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ESD methods: DIALOGUE MAPPING Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Protected Areas and Biosphere Reserves Amfissa, Greece Prof. Dr. Roberto Biloslavo,

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Presentation on theme: "ESD methods: DIALOGUE MAPPING Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Protected Areas and Biosphere Reserves Amfissa, Greece Prof. Dr. Roberto Biloslavo,"— Presentation transcript:

1 ESD methods: DIALOGUE MAPPING Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in Protected Areas and Biosphere Reserves Amfissa, Greece Prof. Dr. Roberto Biloslavo, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management, Slovenia

2 About myself 2 Prof. of Management University of Primorska, Faculty of Management (Slovenia) Research areas: management, strategic management, sustainable development, wisdom & leadership co-author of „Management of Sustainable Development“ – Msc. programme

3 Time schedule – Theoretical Introduction – Presentation of Dialogue Mapping by use of Compendium software (free available) – Work in groups (3 cases of interests/ group, design of possible solution by use of DM for the most worthy) – Presentations (20 min presentation, 5 min discussion)

4 4 Collective intelligence and forces of fragmetation Collective inteligence = the creativity and resourcefulness that a group or team can bring to a complex and novel problem Forces of fragmentation = support conditions in which the people involved see themselves as more separated than united, and in which information and knowledge are chaotic and scattered Fragmentation = Wickedness x Social Complexity

5 5 Opportunity-driven problem solving Time Problem Solution Gather data Analyze data Formulate solution Implement solution Figure 1: The „waterfall“ The waterfall is a picture of already knowing – you already know about the problem and its domain, you know about the right process and tools to solve it, and you know what a solution will look like

6 6 Opportunity-driven problem solving Figure 2: The „jagged“ line Time Problem Solution Gather data Analyze data Formulate solution Implement solution The jagged line of opportunity-driven problem solving is a picture of learning

7 7 Wicked problems Any problem is a nail problem if I have only a hammer 1You don’t understand the problem until you have developed solution Every solution exposes new aspects of the problem 2Wicked problems have no stopping ruleNo-definitive solution 3Solutions to wicked problems are not right or wrong Solution quality is not objective or based on formula 4Every wicked problem is essentially unique and novel Solutins need to be custom designed and fitted 5Every solution to a wicked problem is a „one- shot“ operation You can’t learn about the problem without trying solutions 6Wicked problems have no given alternative solutions You need creativity to devise solutions, and judgment to determine which is valid A problem doesn’t have to possess all six characteristics in order to be wicked!

8 8 Tame problems 1Has a well defined and stable problem statement 2Has a definite stopping point (i.e. when solution is reached) 3Has s solution that can be objectively evaluated as right or wrong 4Belongs to a class of similar problems that are solved in the same similar way 5Has solutions that can be easily tried and abandoned 6Comes with a limited set of alternative solutions

9 9 How we cope with wicked problems 1Lock down the problem definitionDescibe it in a way that you can solve it or split it in a sub-problem and declare that to be a PROBLEM 2Assert that the problem is solved 3Specify objective parameters by which to measure the solution’s success What is measured becomes the problem 4Cast the problem as „just like“ a previous problem that has been solved Ignore or filter out evidences that do not fit 5Give up on trying to get a good solution to the problem Just follow orders, do your job 6Declare that there are just a few possible solutions, and focus on selecting one of them Two approaches: 1. Studying the problem; 2. Taming it

10 10 Social complexity If not being included in the thinking and decision-making process members of the social network may seek to undermine or even sabotage the project if their needs are not considered Social complexity is a function of the number and diversity of players who are involved in a project „We all pretty much think and act the same way“ doesn’t hold anymore People have: different jagged line, different ideas about the problem, and what the criteria for success are

11 11 Social complexity Time Problem Solution Gather data Analyze data Formulate solution Implement solution AB

12 12 Shared understanding and share commitment Because of social complexity, solving a wicked problem is fundamentally a SOCIAL process The Holy Grail of effective collaboration: creating shared understanding about the problem, and shared commitment to the possible solution Shared understading does NOT mean necessarily an agreement Shared understading means that the stakeholders understand each other’s positions well enough to have intelligent dialogoue about the different interpretations of the problem Shared understading focuses on where we are, shared commitment focuses on where we’re going Design polarity = What ought to be vs. What can be done

13 13 Elements of dialogue mapping 1.Display – shared display medium such as a computer projector, flipchart paper, or a whiteboard 2.Notation – a grammar or method that provides the „rules“ for how the content is to be structured in the display medium 3.Mapping - a person skilled in capturing group interactions in the display according to the notation

14 14 Dialogue mapper 1.Actively listen to the conversation 2.Summarize the conversational moves in the collaborative display using the IBIS argumentation structure 3.Incrementally validate the map so that group members accept and own the map as a faithful representation of their thinking

15 15 IBIS notation ? – maps generally starts with Questions like „What should we do about X?“ - the response to a question is an Idea. Ideas respond to one and only one Question. and Pros and Cons

16 16 IBIS notation without computer - sample What should our mission statement be? Legendary service Best performance Committed to being a green company, contributing to society Too vague Simple, easy to remember Warning: Maps don’t always grow left to right – sometimes ideas hang out for a while, waiting for their Question to become clear

17 17 Question Types 1.Deontic questions:“What should we do?“ 2.Instrumental questions:“How should we do it?“ 3.Criterial questions:“What are the criteria?“ 4.Meaning or Conceptual questions:“What does X mean?“ 5.Factual questions:“What is X?“ or „Is X true?“ 6.Stakeholder questions:“Who are the stakeholders?“ or „Who cares about the outcome?“

18 18 Checklist for decision making 1.Ask all the key questions 2.Case making for key ideas 3.Case making against key ideas 4.Endorsements 5.Validation of criteria 6.Making the decision


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