Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Project Partners: Rachel Hirsch, York University, Toronto Gwen Healey, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit Knowledge Sharing About Climate Change.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Project Partners: Rachel Hirsch, York University, Toronto Gwen Healey, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit Knowledge Sharing About Climate Change."— Presentation transcript:

1 Project Partners: Rachel Hirsch, York University, Toronto Gwen Healey, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit Knowledge Sharing About Climate Change Related Food Insecurity in the Arctic Objectives: 1.ways of knowing about Arctic climate change 2.tools for assessing the use of Inuit knowledge

2

3 Northwest Passage, September 2007 (Source: NASA Images)

4 Photographer: Rahabi Kamookak (Gjoa Haven)

5 Key Impacts on Northern Communities (Government of Canada Report: From Impacts to Adaptation, Furgal & Prowse, 2008) changes in the cryosphere –e.g., ice roads, containment ponds biodiversity shifts –e.g., migration patterns, invasion maintenance of traditional ways of life –e.g., subsistence, movement on land/ice

6 Canada’s Domestic Action: Northern Climate Change Adaptation Government of Canada “assessing key vulnerabilities and health impacts related to climate change in Northern / Inuit populations” “disseminating management tools for adaptation” Indian and Northern Affairs Canada subsidized food mail program (since 1960s); evaluative surveys ( )

7 State of the Arctic Community Health and Well-being Research Agenda: Climate Change Policy Imperatives for the Canadian Arctic Policy Actions Vulnerability Resiliency

8 “I will say as an example that traditional food is, of course, the best in terms of consumption of food in the north, because [we’re] used to it. And traditional food, there’s no bad food in that sense. But since the introduction of southern foods, there’s all kinds of choices now … just look at the stores, I can give you an example of one store, a little store that has aisles and aisles of stuff. I can’t even say that they’re food. They’re stuff. But you consume through your mouth, but they’re not really healthy at all. They’re just all junk food.” -- Participant #6 (Healey, 2006) Case Example: Climate Change Related Food Security in Nunavut

9 Health Canada Climate Change and Health Adaptation in Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities Program (Total Funded Communities = 37) Projects Projects Projects Canada’s Domestic Action: Northern Climate Change Adaptation and Health

10 "We’ll be seeing more of this... more machines for sale. We won’t be able to use them any more when it warms up”. Case Example: Climate Change Related Food Security in Nunavut Concerns: - changed ways of hunting - inability to hunt at all Source: Healey, Magner, Ritter, Kamookak, Aningmiuq, Issaluk, Mackenzie, Allardyce, Stockdale, & Moffit, 2010 (Accepted to Arctic). Photographer: Rahabi Kamookak (Gjoa Haven)

11 Community Health and Well-being Policy Actions State of the Arctic Knowledge Scientific Indigenous Local Other… Research Agenda: How to know about the state of the Canadian Arctic?

12 (Gilligan et al., 2006) –Scientific knowledge Western/European approach; empirical analysis; researching and recording observations –Local knowledge group and place specific; direct experience; short-term –Inuit/Inuk knowledge “knowledge system based on tradition that is created, preserved and dispersed” (tradition = capacity for adjustment to environmental extremes) inter-generational, interconnectivity within and between human-natural systems Multiple Ways of Knowing

13 (Furgal, Fletcher and Dickson, 2006 for Environment Canada)

14 With whom do climate change policy stakeholders at different levels of government (e.g., regional, territorial, national) share information about specific community knowledge projects? What value is attached to different types of knowledge (Inuit, local, scientific)? How do these communications benefit or harm the community of origin? Importance of Assessing Knowledge Integration in the Policy Process

15 How are multiple ways of knowing about climate change related food insecurity in Nunavut translated from research to policy? 1.develop an evaluative tool (i.e., a protocol) for assessing information exchange based on multiple ways of knowing 2.engage stakeholders in a dialogue (i.e., mapping exercise) of knowledge sharing about their policy stories Research Question and Objectives

16 (Mertens et al., 2005) Proposed Methods: Knowledge Network Mapping Purpose –connect micro (individual) to macro (institutional or inter-institutional) Benefits –understand connectivity between otherwise isolated nodes –visual illustration of relationships between nodes including information flows –identify who is involved (and who is absent) and to what extent

17 Proposed Methods: Mapping Interviews Initial goal: develop protocol for mapping interviews –descriptive and participatory 15+ minutes for survey plus input on procedure questionnaire: information use, prioritization, knowledge specification (output -> knowledge map) parallel dialogue about the nature of knowledge sharing (output -> narrative policy analysis) –bi-directional snowball sampling begin with disseminated findings (e.g., for sale ski-doo) info sharing; saturation –local-up, national-down

18 Informal institutional knowledge networks Source: Chan & Liebowitz, 2006

19 Legend Knowledge Type local scientific mixed traditional Priority food security conservation Iqaluit Municipal Council Amaruq Hunters and Trappers Committee GN: Department of Environment GN: Department of Health and Social Services Health Canada Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Indian and Northern Affairs Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. QHRC

20 Legend Knowledge Type local scientific mixed traditional Priority food security conservation Iqaluit Municipal Council Amaruq Hunters and Trappers Committee GN: Department of Environment GN: Department of Health and Social Services Health Canada Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Indian and Northern Affairs Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. QHRC

21 Legend Knowledge Type local scientific mixed traditional Priority food security conservation Iqaluit Municipal Council Amaruq Hunters and Trappers Committee GN: Department of Environment GN: Department of Health and Social Services Health Canada Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami Indian and Northern Affairs Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. QHRC

22 Potential Contributions Theory: Is the integration of various types of knowledge (e.g., Inuit, local, scientific, etc.) possible; and, if so - how does this facilitate or constrain community participation in environment and health policy development? Method: Is rigour enhanced by first mapping the structure of institutional communications across scales and then exploring the processes underlying this knowledge exchange? Policy: What opportunities and obstacles for communicating about climate change adaptation policy development might the synthesis of these ‘policy stories’ uncover?

23 Acknowledgements My committee (York U): Bonnie Kettel, Martin Bunch, Karen Kraft Sloan, and Rick Bello Collaborators: Michael Svoboda (Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op), Scot Nickels (ITK), Eric Loring (ITK), Carrie Grable (ITK), Erin Meyers (FNIHB- HC), and Diane McClymont Peace (FNIHB-HC) ArcticNet Project Member: “Integrating and Translating ArcticNet Science for Sustainable Communities and National and Global Policy and Decision-Making” (Leaders: Chris Furgal, Trent and David Hik, U of A)

24 Adaptive Co-management Parkes & Panelli, 2001

25 (Roe, 1994) Modelling Communication: Narrative Policy Analysis Narrative Policy Analysis Identify the main story developed by each opposing stakeholder group Consider any alternative stories, alterations to the current stories, or potential counter- narratives Consider how any alternatives may be coalesced into a larger meta-narrative

26 Ways of Knowing: Health Risk Management (Gowda, 1999) Modern Medicine illness orientated treated in isolation ‘how’ illness occurred natural causes Aboriginal Medicine wellness orientated treated in family/community setting ‘why’ illness occurred natural and supernatural causes


Download ppt "Project Partners: Rachel Hirsch, York University, Toronto Gwen Healey, Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit Knowledge Sharing About Climate Change."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google