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Hinduism (1500 BCE-1900 CE) The World’s Third Largest Religion By: Lauren Pinion, James Pitman, and Amanda Shaw.

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Presentation on theme: "Hinduism (1500 BCE-1900 CE) The World’s Third Largest Religion By: Lauren Pinion, James Pitman, and Amanda Shaw."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hinduism (1500 BCE-1900 CE) The World’s Third Largest Religion By: Lauren Pinion, James Pitman, and Amanda Shaw

2 The Spread of Hunduism Sacred Hindu Sites The Vedas (Sacred Texts) Maps and Sacred Texts

3 Hanuman Jayanti Ganesha Durga Santhoshi Hindu Gods and Goddesses

4 ChronologyChronology 1500 BCE: Aryan invaders bring velidic religion, which is a sacred literature and collection of hymns in the Hinduism religion BCE: Aryans, whom are followers of the Hinduism religion, migrate into Southern Asia BCE: The first phase of Hinduism known as Brahmanism develops, and this brings attention to social and ritual obligation. 800 BCE: Buddhism and Jainism affect Hinduism because they took away the followers of Hinduism, and they made Hinduism more moderate and not as extreme. 700 BCE: Vaishnavism develops around the cult of Vishnu, which is a god in the Hinduism religion. Vaishnavas are communities that are divided into smaller parts, which focus on one form of Vishnu. 600 BCE: The first form of the caste system is recognized, which consists of Brahmins- which are religious leaders Kshatriyas-which are nobles and warriors Vaisyas-which are artisans and formers Shudras-also known as unskilled laborers 500 BCE: Upanishads are written and sutras emerge as complete scriptures. The Upanishads reflect the ideas of karma, as well as reincarnation and dharma. 400 BCE: Ramayana is written, which is a very important book in the Hinduism religion. Gandhi referred to it as the greatest book in the world.

5 ChronologyChronology BCE: Mauryan Dynasty founded, which Chandragupta ruled from 324 BCE to 301 BCE BCE: Chandragupta founded the Mauryan dynasty during this time period. 100 CE: The religion of Hinduism spreads to Southeast Asia most likely because of war and trade. 200 CE: This is the beginning of the Vedanta system, which is a Brahmanical system where all the power resides in the priest CE: Gupta Empire, also known as the Golden Age of Indian culture, is founded in this time frame CE: The Gupta Empire separates into several kingdoms CE: The rise of devotional movements, such as Puja which is basically reverence to a god or spirit through rituals and prayers CE: The Mughal Empire falls and the British begin to take power over India CE: National Independence War between the British and India occurs during this time frame CE: The society of Vedanta states that Hinduism is a world religion and the country of India is a single nation CE: Independence is given back to India, but there are some conflicts that arise between the Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs.

6 Politics -Hindus were to only marriage within their caste, and to neither marry above nor below their own caste. -The lowest caste wasforced to perform the most menial and degrading jobs with virtually no chance of escape from their fate. -The structure of the Indian government sets up for confrontation between Hindus and Muslums. These confrontations are the basis for power in government. Intellectual Innovations -Dharma keeps the people in check with ethical conduct, caste rules, and civil and criminal law. -Karma is the concept of "action" or "deed” which keeps the Hindu Indian people in check. Religion -The most dominant religion in India today is Hinduism. -About 80% of Indians are Hindus. -Indians generally participate in cultural festivals such as “Phagwah” and “Diwali”, regardless of their religious beliefs. -Hindu cultural and religious traditions are almost synonymous with Indian identity. Art -The walls of many Hindu temples and other public buildings are oftencovered in large murals of deities and potrayals of the three goals of life (dharma, karma, arthra) -Deities are frequently portrayed with multiple arms because this emphasizes the immense power of the deity and his or her ability to perform several feats at the same time. Technology -In the wars depicted in the holy books, many characters had weapons similar to modern day war weapons. These included aircrafts that could surpass the speed of light and arrows that could carry bombs. Architecture -Most Hindu homes have a small shrine called a “puja room.” -The architecture of Hindu temples evolved over a period of more than 2,000 years and there is a great variety in this architecture. -Hindu temples are of different shapes and sizes – rectangular, octagonal, semicircular – with different types of domes and gates. Society -There are four castes in society arranged in a hierarchy. These are priests, warriors, businessmen, and peasants. Below these four castes there are casteless, also known as the untouchables. -Evidence of this social structure still exists today. -Religiously, people are born in a caste and it cannot be changed. Economy -The caste system affected Indian economic development because it was used to determine the economic status of all Hindus within the country. -There has however been a great deal of debate as to whether the caste system still has a legacy that continues to affect the economic development of India. Regional Impact (India)

7 Political -Has received opposition from the entrenched Christian elites and Muslim minorities of these countries. Intellectual -Dharma keeps the people in check with ethical conduct, caste rules, and civil and criminal law. -Karma is the concept of "action" or "deed” which keeps the Hindu Indian people in check. Religion It has mostly been confined to practice by the Indo-African communities of these countries. -Home to over 25,000 Hindus, mostly local converts and more recent, post-independence Indian immigrants. -Hinduism has been cited as possessing many parallels to African spirituality. Art -The walls of many Hindu temples and other public buildings are oftencovered in large murals of deities and potrayals of the three goals of life (dharma, karma, arthra) -Deities are frequently portrayed with multiple arms because this emphasizes the immense power of the deity and his or her ability to perform several feats at the same time. Technology -In the wars depicted in the holy books, many characters had weapons similar to modern day war weapons. These included aircrafts that could surpass the speed of light and arrows that could carry bombs. Architecture -Several temples belonging to the faith have been built in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia. -Most Hindu homes have a small shrine called a “puja room.” -The architecture of Hindu temples evolved over a period of more than 2,000 years and there is a great variety in this architecture. -Hindu temples are of different shapes and sizes – rectangular, octagonal, semicircular – with different types of domes and gates. Society -There are four castes in society arranged in a hierarchy. These are priests, warriors, businessmen, and peasants. Below these four castes there are casteless, also known as the untouchables. -Evidence of this social structure still exists today. -Religiously, people are born in a caste and it cannot be changed Economy -Many Indians left their homeland to seek their fortunes as soldiers, civil servicemen, and indentured servants throughout the British Empire, settling mainly in the British colonies of Southern and Eastern Africa. Their descendants eventually gained middle- class status in these countries, a position which has changed little. Regional Impact (Africa)

8 Regional Impact (Southeast Asia) Political -Hindu kings began to make forays into Sri Lanka and parts of southeast Asia as early as the 7th century C.E. -Appears to have originated in the region of the Indus Valley in what is today Pakistan perhaps as much as 4000 years ago. -Spread into Southeast Asia before the advent of Christianity. Intellectual -Dharma keeps the people in check with ethical conduct, caste rules, and civil and criminal law. -Karma is the concept of "action" or "deed” which keeps the Hindu Indian people in check. Religion -The earliest material evidence of Hinduism in Southeast Asia comes from Borneo. Hinduism has remained essentially a cultural religion of South Asia and is more than a faith; it is a way of life. Art -The walls of many Hindu temples and other public buildings are oftencovered in large murals of deities and potrayals of the three goals of life (dharma, karma, arthra) -Deities are frequently portrayed with multiple arms because this emphasizes the immense power of the deity and his or her ability to perform several feats at the same time. Technology -In the wars depicted in the holy books, many characters had weapons similar to modern day war weapons. These included aircrafts that could surpass the speed of light and arrows that could carry bombs. Architecture Most Hindu homes have a small shrine called a “puja room.” -The architecture of Hindu temples evolved over a period of more than 2,000 years and there is a great variety in this architecture. -Hindu temples are of different shapes and sizes – rectangular, octagonal, semicircular – with different types of domes and gates. Society -Temples and shrines, holy animals by the tens of millions, and the sights and sounds of endless processions and rituals all contribute to a unique atmosphere in these lands. Economy -Many Hindus searching for a better life have moved from rural villages towards larger cities. This has added to the economy of these large cities merchants and traders as well as cheaper labor.

9 Regional Impact (Caribbean) Political -Britain was in control of most Caribbean nations. They brought over Indian slaves. These slaves brought and spread the Hindu religion in these parts. Intellectual -Dharma keeps the people in check with ethical conduct, caste rules, and civil and criminal law. -Karma is the concept of "action" or "deed” which keeps the Hindu Indian people in check. Religion -Evolved from main stream Hinduism into a Caribbean style Hinduism. This has different social and religious practices than most forms of Hinduism. Art -The walls of many Hindu temples and other public buildings are often covered in large murals of deities and portrayals of the three goals of life (dharma, karma, arthra) -Deities are frequently portrayed with multiple arms because this emphasizes the immense power of the deity and his or her ability to perform several feats at the same time. Technology -In the wars depicted in the holy books, many characters had weapons similar to modern day war weapons. These included aircrafts that could surpass the speed of light and arrows that could carry bombs. Architecture -Most Hindu homes have a small shrine called a “puja room.” -The architecture of Hindu temples evolved over a period of more than 2,000 years and there is a great variety in this architecture. -Hindu temples are of different shapes and sizes – rectangular, octagonal, semicircular – with different types of domes and gates. Society -There are four castes in society arranged in a hierarchy. These are priests, warriors, businessmen, and peasants. Below these four castes there are casteless, also known as the untouchables. -Evidence of this social structure still exists today. -Religiously, people are born in a caste and it cannot be changed Economy -European ships set sail for Caribbean colonies. They had items for African slave traders. The slaves were captured and shipped from Africa to the islands. Sugar and rum were exported from the Caribbean back to Europe.

10 Change Over Time In the beiginning of Hinduism, people were mainly ritualistic. Over the years, teachers like Adi Sankara and Ramanuja initiated the knowledge part, and the arrival of Swami Vivekananda marked a changed perception of Hinduism as less of a ritualistic religion. Followers of the Bhakti movement moved away from the abstract concept of Brahman, which the philosopher Adi Shankara consolidated a few centuries before, with emotional, passionate devotion towards the more accessible avatars, especially Krishna and Rama. The Arya Society, founded in 1875 by Swami Dayananda which went back to the Vedas as the ultimate revealed source of truth and attempted to purge Hinduism of more recent accretions that had no basis in the scriptures. The Arya Society is a small society that still works to purify Hindu rituals, convert tribal people, and run centers throughout India. The spread of Hindu religous sentiment parallels a similar rise in religious biased devotion among religious minorities, including Muslims and Sikhs. there have been major nonviolent changes, as new sectarian movements continue to grow and as established movements change. The dominant tendency of the more modern Hindu religion is following the example of the great teachers of the past, to be nonviolent towards all living beings, and to accept the remarkable diversity of Indian religion.. This is reiterated by Mahatma Gandhi and most modern gurus. Brahman, the ultimate reality for the Hindu, is a hard term to define in history because its meaning has changedsignificantly over a period of time. In the beiginning of Hinduism, people were mainly ritualistic. Over the years, teachers like Adi Sankara and Ramanuja initiated the knowledge part, and the arrival of Swami Vivekananda marked a changed perception of Hinduism as less of a ritualistic religion. Followers of the Bhakti movement moved away from the abstract concept of Brahman, which the philosopher Adi Shankara consolidated a few centuries before, with emotional, passionate devotion towards the more accessible avatars, especially Krishna and Rama. The Arya Society, founded in 1875 by Swami Dayananda which went back to the Vedas as the ultimate revealed source of truth and attempted to purge Hinduism of more recent accretions that had no basis in the scriptures. The Arya Society is a small society that still works to purify Hindu rituals, convert tribal people, and run centers throughout India. The spread of Hindu religous sentiment parallels a similar rise in religious biased devotion among religious minorities, including Muslims and Sikhs. there have been major nonviolent changes, as new sectarian movements continue to grow and as established movements change. The dominant tendency of the more modern Hindu religion is following the example of the great teachers of the past, to be nonviolent towards all living beings, and to accept the remarkable diversity of Indian religion.. This is reiterated by Mahatma Gandhi and most modern gurus. Brahman, the ultimate reality for the Hindu, is a hard term to define in history because its meaning has changedsignificantly over a period of time.

11 Change Over Time Activist Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh emerged to protect Hinduism through the RSS. The RSS had been founded in 1925 by Keshav Baliram Hedgewar and was based of the concern that Hinduism was in danger of extinction from its external foes and needed a strong, militant force of devotees to protect it. The VHP organization demolished a mosque in Ayodhya during a huge demonstration in As a result, the Ministry of Home Affairs imposed a two-year ban on the Vishwa Hindu Parishad under the Unlawful Activities Act. When the ban expired in December 1994, the government reimposed it for two additional years. Hindu rituals, called upacharass, change with time. For example, in the past few hundred years some rituals, such as sacred dance and music offerings in the standard Sodasa Upacharas set prescribed by the Agama Shastraa, were replaced by the offerings of rice and sweets. The many festivals of Hinduism change throughout the year because they typically celebrate events from Hindu mythology. Therefore, they often coinciding with seasonal changes. Hinduism started out very small and has grown to become the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam. The linkage of religion, the national government, and nationalism led to a degeneration of the separation of church and state in India. This, in turn, had decreased the level of religious tolerance in that country. The Aryan conquerors lived side by side with the indigenous inhabitants of the subcontinent, and many features of Hinduism may have been adapted from the religions of the non-Aryan peoples of India. Activist Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh emerged to protect Hinduism through the RSS. The RSS had been founded in 1925 by Keshav Baliram Hedgewar and was based of the concern that Hinduism was in danger of extinction from its external foes and needed a strong, militant force of devotees to protect it. The VHP organization demolished a mosque in Ayodhya during a huge demonstration in As a result, the Ministry of Home Affairs imposed a two-year ban on the Vishwa Hindu Parishad under the Unlawful Activities Act. When the ban expired in December 1994, the government reimposed it for two additional years. Hindu rituals, called upacharass, change with time. For example, in the past few hundred years some rituals, such as sacred dance and music offerings in the standard Sodasa Upacharas set prescribed by the Agama Shastraa, were replaced by the offerings of rice and sweets. The many festivals of Hinduism change throughout the year because they typically celebrate events from Hindu mythology. Therefore, they often coinciding with seasonal changes. Hinduism started out very small and has grown to become the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam. The linkage of religion, the national government, and nationalism led to a degeneration of the separation of church and state in India. This, in turn, had decreased the level of religious tolerance in that country. The Aryan conquerors lived side by side with the indigenous inhabitants of the subcontinent, and many features of Hinduism may have been adapted from the religions of the non-Aryan peoples of India.

12 ComparisonsComparisons Hinduism developed in India and spread through southeast Asia,Africa and the Caribbean The people of the Caribbean were introduced to Hinduism as being brought there as labor this was also how Hinduism was brought to Africa however Hinduism spread in southeast Asia through trade Hinduism in the Caribbean was very similar however the reduction in practice of the traditional Hindu caste system is similar in modes of worship and celebrations, the establishment of Hindu temples and the practice of Hindu ‘bamboo’ marriage. Since Indians were allowed to practice their religion in their new environment, to a large extent, Hinduism is very much alive in the Caribbean Hinduism was very similar in Africa because they were introduced in the same manor In south east Asia however it moved through conquest of many of the Asian empires Hinduism developed in India and spread through southeast Asia,Africa and the Caribbean The people of the Caribbean were introduced to Hinduism as being brought there as labor this was also how Hinduism was brought to Africa however Hinduism spread in southeast Asia through trade Hinduism in the Caribbean was very similar however the reduction in practice of the traditional Hindu caste system is similar in modes of worship and celebrations, the establishment of Hindu temples and the practice of Hindu ‘bamboo’ marriage. Since Indians were allowed to practice their religion in their new environment, to a large extent, Hinduism is very much alive in the Caribbean Hinduism was very similar in Africa because they were introduced in the same manor In south east Asia however it moved through conquest of many of the Asian empires

13 Uses in the World Today About 900 million people in the world practice Hinduism today. Hinduism is practiced mainly all over the world, but it is mainly and mostly practiced in India. Many aspects of Hinduism, such as: karma, dharma, and reincarnation are noticed and believed all around the world, and not only by Hindus. Hinduism is the third largest religion in the entire world. There are many songs of and about karma and dharma in the new age music of today’s society. Hindu studies are now offered as a major in many colleges and universities in today’s society. There are Hindu temples in almost every country of the world today. Many science theories in today’s society come from the Vedas in the Hinduism religion. About 900 million people in the world practice Hinduism today. Hinduism is practiced mainly all over the world, but it is mainly and mostly practiced in India. Many aspects of Hinduism, such as: karma, dharma, and reincarnation are noticed and believed all around the world, and not only by Hindus. Hinduism is the third largest religion in the entire world. There are many songs of and about karma and dharma in the new age music of today’s society. Hindu studies are now offered as a major in many colleges and universities in today’s society. There are Hindu temples in almost every country of the world today. Many science theories in today’s society come from the Vedas in the Hinduism religion.

14 BibliographyBibliography "10 Religious Scriptures Explained - Top 10 Lists | Listverse." Top 10 Lists - Listverse. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://listverse.com/2007/09/19/10-religious-scriptures-explained/ Dasa, Shukavak N.. "Hinduism and Science." Sanskrit.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Hindu%20Primer/hinduismandscience.html Harris, Angela. "Hindu Beliefs." HubPages. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Oct http://hubpages.com/hub/Hindu-Beliefs "Hindu Basics." Kauai's Hindu Monastery. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Oct http://www.himalayanacademy.com/basics/fourf/ "Hinduism, Third Largest Religion in World, Hindus." Buddha Statues, Hindu Statue, Hindu Gods, Shiva Ganesh, God Statue, Om. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Oct http://www.lotussculpture.com/Popularreligion.htm "Hinduism maps." World Religions. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.worldreligions.psu.edu/maps-hinduism.htm "Karma Triyana Dharmachakra: His Holiness Karmapa." Karma Triyana Dharmachakra: His Holiness Karmapa. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.kagyu.org "Hindu Gods, Hinduism." Free Encyclopedia & Web Portal on Indian Culture & Lifestyle. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct "Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha." Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct < Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha." Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct "10 Religious Scriptures Explained - Top 10 Lists | Listverse." Top 10 Lists - Listverse. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://listverse.com/2007/09/19/10-religious-scriptures-explained/ Dasa, Shukavak N.. "Hinduism and Science." Sanskrit.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Hindu%20Primer/hinduismandscience.html Harris, Angela. "Hindu Beliefs." HubPages. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Oct http://hubpages.com/hub/Hindu-Beliefs "Hindu Basics." Kauai's Hindu Monastery. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Oct http://www.himalayanacademy.com/basics/fourf/ "Hinduism, Third Largest Religion in World, Hindus." Buddha Statues, Hindu Statue, Hindu Gods, Shiva Ganesh, God Statue, Om. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Oct http://www.lotussculpture.com/Popularreligion.htm "Hinduism maps." World Religions. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.worldreligions.psu.edu/maps-hinduism.htm "Karma Triyana Dharmachakra: His Holiness Karmapa." Karma Triyana Dharmachakra: His Holiness Karmapa. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.kagyu.org "Hindu Gods, Hinduism." Free Encyclopedia & Web Portal on Indian Culture & Lifestyle. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct "Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha." Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct < Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha." Hindu Devotional Mantras Aarti stuti Chalisha. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct

15 Bibliography (Continued) "The Esoteric Blog: Ursi's Eso Garden." The Esoteric Blog: Ursi's Eso Garden. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.eso- garden.com/index.php?/weblog/C36/P30/ "eBhagwan | Hindu Gods - Goddess." eBhagwan. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.ebhagwan.com/ "Hinduism. The main religion of India." pezarkar's info site. adaniel's info site. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://adaniel.tripod.com/hinduism.htm Das, Subhamoy. "All About the Hindu Temple." About Hinduism - What You Need to Know About Hinduism. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://hinduism.about.com/od/temples/p/hindutemple101.htm "Religion and Politics." Religion. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://religion.indianetzone.com/1/religion_politics.htm Period, Time. "Hinduism and Hindu Art | Thematic Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art." The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: metmuseum.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/hind/hd_hind.htm "Religion And The Indian Economy: How Economic Development In India Was Related To Religion." Suite101.com: Online Magazine and Writers' Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.suite101.com/content/religion-as-the-structure-of-the-indian-economy-a70266 "Timeline of Hinduism - ReligionFacts." Religion, World Religions, Comparative Religion - Just the Facts on the World's Religions. Web. 4 Oct http://www.religionfacts.com/hinduism/timeline.htm "Key Dates and Timeline for Hinduism." One-Spirit-Tribe | United Spiritual Wisdom of the Universe. Web. 03 Oct http://one-spirit- tribe.org/religion_hinduism/timeline.htm "History of Hinduism | View Timeline." Xtimeline - Explore and Create Free Timelines. Web. 04 Oct http://www.xtimeline.com/timeline/History-of-Hinduism "The Esoteric Blog: Ursi's Eso Garden." The Esoteric Blog: Ursi's Eso Garden. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.eso- garden.com/index.php?/weblog/C36/P30/ "eBhagwan | Hindu Gods - Goddess." eBhagwan. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.ebhagwan.com/ "Hinduism. The main religion of India." pezarkar's info site. adaniel's info site. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://adaniel.tripod.com/hinduism.htm Das, Subhamoy. "All About the Hindu Temple." About Hinduism - What You Need to Know About Hinduism. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://hinduism.about.com/od/temples/p/hindutemple101.htm "Religion and Politics." Religion. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://religion.indianetzone.com/1/religion_politics.htm Period, Time. "Hinduism and Hindu Art | Thematic Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art." The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: metmuseum.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/hind/hd_hind.htm "Religion And The Indian Economy: How Economic Development In India Was Related To Religion." Suite101.com: Online Magazine and Writers' Network. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Oct http://www.suite101.com/content/religion-as-the-structure-of-the-indian-economy-a70266 "Timeline of Hinduism - ReligionFacts." Religion, World Religions, Comparative Religion - Just the Facts on the World's Religions. Web. 4 Oct http://www.religionfacts.com/hinduism/timeline.htm "Key Dates and Timeline for Hinduism." One-Spirit-Tribe | United Spiritual Wisdom of the Universe. Web. 03 Oct http://one-spirit- tribe.org/religion_hinduism/timeline.htm "History of Hinduism | View Timeline." Xtimeline - Explore and Create Free Timelines. Web. 04 Oct http://www.xtimeline.com/timeline/History-of-Hinduism

16 Bibliography (Continued) Harris, By Angela. "Hindu Beliefs." HubPages. Web. 04 Oct http://hubpages.com/hub/Hindu-Beliefs "Hinduism, Third Largest Religion in World, Hindus." Buddha Statues, Hindu Statue, Hindu Gods, Shiva Ganesh, God Statue, Om. Web. 04 Oct http://www.lotussculpture.com/Popularreligion.htm “Main Menu." Sanskrit.org. Web. 05 Oct Primer/hinduismandscience.html.http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Hindu Primer/hinduismandscience.html Harris, By Angela. "Hindu Beliefs." HubPages. Web. 04 Oct http://hubpages.com/hub/Hindu-Beliefs "Hinduism, Third Largest Religion in World, Hindus." Buddha Statues, Hindu Statue, Hindu Gods, Shiva Ganesh, God Statue, Om. Web. 04 Oct http://www.lotussculpture.com/Popularreligion.htm “Main Menu." Sanskrit.org. Web. 05 Oct Primer/hinduismandscience.html.http://www.sanskrit.org/www/Hindu Primer/hinduismandscience.html

17 Who Did What? Amanda Shaw: Chronology & Change Over Time Lauren Pinion: PIRATES & Uses in Today’s World James Pitman: Comparison & Maps/Pictures Amanda Shaw: Chronology & Change Over Time Lauren Pinion: PIRATES & Uses in Today’s World James Pitman: Comparison & Maps/Pictures


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