Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The future of Renewables in Victoria Wind Energy Victorian Planning and Environment Law Association 30 April 2012 Phil Burn, Project Development and Planning.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The future of Renewables in Victoria Wind Energy Victorian Planning and Environment Law Association 30 April 2012 Phil Burn, Project Development and Planning."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 The future of Renewables in Victoria Wind Energy Victorian Planning and Environment Law Association 30 April 2012 Phil Burn, Project Development and Planning WestWind Energy

3 Wind energy is the safest and cleanest of all forms of electricity generation with regard to its manufacture and ongoing operation...

4 Generating electricity – Wind

5 State of Play - World

6 State of Play – Australia StateInstalled Cap (MW)JobsCap investment SA $2.7b VIC428300$983m WA204143$923m NSW187131$467m TAS14299$424m QLD128$20m Total $5.5b

7 Planning Policy VC 78 New noise standard – New Zealand 2010 Removed the call in provision for projects over 30MW Onerous transitional arrangements affecting approved projects.

8 Planning Policy VC 82 Banned from the Yarra Valley and Dandenong Ranges, Mornington Peninsula, Bellarine Peninsula, Macedon and McHarg Ranges, Bass Coast and the Great Ocean Road region as well 5km from specified towns. Unless integrated with another development. Prescriptive 2km setback (unless written consent) between existing dwellings and wind turbines.

9 Victoria’s Wind Resources

10 Banned Areas

11

12 Planning Policy 2km setback ( ) does not consider: number and the location of turbines prevailing wind direction topography power rating or size of the turbine make and model of wind turbines and the rated sound power output.

13 Planning Policy 2km setbacks Aluminium by electrolysis Petroleum refinery Wind turbine

14 Opinions

15 81% of respondents would support a wind farm within 10km of their residence and 68% would support a wind farm within 1km of their residence. Strong support for the development of wind farms than might be otherwise assumed from media coverage.

16 Why care? Development Costly to develop wind energy projects Consultants / legal fees Site investigation fees Construction Tower construction opportunities Rolling construction labour force Local multipliers Operation Additional non-rainfall dependent farm income Significant municipal charges Operational / maintenance.

17 The Future Australia needs to reach 41,000 GWh to meet LRET (2020). Mostly from wind – industry estimates approx 8 GW or 3200 x 2.5 MW wind turbines. Rooftop solar (PV and hot water) has created a REC surplus - REC demand should be addressed by 2015 / Victoria has approximately 3000 MW approved awaiting construction. Some projects will expire as investment will focus on the most efficient and cost effective wind projects.

18 Conclusion We need to acknowledge that cheap and efficient electricity generation must be located in areas of natural advantage. Wind is no exception. Impacts associated with land use change can be managed and performance standards can be applied. Wind is no exception. Areas of landscape, amenity and tourism significance can be measured and assessed, without the need for draconian planning controls.

19 Conclusion Victoria’s land use planning system should allow the national LRET to be met at the lowest cost. An excellent opportunity exists for Victoria to participate in electricity diversification and employment creation and investment in Victoria’s regions. This opportunity should be embraced, encouraged and managed – not wasted.

20 Thankyou

21 Refs. World Health Organisation Europe Fourth Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health Budapest, Hungary, 23–25 June 2004 Energy, sustainable development and health. Background Document. Wind Turbine Photo Courtesy of Vestas World Health Organisation Europe Fourth Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health Budapest, Hungary, 23–25 June 2004 Energy, sustainable development and health. Background Document. Victorian Wind Atlas 2003, SEAV

22 Refs Pacific Hydro 2011 Community Polling Results, Attitudes to wind energy in Victoria, NSW and South Australia. ERM (2008) Lal Lal Wind Farm – Landscape and Visual Assessment Report. CSIRO (2012) Acceptance of rural wind farms in Australia: a snapshot.


Download ppt "The future of Renewables in Victoria Wind Energy Victorian Planning and Environment Law Association 30 April 2012 Phil Burn, Project Development and Planning."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google