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Hosted by the West Allis/West Milwaukee School District.

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Presentation on theme: "Hosted by the West Allis/West Milwaukee School District."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hosted by the West Allis/West Milwaukee School District

2  Introductions  Walk over to the Learning Center – tour, meet staff and students – PBIS implementation  DATA, DATA, DATA  Review of PBIS Apps  DEWS update  Why We Teach Behavior and Acknowledgements at the High Schoool  Networking  Announcements

3  Announcements: School of Recogntion Applications  Learning Center Tour  Data Walk Through (West Allis presentation)  PBIS Apps  Networking 11 – Noon: External Coach Session

4  Applications will be available beginning of March  Due end of April

5  Answer the question.  Provide documents and data when asked  Complete the BOQ by end of March

6  Principal and Coach leadership/attendance at meetings  Use of ODR data for problem-solving  Demonstration of the impact of data decision making process  Process for teaching new staff and students PBIS process  Matching supports with student needs

7  Classroom Management – All classes: ◦ Classroom Matrix ◦ Teaching classroom procedures ◦ Classroom Acknowledgement System ◦ Classroom Consequence System  Family Engagement ◦ Several venues used to communicate with families ◦ Survey ◦ Teaching ◦ Parent rep on Tier 1 team  Culturally Responsive Practice ◦ Problem solving from disaggregated data ◦ Reviewing teaching practices ◦ PD for staff  Integrated Academic and Behavior Systems ◦ Integrated use of data and same problem solving process

8  Learningcenter.wawm.k12.wi.us  Brief Description  Tour of school  Implementing PBIS

9 D. Stanley and B. Linzmeier Feburary 13, 2015

10  How does your High School collect data?  What works well?  What needs to be fixed?

11  Schools PBIS trained during and school year  Used district’s current data system to track behaviors (not SWIS)  We did okay tracking data, however…..

12  Took two hours or more to pull usable data  Could not pull all the needed data (Think the Big 5 x 2)  No way to track minor behaviors

13  District sent two people to be trained as SWIS facilitators in Fall of 2012  All 17 schools in district trained in SWIS is Fall of 2012 – using to track Majors and minors  Schools using SWIS-CICO by end of school year

14  Schools have access to all of this great data… What do they do with it?

15  Data Walk ◦ Staff spent an afternoon analyzing their behavior data for 1 st semester ◦ The Big 5 plus ethnicity and Spec Ed behavior reports were reviewed by the staff ◦ Staff looked at data and answered three questions and recorded responses on a Google Form

16  Here What – stated what the data showed ◦ We have 37 referrals for skipping 6 th period  So What – why that data point was important ◦ Students are missing instruction during that class period. Our attendance is poor during this period ◦ Staff was able to state their “wonderings” about the data as well  Now What – possible next steps to address data point ◦ Provide extra “incentives” to attend 6 th period- Possible required or desired class for students

17  Created staff buy-in around behaviors – saw what was happening in the building  Created discussion around “common language” and common definitions of behaviors  PBIS team was able to introduce new systems to address staff concerns – including a new matrix and acknowledgement system

18  Data analyzed on weekly basis – high flyers are scheduled for a “Friday Meeting” (staff only)  Staff meets to discuss student. Brief background on student and summary behaviors given  Staff discussed what works and what doesn’t work for student  Student plan discussed and implemented – shared with all staff

19  If student continues to receive high number of referrals – the staff will “revisit”  If students behaviors are “too intensive” students is referred to admin behavior team

20  Students with high number of referrals were able to choose a teacher of their choice to meet with 2-3 times per week  Meetings are meant to be positive in nature and brief  Focus on building positive relationships with students

21  How does your High School collect data?  What works well?  What needs to be fixed?

22  School codes no longer work  Coordinators must set up school users ◦ Team member – can enter BOQ and TIC data ◦ Reader – can down load reports  SAS is done by sending a link to all school staff

23  Decide who will be entering Implementation scores ◦ Limit this to 1 or 2 people, including Tier 2  Decide who to give access to reports ◦ Outside External Coach? ◦ Principal? ◦ Other team members? ◦ https://www.pbisapps.org/ https://www.pbisapps.org/

24  DPI released new DEWS resources ◦ DEWS Action Guide – very helpful for schools to use DEWS as an integral part of an integrated universal screening process Dropout Reduction Strategies – research-based, looking at behavior, mental health and academics Accessing DEWS Rosters - print out and YouTube video

25 Teaching Behavioral Expectations for Academic and Social Competence shows that we CARE.

26  Bulach's (1998)' Deiro's (1996), and Nodding's (1992) research on caring demonstrates that when students perceive their teachers as caring, their grades and behavior are positively influenced.  Miller’s research results show the influence of teacher caring on students‘ grades and behavior. ◦ Teachers implementing high levels of anxiety- reducing behaviors show statistical significance with student academic grades. Source: Richard M. Miller (2008)

27 “Caring is not a program or strategy, but rather a way of relating to students, their families, and each other that conveys compassion, understanding, respect, and interest.” (Noddings, 1988) Source: Richard M. Miller (2008)

28  Reducing Anxiety ◦ Calling students by name and greeting them as they enter the room  Listening and Being a Friend ◦ meet their needs of belonging  Rewarding Good Behavior and Appropriate Use of Criticism ◦ meet students' needs for self-esteem, which allows a student to focus on self-actualization needs so learning can occur Source: Richard M. Miller (2008)

29 Deiro (1996) expressed six strategies to develop a nurturing and caring environment: 1. Create one-on-one time with their students 2. Maximize individual and small group activities 3. Intersperse personal and academic talk 4. Conduct personal conversations during non- class time 5. Write comments on students' papers 6. Use nonverbal communication such as eye contact or a pat on the back Source: Richard M. Miller (2008)

30 “The teacher's power is based upon the student's admiration and respect for the teacher.” (Deiro, 1996)

31 High Schools are different, but…..

32 Steps needed to teach students expected behaviors: 1. Develop school-wide expectations 2. Define expectations across all school settings 3. Teach expectations to all students 4. Provide modeling of expected behaviors 5. Provide examples and non-examples of expected behavior 6. Provide opportunities for students to practice/use expected behaviors 7. Pre-correct students for expected behaviors 8. Acknowledge students for exhibiting expected behaviors Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

33 Top Three High School Implementation Challenges:  Administrator buy-in  Teacher buy-in  Consistency amongst teachers and staff in teaching behavioral expectations Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

34 Development of Expectations and Training  Establish linkage with elementary and middle schools – start teaching early  Use student leaders to develop strategies for teaching expectations  Survey students for suggestions and concerns  Establish committee of parents, students, staff, and administration  Clearly define expectations – tardiness Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

35 Formal Instructional Strategies  Use TV and intercom for teaching  Use video of staff and students  Use pre-correction to teach in context  Use creative roll-out procedures such as videotapes, popular movies, role-playing  Provide formal lesson plans  Provide flip chart notebook to teachers and substitute teacher with structure of lesson  Have teachers check-off that they taught certain expectations each month Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

36 Informal Instructional Strategies  Teachers act as role model  Utilize teachable moments.  Posters of expectations in established areas Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

37  Design activities to promote teaching of behavioral expectations ◦ Direct training of teachers via in-service and lesson plans, ◦ Reward teachers during a weekly drawing for teaching expectations ◦ Have teachers use a “check-off sheet” to monitor whether or not they have taught all of the behavioral expectations  Designate times to teach behavioral expectations ◦ Advisory period  It was suggested that the advisory period occur during the bell schedule  Limited to15-20 students ◦ Students orientations  include sessions delivered by the guidance department Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

38  How do you acknowledge students and staff?  How do you keep it fresh!  Resources  Networking

39  Last general Networking Sessions ◦ March 17 th – CESA 1 ◦ March 18 th – Cudahy HS  New PBIS TAC!  Recognition Applications ◦ Early March through the end of April ◦ Review and assistance provided at Networking session


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