or police officials should be able to contact those people responsible for the animals. This can be accomplished by prominently posting names and phone numbers in the animal facilities, or by listing them with the security department or telephone center.

6 Disaster Planning – new?  1996 Edition – Emergency, weekend and holiday care “…In the event of an emergency, institutional security personnel and fire or police officials should be able to reach people responsible for the animals…... A disaster plan that takes into account both personnel and animals should be prepared as part of the overall safety plan for the animal facility. The colony manger or veterinarian responsible for the animals should be a member of the appropriate safety committee at the institution. He or she should be an “official responder” within the institution and should participate in the response to a disaster….”

7 2011 Guide - Chapter 2: page 35  Disaster plan “Facilities must therefore have a disaster plan.” “The plan should define the actions necessary to prevent animal pain, distress, and deaths due to loss of systems such as those that control ventilation, cooling, heating, or provision of potable water.”

8 2011 Guide - Chapter 2: page 35 Disaster plan - other key aspects  Developed with PI’s  If animals cannot be relocated or protected – humane euthanasia  ID essential personnel with advanced training  Personnel safety and access  Plans should be part of overall institutional plan coordinated by the IO  Plan should be integrated into broader, area-wide planning (local law enforcement and emergency personnel)

9

10 Trend Analysis – reports of disasters  From 2009 – April 2014  Reports of any “disaster” that was judged to be “significant”  Tabulate results  Any trends emerge as common challenges?

11 Findings  Total of 74 reports (since 2009)  Categories of findings:  Earthquake  Flood  Hurricane  Terrorism  Fire  Power outage  Tornado  Other weather  Physical Plant  Other

12 # Reported Events - Category

13 # Reports - Category

14 Findings  Physical Plant – sub categories  HVAC  Steam  Water  Malfunction/breakage  Accident  Transport

15 # Reports – Physical Plant 78%

16 Examples of Physical Plant Disasters System/equipment malfunction  Steam control – overheating  Water – failures in drinking water system  Building flood – burst water main  Aquatic species – catastrophic equipment failure (overheated water, water valve failure, etc., tanks ruptured)  Failed heating systems for neonates

17 Examples of Physical Plant Disasters HVAC System Failure  Temperature excursions - predominately a problem with overheating  Last Winter – some incidents of hypothermia (failure of heating systems)

18 Reports by sector

19 Site Visit Findings Since Fall 2011 Program Components

20 Site Visit Findings Since Fall-2011 Since 2009…. ~ 6% of disaster plans were deficient

21 Institution type – deficiencies related to the disaster plan

22 Common Disaster Plan-related Deficiencies  Institutional plan did not include the animal program  Insufficient contingencies for animal care  Not all animals were considered in the disaster plan (remote sites and satellite facilities)  Basic contingencies for animal care and euthanasia were not considered  Lack of consideration for essential personnel and their training  Insufficient detail

23 Site Visit Findings – Physical Plant Since Fall-2011

24 Site Visit Findings - HVAC Since Fall-2011

25 Trend Analysis  The largest category of disasters reported is “institutional disasters” (72%)  System/equipment & HVAC malfunctions occur most frequently (78%)  Of “regional disasters” – power outages and hurricanes are most frequent (14% combined)

26 Trend Analysis cont’d  The most frequently reported disasters occurred without warning (response time?)  6% of existing disaster plans were deficient (site visits)  Physical plant disasters are most common and HVAC deficiencies are among the most common issues cited on site visits……..

27 Thank You! Questions? Comments? AAALAC International AAALAC International


Download ppt "Disasters: What We Plan For…. John F Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Senior Director, AAALAC International."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google