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UNIT 8: THE AMERICAN DREAM Lesson 8.4: Perceptions of the American Dream in Times of Prosperity and Crisis.

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Presentation on theme: "UNIT 8: THE AMERICAN DREAM Lesson 8.4: Perceptions of the American Dream in Times of Prosperity and Crisis."— Presentation transcript:

1 UNIT 8: THE AMERICAN DREAM Lesson 8.4: Perceptions of the American Dream in Times of Prosperity and Crisis

2 Setting the Stage  In this lesson, we will analyze multiple perceptions of the “American Dream” in times of prosperity and crisis through Reconstruction

3 Warm up  What does the word “perception” mean?  How might your perception of the “American Dream” differ from one person to another?

4 Hamilton’s Financial Plan  Go to  And answer the following questions:  1) what was a major problems facing the first federal government?  2) what bold proposal did Hamilton issue in regard to debt, and why did he propose this?  3) Why did Hamilton believe a central bank was important?  4) How did Hamilton propose to make American manufacturers more self-sufficient?  5) Why were Hamilton’s politics so controversial?

5 Embargo of 1807  The Embargo Act of 1807 was a general embargo enacted by the United States Congress against Great Britain and France during the Napoleonic Wars.  The embargo was imposed in response to violations of US. neutrality., in which American merchantmen and their cargo were seized as contraband of war by the belligerent European navies. The British Royal Navy, in particular, resorted to impressment, forcing thousands of American seamen into service on their warships. Great Britain and France, engaged in a struggle for control of Europe, rationalized the plunder of U.S. shipping as incidental to war and necessary for their survival. Americans saw the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair as a particularly egregious example of a British violation of American neutrality. Perceived diplomatic insults and unwarranted official orders issued in support of these actions by European powers were widely recognized as grounds for a U.S. declaration of war. Irate citizens cynically transposed the letters of “Embargo” to read “O Grab Me.”  ACTIVITY: Breakdown the political cartoon on The Embargo Act of 1807

6 Embargo Act of 1807  President Thomas Jefferson acted with restraint as these antagonisms mounted, weighing public support for retaliation. He recommended that Congress respond with commercial warfare, rather than with military mobilization. The Embargo Act was signed into law on December 22, The anticipated effect of this drastic measure – economic hardship for the belligerent nations – was expected to chasten Great Britain and France, and force them to end their molestation of American shipping, respect U.S. neutrality, and cease the policy of impressment. The embargo turned out to be impractical as a coercive measure, and was a failure both diplomatically and economically. As implemented, the legislation inflicted devastating burdens on the U.S. economy and the American people.

7 Radical Reconstruction  Go to the following website:  Answer the following question:  What did radical Republicans believe blacks were entitled too after the Civil War?  How did radical Republicans respond to the tradition suspicion of a strong federal government interfering with the affairs of state?  What did Radicals hope the Civil Rights Act would lead too?  What choice did the 14 th Amendment offer the South?  How did the Reconstruction Act of 1867 divide the south?

8 Reflection  In your journal, how does Hamilton’s Economic Plan, the Embargo Act of 1807, and Radical Reconstruction reflect differing perceptions in regard to the American Dream?


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