Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Art Appreciation October 4, 2010: Photography (Chapter 9)

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Art Appreciation October 4, 2010: Photography (Chapter 9)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Art Appreciation October 4, 2010: Photography (Chapter 9)

2 Timothy H. O’Sullivan, Ancient Ruins in the Canyon de Chelle (1873)

3 Paul Martin, Entrance to Victoria Park (1893)

4 Lewis Hine, Breaker Boys Working in Ewen Breaker of Pennsylvania Coal Co. (1911)

5 Hermann Krone, Still Life of the Washerwoman (1853)

6 Photography and the traditional arts

7 “Original” and “copy”

8 Photography and the traditional arts “Original” and “copy” Photography as the “democratic” art form

9 Photography and the traditional arts “Original” and “copy” Photography as the “democratic” art form Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth

10

11 Photography and the traditional arts “Original” and “copy” Photography as the “democratic” art form Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth

12 Photography and the traditional arts “Original” and “copy” Photography as the “democratic” art form Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth aesthetic form or document of life?

13

14 Photography and the traditional arts “Original” and “copy” Photography as the “democratic” art form Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth aesthetic form or document of life?

15 The camera obscura

16

17 The first photograph – Niepce (1825)

18 Louis Daguerre

19 Invented the daguerreotype process with Niepce

20 Louis Daguerre Invented the daguerreotype process with Niepce Image formed through mercury and silver compound to produce an image on a silver plate

21

22

23 Problems with the Daguerreotype There was no negative; only originals Left-right reversal Expensive silver plates Very fragile Highly poisonous bromine & mercury vapors

24 Daguerre’s Le boulevard du temple (1838)

25 Problems with the Daguerreotype There was no negative; only originals Left-right reversal Expensive silver plates Very fragile Highly poisonous bromine & mercury vapors Long exposure times

26 The Calotype Process

27 Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841

28 The Calotype Process Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light

29 The Calotype Process Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made

30 The Calotype Process Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made Paper lessened the detail of the picture

31 The Calotype Process Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 Photography on paper, with ½ hour exposure time Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made Paper lessened the detail of the picture

32 The Collodion process

33 Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851

34 The Collodion process Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 Replace the calotype’s paper with glass

35 The Collodion process Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 Replace the calotype’s paper with glass Creates a more detailed, stable negative

36 The Collodion process Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 Replace the calotype’s paper with glass Creates a more detailed, stable negative Allows the artist to make an unlimited number of prints from a single negative

37 Louis Pierson, Countess Castiglione (1860)

38 The Collodion process tails?cat=2&segid=1726&segnr=1

39 Early experiments in photographic portraiture: daguerreotype (1843)

40 A tripod The rigid posture and expressions of the sitter Timing of the exposure Two prints required two sittings

41 Early experiments in photographic portraiture: calotype

42 David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, Free Church of Scotland, 1843 (oil painting)

43 Capt. Robert-Barclay Allardyce (Hill/Adamson)

44 Hill/Adamson, The Misses Binny and Miss Monro (1845)

45 Relative to painting, the calotype showed “the imperfect work of man … and not the perfect work of God.”

46 Collodion’s impact on Portraiture

47 Made commercial portraiture possible on a large scale

48 Collodion’s impact on Portraiture Made commercial portraiture possible on a large scale Ease of reproducing prints and better quality of prints

49

50 Photography & Portraiture

51 Since Renaissance, portraits associated with ‘inner character’

52 Photography & Portraiture Since Renaissance, portraits associated with ‘inner character’ Neither Daguerre’s or Talbot’s process suitable to portraiture: 15 minutes or more of stillness in sunshine

53 Photography & Portraiture Since Renaissance, portraits associated with ‘inner character’ Neither Daguerre’s or Talbot’s process suitable to portraiture: 15 minutes or more of stillness in sunshine The development of collodion that makes portraiture commercially viable and popular

54 Debates over photography

55 Baudelaire: Photography is “the refuge of failed painters with too little talent”

56 Debates over photography Baudelaire: Photography is “the refuge of failed painters with too little talent” In the decades following its discovery, a search for ways to fit a mechanical medium into traditional ideas of art

57 Debates over photography Baudelaire: Photography is “the refuge of failed painters with too little talent” In the decades following its discovery, a search for ways to fit a mechanical medium into traditional ideas of art

58 In this debate, three main positions emerged: 1. Photographs were too ‘mechanical’ to be art

59 Charles Blanc: “Photography copies everything and explains nothing, it is blind to the realm of the spirit.” Lady Eastlake: Claimed that art was about “Truth, Reality, Beauty,” and that the camera image could fulfill the first two of these, but never the third

60 In this debate, three main positions emerged: 1. Photographs were too ‘mechanical’ to be art 2. Photographs would be useful to art but should not be considered equal in creativeness to drawing and painting

61 In this debate, three main positions emerged: 1. Photographs were too ‘mechanical’ to be art 2. Photographs would be useful to art but should not be considered equal in creativeness to drawing and painting 3. Camera images could be significant as handmade works of art

62 “The lens is an instrument like the pencil and the brush, and photography is a process like engraving and drawing, for what makes an artist is not the process but the feeling.”

63 Julia Margaret Cameron, Annie (1864)

64 -Pioneered the use of close-ups

65 Julia Margaret Cameron, Annie (1864) -Pioneered the use of close-ups -Soft focus

66 Julia Margaret Cameron, Annie (1864) -Pioneered the use of close-ups -Soft focus -used lighting to enhance the images of her subjects

67 Julia Margaret Cameron, Annie (1864) -Pioneered the use of close-ups -Soft focus -used lighting to enhance the images of her subjects -raking light

68

69 The impact of photography on the traditional arts

70 Artists begin to incorporate ‘camera vision’ into the traditional arts

71 The impact of photography on the traditional arts Healy, Church, and McEntee: The Arch of Titus (1871; oil on canvas)

72 The impact of photography on the traditional arts Gustave Courbet, A Burial at Ornans ( )

73

74 Humbert de Molard, The Hunters (1851) Charles Negre, Young Girl Seated with Basket, (1852)

75

76 Charles Philippe Auguste Carey, Still Life with Waterfowl, 1873 Hermann Krone, Still Life of the Washerwoman (1853)

77 Photography

78 Reveals the photographer’s personal way of seeing and responding to the world

79 Photography Reveals the photographer’s personal way of seeing and responding to the world Photography means “light-writing”

80 Photography Reveals the photographer’s personal way of seeing and responding to the world Photography means “light-writing” usually associated with family history, journalism, advertising, public relations

81 Photography Reveals the photographer’s personal way of seeing and responding to the world Photography means “light-writing” usually associated with family history, journalism, advertising, public relations An artistic means of expression

82 Photography as Art The artist’s choices:

83 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject

84 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light

85 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light – Angle

86 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light – Angle – Focus

87 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light – Angle – Focus – Distance

88 Photography as Art The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light – Angle – Focus – Distance – Composition

89 Ansel Adams

90 Adams, Moonrise (1975) The artist’s choices: – Subject – Light – Angle – Focus – Distance – Composition


Download ppt "Art Appreciation October 4, 2010: Photography (Chapter 9)"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google