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Boston University: April 13, 2007. " ….. we must be second to none in the application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society,

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Presentation on theme: "Boston University: April 13, 2007. " ….. we must be second to none in the application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Boston University: April 13, 2007

2 " ….. we must be second to none in the application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society, which we find in our country. … - Dr. Vikram A. Sarabhai  Frank Admission : Existence of abundant down- to-earth problems of development.  Prudent assertion : Science &Technology being crucial apparatus for development.  Commitment : Science &Technology for socio- economic benefits in preference to display of grandeur. Military Superiority Technological Dominance Display of Grandeur Indian Space Program is very different. Very deeply rooted to the society SPACE POLICY

3 The Humble beginning

4 Mandate and Mantra Application of Space Technology for the benefit of the common man

5  India today runs and maintains its own space program  Remarkable benefits are being provided to the common man in timely & Cost- effective fashion DID IT WORK ?

6 INSAT FAMILY INSAT-1 INSAT-2C,D INSAT-2A,B INSAT-2E INSAT-3B INSAT-4B INSAT-3D INSAT-3E DTH APPLE GSAT-2 INSAT-3A * ONE OF THE LARGEST DOMESTIC SATCOM SYSTEMS - Ku, C, S BANDS * MULTI-PURPOSE : TELECOM, TV, METEOROLOGY 200 TRANSPONDERS, GLOBAL/DOMESTIC BEAMS EDUSAT (GSAT-3)

7 BROADCAST  Television Broadcasting  Direct To Home (DTH)  TV & Radio Networking METEOROLOGICAL  Meteorological Imaging  Data Collection Platform  Disaster Warning OTHERS  Mobile Satellite Service  Search and Rescue  Satellite Navigation  Speech Circuits On Trunk Routes  VSAT Connectivity COMMUNICATION INSAT SYSTEM APPLICATIONS  Tele-health  Tele-education  Emergency Communication DEVELOPMENTAL

8 Video + Audio Teaching-End Class Room-2 Class Room-1 Audio TELE EDUCATION EduSat 5 Spot Beams in Ku Band 1 National Beam in Ku Band 1 National Beam in Ext C Band (6 Channels) Video + Audio

9  180 Hospitals 146 Dist/ Rural Hospitals 34 Super Specialty Hospitals Reaching the un-reached Panel of Doctors Video Conferencing Health Specialist Centre Pathology Cardiology Video Conferencing TELE MEDICINE VIA SATELLITE Referral Hospitals

10 CARTOSAT - 1 PAN - 2.5M, 30 KM, F/A RESOURCESAT-1 LISS M; 4 XS LISS M; 3-XS AWIFS - 70 M; 4-XS CARTOSAT-2 PAN - 1M MEGHA-TROPIQUES SAPHIR SCARAB & MADRAS IRS-1C/1D LISS-3 (23/70M, STEERABLE PAN (5.8 M); WiFS (188M) INSAT-2E CCD (1KM RESOLUTION; EVERY 30 MNUTESS) INDIAN IMAGING SYSTEMS IMAGING IMPROVEMENTS  1KM TO 1.0 M RESOLUTION  GLOBAL COVERAGE  APPLICATION-SPECIFIC 1999 IRS-P2 LISS-2 IRS-P3 WiFS MOS X-Ray IRS-P4 OCEANSAT OCM, MSMR IRS-1A/1B LISS-1&2 (72/36M, 4 BANDS; VIS & NIR) BHASKARA RS-D / /

11 EARTH OBSERVATION – APPLICATIONS WATER  Potential Drinking Water Zones  Command Area Management  Reservoir Sedimentation OCEAN  Potential Fishing Zone (PFZ)  Coastal Zone Mapping DISASTER SUPPORT  Flood Damage Assessment  Drought Monitoring  Land Slide Hazard Zonation FOREST, ENVIRONMENT, BIO  Forest Cover & Type Mapping  Forest Fire and Risk Mapping  Biodiversity Characterisation  Environmental Impact Studies AGRICULTURE & SOIL  Crop Acreage & Production Estimation  Soil & Land Degradation Mapping  Watershed Development  Horticulture Mission for North- East LAND  Landuse/Land Cover Mapping  Wasteland Mapping  Urban Sprawl Studies  Large Scale Mapping WEATHER & CLIMATE  Extended Range Monsoon Forecasting  Ocean State Forecasting

12  Development of spatial information system on ground water covering problem states  More than 90% success rate in drilled sources (more than 2,00,000 in 7 states) Ground Water Prospect Map with Sites for Recharge Implementation and Feedback status A milestone application towards building social infrastructure  Wells Drilled Success Rate (%) Kerala  7, KAR  34, AP  35, MP  22, RAJ  67, CHG  34, RAJIV GANDHI NATIONAL DRINKING WATER MISSION

13 PSLVGSLV GSLV MkIII Weight (T) Payload (Kgs)1,500 SSO2,250 GTO4,000 to 4,500 GTO Flights 9 ( )4 ( ) -- ISRO LAUNCHERS

14 November 21, 1963 SLV-3ASLV TODAY, 2007 PSLVGSLV ARYABHATA GSAT KALPANA INSAT-2E INSAT-3B INSAT-3A IRS-1D RESOURCESAT INSAT-3E TES INSAT-3C IRS-P Self reliance in launching Self reliance in building satellites Spacecraft Missions 10 4 LAUNCH VEHICLE SATELLITE APPLICATIONS 22 Launch Vehicle Missions EDUSAT HAMSAT CARTOSAT FOUR DECADES OF INDIAN SPACE PROGRAMME CARTOSAT INSAT-4A

15 SPACE SCIENCE ASTROSAT Chandrayaan-1 India’s First Lunar Mission

16 First Lunar Mission The satellite construction is progressing. The launch is scheduled in 2008

17 Chandrayaan-1 Mission Objectives  High resolution imaging and chemical and mineralogical mapping of lunar surface to define the process leading to the formation and chemical evolution of moon. oRemote sensing in visible, near Infra Red, low energy X-ray and high energy X-ray regions  Systematic topographic mapping of the whole surface of the moon.  Develop expertise of planning and execution of mission for sending S/C to orbit around moon, this exercise will help for future planetary exploration missions.  To establish capability of planetary data analysis, data archival and dissemination.

18 Chandrayaan-1 Mission Spin-offs  Realization of Deep Space Network (DSN)  Establishment of Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC)  With the concept of Announcement Of Opportunity (AO) payloads, many space agencies are participating in Chandrayaan-1  International Co-operation for Space science and Space exploration  Generation of interest among the student Community

19 Chandrayaan-1 Payloads ISRO 1.Terrain Mapping Camera – ( TMC ) 2.Hyper Spectral Imager – ( HySI-VNIR ) 3.Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument – ( LLRI ) 4.High Energy X-ray payload– ( HEX ) 5.Moon IMPACT PROBE with MSM, Video camera and an altimeter – ( MIP ) Other Space Agencies / Research Institutions 1.Low Energy X-ray (CIXS & SXM): RAL,UK 2. Mini SAR(APL/NASA, USA) 3.SIR-2, Max Plank Inst, Germany 4.Sub Kev Atom Reflecting Analyzer– IRF, swedan; JAXA,Japan; ISAS, Switzerland; SPL, India 5.Radiation Dose Monitor (Bulgaria)– ( RADOM ) 6.Moon Mineralogy Mapper (JPL/NASA,USA)– (M 3 )

20 ISRO SPENT AROUND $ 540 M in Billions of $ Source : World Market Prospects for Public Space Programs by Euroconsult 2002 Comparison with other Space Faring Nations (2001) SpaceHealth Care Education Comparison within India 8 cent out of $ 100 GNP Space Agencies Spend world over spend over $23b in a year. Indian Spending : Around 2 Cents in a dollar A fleet of 9 Geostationary Satellites (INSAT- 2E; 3A; 3B; 3C; 3E; Kalpana-1; GSAT-2; Edusat; 4A) A fleet of 8 Remote Sensing Satellites (IRS – 1C; 1D; P3; P4; TES, Resourcesat-1, Cartosat 1&2) Two operational Launchers – PSLV & GSLV End-to-end capability in Remote Sensing & Telecommunication arena A wide spectrum of applications benefiting the society A reasonable success in commercialisation efforts US ESA JAPAN FRANCE ITALY GERMANY INDIA CANADA CHINA BRAZIL AT WHAT COST ? 39% on access to space and 56.4% on bringing down benefits of space to earth

21 Possible Future Missions  Basically four types of future missions are being envisaged. (These missions are a result of a thought process within the Indian Scientific community and are not Govt. approved ISRO projects yet)  Follow on mission to Moon: Considered time frame (Chandrayaan-2)  Asteroid / Comet flyby mission: Possible time frame  Mission to Mars :Timeframe  Human Mission : Timeframe 2020  Missions to other planets (Venus, Mercury…Vision beyond 2020)

22 Chandrayaan - 2 Mission includes Orbiter and Lander Remote Sensing instruments Lander might include robotics, rovers and penetrators. Preferred landing sites, specific scientific problems and instruments need to be finalized. Far side of the moon, particularly South Pole Aitkin (SPA) basin is a prime candidate. Considered time frame : 2011 Possible instruments on the orbiter: –Terrain mapping camera – nm hyper spectral Imager –Low energy X-ray spectrometer (CCD-array) –Gamma ray, neutron, alpha spectrometer

23 Mission to Asteroid Orbiter mission to a main belt Asteroid / Comet OR Orbiter mission around a suitable to near earth asteroid coupled with flyby to one or more comets / asteroids Possible time frame : 2015

24 Scientific objectives  Understanding Evolution of Asteroids  Shape, Size, Mass and Composition of Asteroids  Asteroids (e.g. Vesta and Ceres) as parent bodies of meteorites (differentiated and stony type)  Role of water/ice in controlling asteroid evolution  Thermal history, differentiation and core size Asteroid Mission: Science Goals & Mission Priorities Understanding the very early processes operating in Planetesimals and hence in Planets

25 Comet mission configuration to be based on the outcome of other such missions  Surface and Interior of Comet Nucleus  Composition of dust and gas in the coma  Details of thermal balance and outflow (sublimation of Ice)  Solar radiations & solar wind interaction  Samples of Comet Dust for Laboratory Studies COMA SUN NUCLEUS ION TAIL DUST TAIL COMET ORBIT Hydrogen Envelope Target: Comet

26 Mission to Mars Orbiter mission to Mars to study Mars atmosphere, weather and solar wind-Mars interactions. Instruments to be developed are for studying weak magnetic field and plasma Timeframe : 2019

27 Thank You


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