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Laugarvegur Trail Description Day 1: Skogar to Fimmvörðuhals We start our hike from the waterfall at Skogar, following the path along the gorge of the.

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Presentation on theme: "Laugarvegur Trail Description Day 1: Skogar to Fimmvörðuhals We start our hike from the waterfall at Skogar, following the path along the gorge of the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Laugarvegur Trail Description Day 1: Skogar to Fimmvörðuhals We start our hike from the waterfall at Skogar, following the path along the gorge of the Skogá river. The trail passes many waterfalls and steep cliffs. About halfway up to the pass it meets up with the track to the old Fimmvörðuhals hut. We pass the old A-frame and head for about another hour to the new hut (much better!) which is located on a scenic ridge overlooking Eyafjalla and Mýrdalsjökull (and probably the new volcano on Eyafjallajökull. There is no road to the hut, so you’ll have to carry your sleeping bag etc. for the past mile or so. Day 2: Fimmvörðuhals to Þórsmörk It’s all downhill today. First we pass the lava fields of the new Eyafjallajökull volcano and soon we will have great views of Þórsmörk. Before reaching Morinsheiði the trail is a bit exposed and secured with chains. Nothing to worry about. After Morinsheiði the trail is well marked, but just before you reach the valley floor you’ll have to cross one more rather exposed ridges. You might want to wait for one of the guides if you’re afraid of heights. There is a bridge downstream from the hut at Þórsmörk, so no need to wade through the Krossá river. Day 3: Þórsmörk to Botnar Today’s trail follows the Markafljót river, which flows in a quite impressive canyon and is rarely seen from the trail. Across the canyon you can see Einhyrningur a rather impressive landmark. The trail gains steadily in elevation. Shortly before the hut at Botnar the trail turns to the east and drops down into the narrow canyon of the Emstruá, where you’ll lose most of the elevation you’ve gained throughout the day. However, clawing your way up the “Botnar Step” just before you reach the hut guarantees bragging rights galore! Day 4: Botnar to Álftavatn The trail passes through relatively level, black lava deserts, which can give rise to impressive sand storms and winds through bright-green, moss-covered volcanic hills. After crossing the (unbridged) Bláfjallakvísl the trail winds through smaller hills until it reaches the hut at Álftavatn. Day 5: Álftavatn to Hraftinnusker (Jökulhaus) The trail follows a small stream towards Jökultungur, a quite impressive and steep cliff. However, since it’s early in the day you’ll be up there in no time at all. Some of you might take the (highly recommended) detour up to Háskerðingur for a little glacier walk and awesome views. The trail now winds through a geothermal area until it crosses a wide plain with the Hraftinnusker in plain sight (and yet so far). Depending on snow conditions you’ll find yourself either crossing or circumventing numerous small but annoying gullies (or crossing them comfortably on snow bridges). The hut is rather exposed and most tent sites are surrounded by rock walls to break the wind. Day 6: Hraftinnusker to Landmannalaugar Short but sweet and mostly downhill, the trail first crosses an impressive obsidian flow before it passes another geothermal area. The descent into Landmannalaugar is steep and you can enjoy all the other folks huffing and puffing up the slope. The trail winds through a large lavaflow before it reaches the hut (and hotspring). Soak-time! side trails: Þórsmörk: short hikes up Valahnúkur (pretty obvious) or to the waterfall at Stakkholtsgjá (see map) Álftavatn: climb up to Háskerðingur on your way to Hraftinnusker (see map) Hraftinnusker: supposedly impressive ice caves (stay out!) west of the hut (see map) Landmannalaugar: Bláhnúkur offers a short, rewarding hike and great views Field Trip to Iceland Trinity College Environmental Science Program Common birds in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve image from an interpretive sign in Landmannalaugar Common plants in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve image from an interpretive sign in Landmannalaugar Einhyrningur from Laugarvegurinn 10 Things to do in Reykjavik (a non-exhaustive list of Jon and Christoph’s favorites) 1.Go (window)shopping on Laugarvegur 2.Check out the 3D map of Iceland in the town hall, usually accompanied by a nice photo exhibit 3.Take the elevator up the Hallgrimskirkja 4.Check out the view (free) or fake silicone Vikings at Perlan (Saga Museum). 5.See the ruins of an excavated long house at Reykjavik 871 ± 2, Aðalstræti 16 6.Saga lovers should go to the Culture House (Hverfisgata 15) where you can look at original manuscripts 7.While at the lake (Tjörnin) you can watch (feed) the birds or have a look at some modern art at Hafnarhusið 8.Go whale watching – 3 hour tours leave from the old harbor, right next to the old whaling vessels 9.Take the ferry to Videy 10.Go swimming at the public pool Other useful stuff: forgot your rain jacket: Iceland has two outdoor clothing chains 66°N is for foufou’s who like to stare at you grumpily from lots of advertisings, Cintamani is worn by everybody else… as far as I recall both have stores on laugarvegur For last minute reading material: Eymundsson. (Austurstræti 18) has you covered. For maps the Iðnu bookstore (Brautarholt 8) has more variety than you could wish for Stages of subglacial volcanic eruptions jpg geo_map.jpg OK, your guides are ready for you. Some Icelandic letters and sounds æ – sound like “eye” ð – th sound as in thought þ – also th sound as in thought ll – sounds like tl á – ow í- ehv – like qu but with out rounding lips Some useful Icelandic phrases: Hello – Hállo; Goðan Daginn (to a man pronc. gothan dagin) Goðan Dag (to a woman) (Komdu) Sæll (to a man; pronc. sike) (Komdu) Sæl (to a woman; pronc. sigh) Yes – Já (pronc. yaow) No – Nei (pronc. Nay) Thanks – Tak fyrir Goodbye - Bless How are you – Hvað segirðu gott? (lit. What do you say?; pronc. cairth sergooth Gott) I’m good – Allt gott What’s your name? Hvað heiti þú ? (pronc. - cairth hetti thoo) My name is…- Ég heiti… (pronc. - Yeah heiti) Talar þú Íslenskur (Do you speak Icelandic?) Do you speak English? Talar Þú ensku? Yes, I speak English. Já, ég tala ensku. One hotdog with everything – (you’ll want one…maybe more!) Eina pylsa með öllu (Enna peel-sa meth oot-lu) Where does the bus stop? – Hvar stoppar rútan? Numbers: 1- Einn (en) 2-Tveir (t’vace) 3- þrír (three’sh) roll the r 4- fjórir (f’your’ish) roll the r 5- Fimm 6- Sex 7- sjö (sea’or) with rounded lips 8- Átta (Outta) 9- Níu (knee-yuh) 10-Tíu (tee-yuh) 11 – Ellefu (Et-le-fu) 12 – Tólf 13 – þrettán (thray-town) roll the r 14- Fjórtán (f’your’town) roll the r 15- Fimmtán (fimm-town) 16- Sextán (sex-town) 17 –Sautján (soy-t’yown) 18 – Átján (ow-t’yown) 19- Nítján (knee-t’yown) 20-Tuttugu (Too-ta-goo) Zero – Núll (Nool) Hundred – hundrað (hoon-drath) roll the r thousand – þúsund (thoo-sund) Some vocabulary: Iceland – Ísland Icelandic – Íslenskur key – lykill (lee-kilt) city bus – stræto coach bus – rúta coffee – kaffi milk – mjólk water – vatn beer - bjór and – og; it - það not - ekki hungry – svangur cost - kosta trail –gata road – vegur hike - ganga hotspring – laug mountain – fjall (fiat) glacier – jökull (yo-kut) waterfall – foss lake –vatn lava – hraun volcano – eldfjall today – í dag tomorrow – á morgun yesterday –í gær what – hvað; where – hvar; who - hver he – hann; she – hún rain – rigning (n), rigna (v); snow – snjór (n) snjóa (v) Time: What time is it? – Hvað er klukkan Klukkan er…… 1:00 – eitt (ate) 2:00- tvö (t’vuh) 3:00 – þrjú (thre-oh) roll the r 4:00- fjögur (fee-or-guth) roll the r 5 to 12 same as normal numbers 1:15 – korter yfir eitt 1:30 – hálf tvö 1:40 – tuttugu mínútur í tvö 1:45 – korter í tvö


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