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Data Lifecycles & Management Plans. Data Lifecycles and Management Plans A bit of Theory Data lifecycle models and what they’re good for. Some jargon.

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Presentation on theme: "Data Lifecycles & Management Plans. Data Lifecycles and Management Plans A bit of Theory Data lifecycle models and what they’re good for. Some jargon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Data Lifecycles & Management Plans

2 Data Lifecycles and Management Plans A bit of Theory Data lifecycle models and what they’re good for. Some jargon and definitions. From lifecycles to management plans. Group exercise –Drafting a Data Management Plan mins

3 Data Lifecycle Project Planning Data Collection Data Analysis Data Distribution / Archiving Data Discovery / Re-use Data Re-analysis

4 because good research needs good data Digital Data Curation Centre Lifecycle Model

5 Digital Data Capture Data that are derived from a physical data object, e.g. inputted measurement of artefacts, scans of drawings, Digital Data Creation Data that are ‘Born Digital’ and not derived from a physical data object, e.g. digital photographs, geophysical survey data, some analysis readouts, etc. Documentation Explains how data were created or digitised, what the data mean, what their content and structure are, and any manipulations that may have taken place. Metadata “Data about Data” Standardised structured information explaining the purpose, origin, time references, geographic location, creator, access conditions and terms of use of a data collection. Data storage / Back-up System used for looking after digital data during the life of a project. Back-up is NOT preservation. Ingest Process by which digital data are archived by a digital depository. Digital Preservation Long term archiving of digital data so that it will be accessible in the future. Long Term Period over which changing technologies, formats, media impact upon the access to and use of digital resources. Migration Transfer of digital resources from one hardware/media and software/file format generation to the next. Emulation Techniques for imitating obsolete computer systems to retrieve digital data. (You might hear computer people talk about this, but it is unlikely you will need to worry about it). Some Jargon and Definitions

6 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use 1.What data will I produce? 2.How will I organise the data? 3.Is my data management working well? What data will I keep? 4. What data will be deposited and where? 5. Who will be interested in re-using the data? Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans

7 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use 1.What data will I produce? Text documents Artefact analyses Sample analyses Survey data Drawings Photographs Recorded interviews Etc.. Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans

8 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use 2. How will I look after my data? File structure File naming What file formats will I use? Which software will I use? Roughly how many files? How will I describe and document my data? Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans

9 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use 3.Evaluating data management: Is the file structure / naming understandable to others? Are further data required? Are new data types required? Which data will be kept? Which data can be discarded? Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans

10 4. What data will be deposited and where? Define the core data set of the project Which data will be included in the thesis? Which data are supplementary? Will I produce an E-Thesis? Where will I deposit my E-Thesis? Will I deposit supplementary data? Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use

11 5. Preservation and Re-Use Who will be interested in re-using the data? Is there sufficient information to allow easy re-use of the data? Data Lifecycles & Data Management Plans 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Deposit PhD & Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use The best way to help preserve data is to plan for its re-use (Archaeology Data Service) […in 10, 50, 100 or even 500 years time…]

12 1. Create 2. Active Use 3. Selection & Evaluation 4. Publish & Deposit Data 5. Preservation & Re-Use Who owns the original data? Are the data covered by Intellectual Property Rights? Are there sensitive archaeological data in the project? Are there personal data as part of the project archive? Will I have authority to archive these data? How do I get permission to archive these data? Back to the Future… 1. Create

13 Exercise 2: Drafting a Data Management Plan ….in reverse order What do you want / have to do with your research data after completing your PhD? Are any of the data sensitive? Who ‘owns’ your research data and will you have authority to archive it? Describe any copyrighted material you plan to include in your thesis, e.g. images. Will you be working with any unusual or large file formats? Describe the core data set of you research.

14 Cambridge University Library Open Access Post-Graduate Teaching Materials for Research Data Management in Archaeology Created by Lindsay Lloyd-Smith (2011) Module 2 Data Lifecycles and Management Plans Acknowledgements This material was created by the JISC-funded DataTrain Project based at the Cambridge University Library. Project Manager: Elin Stangeland (Cambridge University Library) Project advisors: Stuart Jeffrey (Archaeology Data Service), Sian Lazar (Department of Anthropology, Cambridge University), Irene Peano (DataTrain Project Officer – Social Anthropology), Cameron Petrie (Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University), Grant Young (Cambridge University Library), and Anna Collins Research Data and Digital Curation Officer). Image credits: Slide 3 images from left to right: The Haddon Library courtesy of Cameron Petrie, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University. Surveying at Charsadda Pakistan, courtesy of Cameron Petrie, Department of Archaeology, Cambridge University. John Krigbaum recording human skeletal remains from Niah Cave, Sarawak. Photograph: L. Lloyd-Smith. Archives des députés allemands: Harrisson Excavation Archive field notebook, image courtesy of the Sarawak Museum Rob Law printing out PhD Thesis. Photograph: L. Lloyd-Smith Slide 4: DCC Data Lifecycle and image of Checklist for a Data Management Plan courtesy of the Digital Curation Centre Creative Commons Licence The teaching materials are released under Creative Commons licence UK CC BY-NC-SA 2.0: By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share- Alike. You are free to re-use, adapt, and build-upon the work for educational purposes. The material may not be used for commercial purposes outside of education. If the material is modified and further distributed it must be released under a similar CC licence.


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