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©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers 1803-1818 CREATED EQUAL JONES  WOOD  MAY  BORSTELMANN  RUIZ CHAPTER 10 Defending and.

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Presentation on theme: "©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers 1803-1818 CREATED EQUAL JONES  WOOD  MAY  BORSTELMANN  RUIZ CHAPTER 10 Defending and."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers 1803-1818 CREATED EQUAL JONES  WOOD  MAY  BORSTELMANN  RUIZ CHAPTER 10 Defending and Expanding the New Nation

2 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers “All red men [must] unite in claiming a common and equal right in the land, as it was at first, and should be yet; for it never was divided, but belongs to all, for the use of each.” Tecumseh

3 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers TIMELINE 1803British impressment of Americans 1804Jefferson reelected 1806Non-Importation Act 1807Embargo Act 1808 James Madison elected President 1809Tecumseh’s confederacy established 1812Madison reelected West Florida annexed War declared against England 1813Battle of the Thames 1814Treaty of Ghent Battle of Horseshoe Bend 1815Battle of New Orleans 1816James Monroe elected President Second Bank of the United States chartered

4 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers DEFENDING AND EXPANDING THE NEW NATION Overview HThe British Menace HThe War of 1812 HThe “Era of Good Feelings”? HThe Rise of the Cotton Plantation Economy

5 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers THE BRITISH MENACE HThe Embargo of 1807 HOn the Brink of War

6 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers The Embargo of 1807 HIn response to continued British seizing of American ships and impressment of American sailors H1807: Chesapeake off of Virginia Coast HJefferson’s goal with the embargo was to force England to respect American independence. HUnanticipated results were the promotion of industrialization in U.S. HStates relied on locally produced items

7 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers On the Brink of War H1809: James Madison President HNon-Intercourse Act eased ban on European goods H1810: Macon’s Bill No. 2 positioned America between France and England HProphet Town and Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa, Shawnee Indians HIn 1808, they establish Prophet Town, but in 1811 William Harrison attacked it and burned it to the ground. Better guns helped the whites in their victory.

8 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers The Public Domain in 1810

9 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers THE WAR OF 1812 HPushing North HFighting on Many Fronts HAn Uncertain Victory

10 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers The War of 1812 HJune 1, 1812: President Madison sent England American grievances HBritish Navy’s seizure of Americans HBlockade of American goods HIndian conflicts supported by British HJune 18, 1812: Congress voted to declare war on England

11 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Pushing North HA 3-pronged attack on Canada HNiagara, Detroit, Lake Champlain H1812: British aligned with Indians (Tecumseh) HDetroit and Fort Dearborn HSeptember, 1813: Perry victory at Lake Erie HOctober, 1813: Harrison victory at Battle of the Thames (Ontario) H1814: English defeated Napolean, freeing up troops for war in U.S.

12 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers The Northern Front, War of 1812

13 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Fighting on Many Fronts HMarch, 1814: Horseshoe Bend—defeat of Red Tips and the resulting Treaty gave U.S. 23 million acres of Creek land HAugust 24, 1814: The battle of Bladensburg, MD and the burning of the Capitol and White House by the British HBattle in Baltimore and the “Star Spangled Banner” by Key HJanuary, 1815: The Battle of New Orleans — an overwhelming victory for Jackson

14 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers An Uncertain Victory HFall of 1814 (before the Battle at New Orleans) Madison pursued a peace settlement HThe Treaty of Ghent HNo new territory for either side, no concessions from Britain, a draw

15 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers THE “ERA OF GOOD FEELINGS”? HPraise and Respect for Veterans After the War HA Thriving Economy HTransformations in the Workplace HThe Market Revolution

16 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Praise and Respect for Veterans After the War HVeterans awarded a grant of 160-acre plot between Illinois and Mississippi rivers HMilitary heroes into political leaders HJackson, Harrison, Scott HIndian veterans such as Major Ridge accorded American respect HRidge advocated for Native Americans to retain Native American lands

17 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers A Thriving Economy HHome manufacturing HInternal migration: Going West HNew means of transportation HStagecoaches, wagons, boats, horseback H1807: Fulton and the steamboat H1810: Building of roads; Cumberland Road HBusiness in West, the embargo, war stimulated manufacturing growth throughout the U.S.

18 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Transformations in the Workplace HProduction work reorganized and crafts now done by unskilled workers and overseen by supervisor HNew England: mechanized textile production HRhode Island: Lowell model HThe South: textile mills

19 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Geographic Locations of British Immigrant Textile Workers, 1770-1831

20 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers The Market Revolution HPowerful economic changes fueled by HImprovements in transportation HIncreasing commercialization HRise of factories HMid-nineteenth century, U.S. dramatically different than U.S. of 1776. HTransportation: barriers between country and city fall HEntrepreneurs and putting out system; merchant-capitalists H“Restless” Americans with great “acquisitiveness” HWestern Indians suffer, children and women work in factories

21 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers THE RISE OF THE COTTON PLANTATION ECONOMY HRegional Economies of the South HBlack Family Life and Labor HResistance to Slavery

22 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Regional Economies of the South HShifts in production methods and the depleted tobacco-growing soil led to more crafts production, cultivation of wheat and corn. HSouth Carolina: Technical advances in rice production and cotton cultivation HLouisiana Territory: Cotton and New Orleans sugar

23 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Black Family Life and Labor HIncreasing birth rate and strong family ties among the slaves HNewcomers adopted as relations HLarge plantations had more 2-parent families than the smaller farms HThe task system (rice plantations) and the gang system (cotton plantations) HForms of labor: HWork under white supervision HPrivate work including tending gardens, working on living quarters HSale or clandestine exchanges of goods

24 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Resistance to Slavery HRetaining African cultural traditions HArtistic, dress, language HIntentional careless work HTheft of masters goods HRunning away HRevolt H1811: St. Charles and St. John the Baptist parishes in Louisiana. (Charles Deslondes)

25 ©2006 PEARSON EDUCATION, INC. Publishing as Longman Publishers Estimated Population of the United States: 1790-1860


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