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GREEN HOMES AND BUILDINGS 3. In This Chapter  What makes a home or building green?  Green design principles  Green construction principles  Building.

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Presentation on theme: "GREEN HOMES AND BUILDINGS 3. In This Chapter  What makes a home or building green?  Green design principles  Green construction principles  Building."— Presentation transcript:

1 GREEN HOMES AND BUILDINGS 3

2 In This Chapter  What makes a home or building green?  Green design principles  Green construction principles  Building envelope  Systems  Landscaping  Cost/benefit  Green vendors 3-1

3 What Makes a Home or Building Green? 3-2  For many consumers, “greenness” determined by whether home or building:  is LEED certified  is ENERGY STAR qualified  has a HERS rating

4 LEED Certification  Third-party certification program  Sets design, construction, and operational standards for high performance green buildings  Awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council 3-3

5 LEED Certification 3-4  Available for:  New construction and major renovations  Existing buildings  Commercial interiors  Core and shell  Schools (K–12), retail, healthcare  Homes  Neighborhood development

6 LEED Certification 3-5  Properties qualify by earning points in:  Sustainable sites  Water efficiency  Energy and atmosphere  Materials and resources  Indoor environment quality  Innovation and design process

7 LEED Certification 3-6  Available certifications:  Certified  Silver  Gold  Platinum

8 Case Study 3.1 3-7  National Association of REALTORS ® Washington, D.C. headquarters  First newly constructed building in metropolitan Washington area to receive LEED silver status from USGBC

9 Case Study 3.1 3-8  Landscaping plan using native plant species  Efficient HVAC systems and a high- performance glass curtain wall  Zero use of CFC-refrigerants  High-recycled building materials  Carbon dioxide monitoring system

10 LEED Certification 3-9  Time-intensive and complex process  Detailed documentation required  Independent verification must be completed by LEED AP

11 ENERGY STAR 3-10  Popular program that helps consumers identify energy-efficient products  Also a qualification awarded to homes and buildings

12 ENERGY STAR Qualified Homes 3-11  15% more energy efficient  Available for homes of three stories or less, including: –Single –Attached –Low-rise multifamily –Manufactured –Modular –Log –Concrete

13 ENERGY STAR for Buildings 3-12  Available for commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings  Uses point scale that analyzes energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality

14 Home Energy Rating System 3-13  Energy-evaluation standard maintained by RESNET  Base line rating is 100, which represents standard new home  Rating of 0 represents a zero- energy home nose

15 Different Shades of “Greenness”?  Are homes and buildings without a national certification less green?  Depends on who you ask  Green homes and buildings share: –Integrated into environment –Achieving sustainability –Positively impacting human health and comfort 3-14

16 The Green Home or Building 3-15

17 Green Design Principles 3-16  Design choices not made in isolation  Home or building is interconnected with neighborhood, community, and earth

18 Integrated Design Team 3-17  Developer  Architect  Contractor  Landscape architect  Structural engineer  Mechanical engineer  Interior designer  Acoustical designer  Lighting designer  Property manager  Maintenance engineer  Plumber  Other real estate professionals

19 General Goals of Design Team 3-18  Reduce exposure to toxic materials  Conserve energy and resources  Minimize ecological impact  Use renewable energy and materials  Sustainably harvested  Sustainably manufactured  Protect and restore ecosystems  Support alternatives to fossil-fueled vehicles Source: American Institute of Architects, www.aia.org

20 Green Design Factors 3-19  Size  Community impact and relationships  Climate  Sun  Lighting  Water  Material selection  Connection to nature

21 Aesthetics 3-20  Myth: green homes and buildings must look “unattractive” or “unappealing”  Appealing aesthetics ensure longevity Source: Reprinted with permission of the American Society of Interior Designers, Inc. and U.S. Green Building Council, “REGREEN Guidelines 2008,” www.regreenprogram.org. ASID & USGBC REGREEN Residential Remodeling Guidelines, Case Study Home – Major Addition

22 Green Construction Principles 3-21  Careful planning, coordination, and monitoring  Real estate professional can:  Become familiar with differences between conventional and green construction  Converse with architects, contractors, inspectors  Ensure proper documentation

23 Selecting and Using a Site 3-22  Local and regional green goals  Sustainable orientation of building on site  Storm water management

24 Building Materials and Methods  Advanced framing techniques  Sourcing of materials  FSC (see Figure 3.6)  Green Seal (see Figure 3.7)  Low-VOC materials  Low-waste construction 3-23

25 Exercise: Reducing Construction Waste 3- Old growth timberUse in interior walls as noise-deadening materials Uncontaminated woodClean and use as high-quality architectural millwork Structural steelRemix and store for touch-up work DrywallReturn to supplier for reuse or recycling Cabinet fixturesDonate to nonprofit organization for home remodeling for low-income family Excess insulationShred for mulch Packaging materialsDe-paper and crush gypsum to use as soil amendment in moderate quantities Excess paintRecycle

26 Building Envelope 3-25  Separates exterior from interior  Consists of:  Below-grade systems  Exterior walls  Fenestration systems  Roofs

27 Environmentally Friendly Materials  Materials for construction of building envelope  Formaldehyde-free insulation  Low- or no-VOC adhesives, caulks, and sealants  FSC-certified wood  Wood I-joists (see Figure 3.8) 3-26 Source: Alameda County Waste Management Authority & Source Reduction and Recycling Board, Home Remodeling Green Guidelines, www.stopwaste.org.

28 HVAC 3-27  Must be rightsized  Heating, cooling, and ventilation systems must be appropriate for climate and structure  HVAC must integrate with building envelope

29 HVAC 3-28  Energy-efficient technologies:  Radiant floor heating (see Figure 3.9)  Active solar heating  Evaporative cooler (see Figure 3.10) Sources: The Aldo Leopold Foundation, Leopold Legacy Center Construction Journal, Report 15.2—Mechanical Systems, www.aldoleopold.org. California Energy Commission, Consumer Energy Center, www.consumerenergycenter.org.www.aldoleopold.orgwww.consumerenergycenter.org

30 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) 3-29  Serious concern for many consumers  Poor IAQ results in reduced productivity and adverse health effects

31 Indoor Air Pollutants and Sources 3-30 Combustion- related Oil, gas, kerosene, cigarettes, burning wood Asbestos Certain insulations, shingles, millboards, floor and ceiling tiles VOCs Paints, lacquers, paint strippers, adhesive removers, carpet, cleaning supplies, pesticides, wood preservatives, furniture, cabinets Lead Lead-based paint, contaminated soil, dust, and drinking water PesticidesInsecticides, termiticides, and disinfectants Radon Earth and rock beneath home, well water, building materials MoldOutdoor environment

32 Reducing Off-gassing 3-31  Use:  Low- or no-VOC paints and adhesives  Low-VOC wallpaper  Boards certified to low- formaldehyde standards  “Green Lablel” carpeting and adhesives

33 Achieving Good IAQ 3-32  Foundation  Impermeable to moisture and air  Radon-resistant  Inhospitable to pests  Free or low in VOCs  Framing  Insulated with low-formaldehyde emission standards  Constructed with high efficiency windows  Weatherstripped and air-sealed

34 Achieving Good IAQ 3-33  HVAC  Sealed ducts and air handlers  Duct mastic on duct joints  Corrosion-resistant coil drain pans  Dehumidification equipment within thermal enclosure  Insulated ducts, plenums, and trunks  EPA-certified wood-burning fireplaces  High efficiency filters  Make-up air for components such as furnaces  Solar attic fan  Whole-house fan

35 Lighting 3-34  Daylighting  Reduces energy consumption  Optimizes livability and productivity  Decreases need for power generated by pollutant-emitting plants  Other lighting fixtures  IC-AT recessed lighting fixtures  CFLs  LED lamps  Dimmers, timers, photosensors, motion detectors

36 Energy Diagnostics  Energy model  Energy assessment  Balometer  Blower door (Fig. 3.13)  Coheat test  Duct blaster (Fig. 3.14)  Electric moisture meter 3-35  Power meter  Pressure meter  Thermal infrared camera

37 Blower Door Test 3-36 Source: Reprinted with permission of NAHB Research Center’s Tool Base Services, www.toolbase.org/PDF/Bestpractices/DiagnosticTools.pdf

38 Duct Blaster Test 3-37

39 Thermal Infrared Camera and Imaging 3-38 Source: Reprinted with permission of NAHB Research Center’s Tool Base Services, www.toolbase.org/PDF/Bestpractices/DiagnosticTools.pdf

40 Water Conservation and Management 3-39  Storm water management  Landscaping  Water-conserving toilets  Flow-reducing showerheads  Chlorine filter on showerheads  Insulation on hot and cold water pipes  Water filtration on faucets  Dishwashers  Low-flow aerators on faucets  Efficient appliances  Washing machines  Water heater jacket insulation  On-demand hot water circulation pump  Solar water heating  Greywater reuse

41 Greywater 3-40  Non-industrial wastewater  May be used in applications that do not require potable water  Qualified professionals should be consulted

42 Landscaping 3-41  Use existing site  Use native plants  Group plants  Employ xeriscaping  Use adequate amounts of mulch  Mulch with recycled- content or reused materials  Compost  Use organic fertilizers  Incorporate passive solar design  Install a green roof

43 Green Roof 3-42 Source: Reprinted with permission of American Society of Landscape Architects, www.asla.org.

44 Waste Management and Recycling  Convenience of recycling  Built-in recycling center  Allows waste to be separated easily 3-37

45 Cost/Benefit  Usually a cost premium  Direct, tangible benefits  Unit and installation costs  Utility savings  Indirect, intangible benefits  Eco-friendliness  Improved health and comfort 3-44

46 Life-cycle Cost Analysis  Total cost of a home or building, its materials, and its systems  Initial  Energy and water  Operation, maintenance, and repair  Capital improvement and replacement  Conversion or disposal  Other costs  Example: ground-source thermal pump 3-45

47 Cost/Benefit Talking Points 3-46  Specific appliances  Value perception  Design and engineering  Testing  Rebates and incentives

48 Remodeling and Retrofitting  Up-front costs  Financial incentives and benefits  Long-term payoffs  Reduced insurance costs  Cost segregation  Green upgrades instead of certification  Sealing air leaks  CFLs, occupancy sensors  Certified green cleaning products 3-47

49 Green Vendors  Finding green vendors  USGBC LEED AP Directory  Professional Associations  Working with green vendors  Research thoroughly  Ask questions 3-48


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