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BIO/BCH/MI/PLS/PPA 601 Special Topics in Molecular and Cellular Genetics Brian Rymond, Biology, 335 T.H. Morgan (THM) Biology Bldg., 257-5530

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Presentation on theme: "BIO/BCH/MI/PLS/PPA 601 Special Topics in Molecular and Cellular Genetics Brian Rymond, Biology, 335 T.H. Morgan (THM) Biology Bldg., 257-5530"— Presentation transcript:

1 BIO/BCH/MI/PLS/PPA 601 Special Topics in Molecular and Cellular Genetics Brian Rymond, Biology, 335 T.H. Morgan (THM) Biology Bldg., Seth DeBolt, Dept. of Horticulture, N324 Ag. Sci. Center North, ,

2 Description: For more than 25 years, distinguished scientists have visited the UK campus each Spring semester to deliver lectures and participate in informal discussions with graduate students as part of the Special Topics in Molecular and Cellular Genetics Course. Emphasis is placed on the selection of established investigators of international stature who present exciting new research in the areas of molecular and cellular genetics. This one credit course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. This course is cross-listed as BCH/BIO/MI/PLS/PPA 601. Class meeting times: This seminar enrichment program for graduate and advanced undergraduate students meets at irregular times. The course will host 4 guest speakers in Each speaker will provide an introductory lecture to the enrolled students plus deliver a scientific seminar open to the entire UK Life Science Community. The lectures are scheduled for Monday mornings and the seminars presented on Monday afternoons. In addition, the 601 class participants will meet with the speakers for an informal lunch on the Monday of the visit and also participate in a 30 minute question and answer period immediately following each seminar. In order for us to derive the greatest value from these eminent scientists, the 601 class will assemble the Friday before a scheduled visit for a pre-meeting of student-lead presentations and discussion of select publications from invited speaker’s research area and program. The publications relevant for each pre-meeting will be posted at least two weeks prior to each visit. Every enrolled student will provide each presenter with one question concerning his/her paper by noon on the Wednesday preceding the pre- meeting. The course coordinators will advise the student teams in preparing materials prior to these presentations.

3 Requirements and Grading: A student-run pre-meeting will be held approximately one week in advance of each scientist’s visit to familiarize the class with the system, techniques, and topics to be discussed by the invited speaker. Selected research papers will be assigned as required reading for all students before each pre-meeting and these will posted on the class webpage. Pre-meetings will typically entail three or four student presentations based on the assigned readings. All enrolled students are expected to attend the scheduled pre- meetings, lectures, and seminars (including the post-seminar question and answer period). In addition, each student must attend at least two of the student/speaker lunchtime meetings. Attendance will be taken at each event. Students are expected to be prepare and participate (that is, ask questions) in each event. The times/dates of the pre-meetings, lectures, and seminars were selected to maximize student involvement. Information on the speakers visits will be posted on the class website during the semester, consequently, each student should check the class site at least once each week. Grades will be assigned based on the level of student participation. Unexcused absence from two scheduled events will decrease your final grade by one letter, three absences by two letter grades. More than three unexcused absences will result in a grade of E.

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5 Harry Klee, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Horticultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Topic: Defining chemical and genetic factors contributing to "flavor" in fruits and vegetables. Pre-meeting March 27, 2015 (Friday), 4:00-5:30 PM, Cameron Williams Lecture Hall (CWLH; Plant Sciences Building) Student Lecture March 30, 2015 (Monday), 8:00-8:50 AM, CWLH Student Lunch March 30, 2015 (Monday), 12:30-1:30 PM, Room 460 Plant Sciences Building Seminar March 30, 2015 (Monday) 4:00 PM, CWLH Title: TBA Host: Seth DeBolt, The Chemistry of Preference The taste of a tomato is the consequence of the interactions of sugars, acids and a set of volatile compounds. These volatiles are derived from a diverse set of precursors, including amino acids, fatty acids and carotenoids. We are trying to understand how all of these chemicals are integrated into the unique flavor favored in this commercial crop.

6 Jeffrey Harper, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Nevada, Reno. harper#Biographyhttp://www.unr.edu/molecular-biosciences/faculty/jeff- harper#Biography Topic: Gene expression and calcium signaling adaptations to stress in plants Pre-meeting April 3, 2015 (Friday), 4:00-5:30 PM, Cameron Williams Lecture Hall (CWLH; Plant Sciences Building) Student Lecture April 6, 2015 (Monday), 8:00-8:50 AM, CWLH Student Lunch April 6, 2015 (Monday), 12:30-1:30 PM, Room 460 Plant Sciences Building Seminar April 6, 2015 (Monday) 4:00 PM, CWLH Title: TBA Host: Seth DeBolt, The Harper lab is interested in how a plant can use as few as 28,000 genes to develop and survive under extreme environmental conditions, such as cold, heat, drought and salt stress. A primary focus is on calcium signaling. The lab employs genetic, cell, bioinformatic, and biochemical approaches, using Arabidopsis and yeast as model systems. Specific aims are focused on questions of enzyme structure and function for members of the following three gene families: Calcium Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs) Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Channels (CNGCs) P-type ATPase Ion Pumps.

7 Barry Ganetzky, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Genetics and Medical Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Topic: Genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic growth, maintenance, and repair in Drosophila melanogaster Pre-meeting April 10, 2015 (Friday), 4:00-5:30 PM 109 TH Morgan Building Student Lecture April 13, 2015 (Monday), 8:00-8:50 AM, 109 TH Morgan Building Student Lunch April 13, 2015 (Monday), 12:30-1:30 PM, 305 TH Morgan Building Seminar April 13, 2015 (Monday), 4:00 PM, 116 TH Morgan Building Title: TBA Host: Brian Rymond, For more than 30 years, Barry Ganetzky has scrutinized mutant fruit flies that shake, shimmy, and pass out if overheated, in his search for the genes that underlie this unusual appearance and behavior. This approach has served him well, leading him to discover numerous genes involved in development and neural function and earning him election to the National Academy of Sciences in He is now using the same strategy to investigate the molecular mechanisms that regulate synaptic growth and plasticity “I never met a mutant I didn't like,”

8 Nathaniel Heintz, Ph.D., Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, James and Marilyn Simons Professor, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Rockefeller University Topic: Development and dysfunction of the mammalian cerebellum Pre-meeting* April 17, 2015 (Friday), 4:00-5:30 PM 109 TH Morgan Building Student Lecture* April 20, 2015 (Monday), 8:00-8:50 AM, 109 TH Morgan Building Student Lunch* April 20, 2015 (Monday), 12:30-1:30 PM, 305 TH Morgan Building Seminar* April 20, 2015 (Monday), 4:00 PM, 116 TH Morgan Building Title: TBA Host: Brian Rymond, *Tentative dates, backup dates for Dr. Heintz are April 24 (pre-meeting), April 27 (lecture, lunch, seminar) at the same times and locations. Research in Dr. Heintz’s laboratory aims to identify the genes, circuits, cells, macromolecular assemblies and individual molecules that contribute to the function and dysfunction of the mammalian brain. Genetic dissection of central nervous system (CNS) cell types and circuits. Translational profiling of CNS cell types in health and disease. Epigenetic regulation of the neuronal genome: the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Biochemical mechanisms of neuronal function.

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10 READING LIST FOR KLEE: Klee & Tieman, Genetic challenges of flavor improvement in tomato, 2013, Trends in Genetics 29: Review Gloulet et. al., Role of an esterase in flavor volatile variation within the tomato clade. 2012, PNAS 109: Tieman et al., The chemical interactions undelying tomator flavor preferences Current Biology 22: Tieman et al., 2012 – Current Biology supplementary material Tieman et al., Identification of loci affecting volitile emissions in tomato fruits J. Exp. Botany 57:

11 Before each pre-meeting, every enrolled student will provide each presenter with one question concerning his/her paper by noon on the Wednesday preceding the pre-meeting. Submission of these questions will be used as one measure of class participation. The speakers will use these questions as a guide in developing the pre-meeting presentation. The speakers will also come prepared to ask the audience questions about the content or implications of the research presented in the paper.

12 Student Presenter: Two examples of what was done very well in this presentation: The area where improvement will be most beneficial: Class Feedback for Pre-meeting Presentations


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