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Stronger economies. Better lives. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO MENTORING: EXPERIENCE OF THE NASKAPI FIRST NATION OF KAWAWACHIKAMACH.

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Presentation on theme: "Stronger economies. Better lives. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO MENTORING: EXPERIENCE OF THE NASKAPI FIRST NATION OF KAWAWACHIKAMACH."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stronger economies. Better lives. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO MENTORING: EXPERIENCE OF THE NASKAPI FIRST NATION OF KAWAWACHIKAMACH

2 ALL SMILES!

3 Provide background on the two partners: Kawawachikamach and CESO Describe how participants were assessed and learning plans generated Describe how learning occurred Outline the outcomes Facilitate a practice session relative to one of the competencies *PLEASE HOLD QUESTIONS TO THE END* OBJECTIVES

4 A Naskapi community of about 1,100 members. Approx. 16 km NE of Schefferville, QC close to Labrador border. Home to the Naskapis since its construction in the early 1980s. BACKGROUND: KAWAWA

5 Map of Quebec First Nations

6 VISION We envision a world where there are sustainable economic and social opportunities for all. MISSION We help individuals and organizations to build strong, viable businesses and self-sustaining communities that will in turn create opportunities and a better quality of life for generations to come. OUR FOCUS Economic Development and Governance BACKGROUND: CESO

7 SERVICE AREAS We work across a broad range of sectors and industries and in response to client demand. Our areas of services include: Strategic Planning Business Development Accounting and Finance Organizational Development Community Development Governance Production and Operations OUR STRENGTHS Demand-driven assistance with results focus Value for Money No Vested Interest BACKGROUND: CESO

8 Feb. 2009: CESO presentation to Quebec First Nation Health Managers April 2009: first Kawawa application submitted to CESO Nov. 2010 – May 2011: pilot project with one-on-one mentoring  so successful that decision made to expand the program Sept. 2011 – ongoing: next phase with 12 participants and 2 volunteer advisers (VAs) initially  First visit focused on building relationship that is honest, open and respectful.  Discussed and agreed on process and timeframe.  Continued with quarterly VA visits to the community followed by monthly mentoring by phone  Aug. 2012: Health Canada funding ended  VAs agreed to continue mentoring by phone  Funding found for community visits in Sept. 2013 and Sept. 2014 HOW THIS INITIATIVE EVOLVED

9 Used FNHMA Competency Framework. Guided self-assessment Strengths & Deficits Individual & Group Learning Plans Individual plans guided with one-on-one interactions. Group plans, informed workshops and other group activities. ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING STRATEGIES

10 Integrated Adult Learning Principles Client served as Internal Champion providing day-to-day leadership and encouragement. N.B.: We tried to integrate the concept of cultural values into all discussions, group and individual. ASSESSMENT AND LEARNING STRATEGIES

11 GROUP LEARNING PLAN DOMAINS OBJECTIVES (to increase the group`s knowledge and understanding with respect to …) ACTIVITIESTIMEFRAMESUPPORT REQUIRED OUTCOMES (Participants have …) Leadership & Governance  leadership & governance in general  ongoing brownbag lunch discussions  quarterly  CESO VAs  supervisors  DG, CLSC increased competence as First Nation health managers with an emphasis on: a) systems management and leadership; b) team management and leadership; c) personal skills development increased motivation and confidence in undertaking the range of functions of First Nation health manager attitudes to work that have evolved to be in line with needs of the community Professionalism  developing a code of ethics  workshop  group discussions  Jan. 2013 (1/2 day)  CESO VAs Advocacy, Partnerships & Relationships  inter- jurisdictional issues (federal, provincial, municipal, inter- and intra- organizational)  policy development  workshop  workshop  June 2012 (1/2 day)  March 2013 (full day)  CESO VAs  CESO VA Human Resource Management  HR management in general  workshop  external training where warranted  t.b.d.  CESO VAs  external trainers (if required)

12 GROUP LEARNING PLAN DOMAINS OBJECTIVES (to increase the group`s knowledge and understanding with respect to …) ACTIVITIESTIMEFRAMESUPPORT REQUIRED OUTCOMES (Participants have …) Financial Management  financial management in general  workshop  external training where warranted  t.b.d.  CESO VAs  external trainers (if required) a clear understanding of their role both as an employee and as a member of the Health Committee a clear understanding of the overall vision of health for their community Health Services Delivery  holistic health  facilitated group discussion  June 2012 (1/2 day)  CESO VAs Quality Improvement  CQI (including the intra-agency approach)  workshop  t.b.d.  CESO VAs Planning  integrated planning systems  workshop  March 2012 (full day)  CESO VAs

13 GROUP LEARNING PLAN DOMAINS OBJECTIVES (to increase the group`s knowledge and understanding with respect to …) ACTIVITIESTIMEFRAMESUPPORT REQUIRED OUTCOMES (Participants have …) Communication  facilitating meetings  written communication  oral communication  proposal writing  workshop  workshop  workshop  workshop  March 2012 (1/2 day)  Jan. 2013 (1/2 day)  Sept 2012 (1/2 day)  Jan. 2012 (1/2 day)  CESO VAs Cultural Awareness  how to integrate culture into one’s daily job  facilitated group discussion  brown bag lunch discussion  Sept 2012 (1/2 day)  CESO VAs  community elders

14 GENERIC INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN DOMAINSOBJECTIVESACTIVITIESTIMEFRAME SUPPORT REQUIRED OUTCOMES Leadership & Governance to address specific gaps identified in strengths and gaps analyses in order to improve individuals` skills & attitudes coaching mentoring role modelling job enrichment other approaches as needed Sept. 2013 CESO VAs supervisors DG, CLSC NB. VAs will be available for at least one face-to-face session per quarter and by phone and email at all other times increased competence as First Nation health managers with an emphasis on: a) systems management and leadership; b) team management and leadership; c) personal skills development increased motivation and confidence in undertaking the range of functions of First Nation health managers attitudes to work that have evolved to be in line with needs of the community a clear understanding of their role both as an employee and as a member of the Health Committee Professionalism Advocacy, Partnerships & Relationships Human Resources Management Financial Management

15 GENERIC INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN DOMAINSOBJECTIVES ACTIVITIESTIMEFRAME SUPPORT REQUIRED OUTCOMES Health Services Delivery a clear understanding of the overall vision of health for their community Quality Improvement Planning Communication Cultural Awareness

16 LEARNING ACTIVITIES Quarterly community visits One-on-one interviews: half a day each Workshops: half to a full day Proposal writing Planning Facilitating meetings Inter-jurisdictional issues Holistic health Integrating culture into the job Written communications Time management Teamwork LEARNING STRATEGIES

17 Continued… Brown bag lunches open discussion back pocket issues Phone sessions were done in between quarterly community visits. After money ran out  exclusively phone sessions This was marginally adequate, yet problematic Hard to maintain enthusiasm without face-to-face contact N.B. secure, sustainable funding is very important. LEARNING STRATEGIES

18 There are no ultimate outcomes as the initiative is not yet finished. Upon evaluation, participants assessed the experience to be helpful and valuable. For questions such as “Can you use what you learned? Was the session interesting? Were you able to understand the presenter?” scores given were between 4.5 to 5 out of 5. Some participants left comments such as “You people make these sessions simple.”; “The program workshop –for me it works.”; “Politics frustrate me but it is good to know how government works.” Informal anecdotal feedback from participants is extremely positive. OUTCOMES

19 Health Canada funding to CESO ended in May 2012 so VA site visits were suspended However, funding to CESO from the RBC foundation (2013-14) permitted 2 additional site visits by VAs. And mentoring by phone continues (bandwidth in Kawawa area is too poor to sustain Skype/videocom use though maybe in the future …) CESO and Kawawa are searching for funding opportunities for on-site visits in order to pursue this successful partnership  all suggestions are welcome! NEXT STEPS

20 QUESTIONS? THANK YOU! WESTERN CANADA and ONTARIO: Fayaz Noormohamed: fnoormohamed@ceso-saco.com, 1-800-268-9052 x 4101fnoormohamed@ceso-saco.com QUEBEC and the ATLANTIC: Gabrielle Tardif: gtardif@saco-ceso.com, 1-800-268-9052 x 5809gtardif@saco-ceso.com NUNAVUT and NORTHWEST TERRITORIES: Ulrike Komaksiutiksak: ukomaksiutiksak@ceso-saco.com, 1-800-268-9052 x 5731ukomaksiutiksak@ceso-saco.com


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