Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

THE CHANGING FACE OF EDUCATION School-Based Professional Studies Programme Spring Term SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES GRADUATE SCHOOL.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "THE CHANGING FACE OF EDUCATION School-Based Professional Studies Programme Spring Term SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES GRADUATE SCHOOL."— Presentation transcript:

1 THE CHANGING FACE OF EDUCATION School-Based Professional Studies Programme Spring Term SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

2 History There were schools prior to the 19th century, but not many and mostly run by the church, with an emphasis on religious education Education had to be paid for in many cases, meaning that poor children could not benefit The 19th century saw more secular state-funded schools In 1870, the Elementary Education Act made attendance at school compulsory between the ages of 5 and 10 The Education Act of 1902 established Local Education Authorities to oversee schools (apart from independent schools) Extension of compulsory education to 14 year, and later 15 and 16 led to secondary schools National pay scales and conditions of service

3 Types of schools through history STATE-FUNDED SCHOOLS Primary Secondary: grammar (selective at age 11, by the 11+ exam) and Secondary Modern for those who weren’t selected From 1965, comprehensive schools – non-selective, though selective system still remained in some areas Also in some areas, a three-tier system of First (5 – 8), Middle (9 – 13) and Upper (14 – 18)

4 Types of schools through history INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS Fee-paying private schools, governed by an elected board of governors and independent of many of the regulations and conditions that apply to state funded schools Some of the older, more expensive and more exclusive schools catering for the 13–18 age-range in England and Wales are known, a bit confusingly, as Public schools There are around 2,500 independent schools in the UK, which educate around 615,000 children, being some 7 per cent of all British children and 18 per cent of pupils over the age of 16

5 The Role of the Local Authority From 1902 – 2010, most schools were in a Local [Education] Authority The LA has/had responsibility for funding, managing admissions, employment and dismissal of school staff, educational achievement and teacher professional development, and co-management of school premises

6 EDUCATION POLICY 1980s and 1990s Education Act 1988:  some element of parental choice  Local Management of Schools (financial autonomy)  the National Curriculum  Grant-maintained schools not under LA control 1991 – SATs introduced for KS1, and in 1995 for KS – League tables introduced for secondary schools; 1997 for primary schools Ofsted established

7 EDUCATION POLICY Literacy and Numeracy strategies Max class size for KS1 (30) Beacon Schools Advanced Skills Teachers Education Action Zones Education Maintenance Allowance for FE Every Child Matters ………… and lots more

8 EDUCATION POLICY 2010 onwards Increased numbers of schools opting out of - or being required to leave - Local Authority control and become academies Free schools Increasing autonomy for schools over curriculum and pay and conditions – academies and free schools do not have to employ qualified teachers and may vary from national pay scales, holidays etc.

9 EDUCATION POLICY 2010 onwards continued Performance-related pay Devolved funding Free school meals for all Foundation Stage and KS1 pupils New National Curriculum from Sept 2014 English Baccalaureate

10 Types of School Organisations - current FEDERATIONS Often several small primaries, but sometimes a combination of primary and secondary schools A variety of arrangements including:  All schools have own Head teacher, but share a governing body  One Head teacher for the federation, with heads of Teaching and Learning in each school

11 Types of School Organisations - current ACADEMIES AND ACADEMY CHAINS First academies were Ofsted ‘Outstanding’ schools Later extended to underperforming schools Outside LA system so receive funding which would have gone to LA to provide services, such as financial management, HR, legal advice BUT have to buy back or buy in those services either from LA or elsewhere Some ‘stand alone’ academies, but many belong to an sponsored academy chain: sponsors can include high-performing schools, universities, FE colleges or businesses

12 Types of School Organisations - current FREE SCHOOLS State funded, receiving funding directly from DfE and have priority for funds over other new schools Non-profit-making Set up by parents, teachers and academy chains in response to what local people say they need Can set their own pay and conditions for staff Can employ teachers without qualified teacher status Can determine their own admissions arrangements Can decide upon their own curriculum Can set the length of terms and school days Operate independently of the local authority In April 2014, there were 174 Free Schools

13 Types of School Organisations - current CO-OPERATIVE TRUSTS Maintained school(s) supported by a charitable foundation (often called the trust) Generally adopt co-operative model involving:  adopting co-operative values and principles  ensuring that the key stakeholders such as parents, staff, learners and members of the local community have a guaranteed 'say' in the affairs of the organisation.

14 Types of School Organisations - current TEACHING SCHOOLS Schools which meet certain requirements (e.g. Ofsted Outstanding, track record in school-to-school support etc.) can apply to become a Teaching School They are known as the Lead School (and there are joint lead schools arrangements as well) and encourage other schools to be part of the Teaching School Alliance The Teaching School Alliance's remit includes ITE, CPD, succession planning and leadership training, school-to- school support, recruiting and deploying specialist leaders in education (SLEs) and research and development They are supported by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) and have a newly formed Teaching School Council (2014)

15 ACCOUNTABILITY AND OFSTED Before 1992, inspections were carried out by inspectors based in Local Education Authorities who reported to the Secretary of State for Education Ofsted was established to overcome regional variations in judgements Inspection reports were published for anyone to read under the accountability agenda Later extended to cover day care and child- minding

16 SCHOOL GOVERNANCE 1 School Governing Bodies (GBs) are made up of Head teachers, representatives of teaching and support staff, parents and co-opted members of the community GB members are volunteers, i.e. unpaid GBs typically meet twice a term and many also have a committee system with committees (e.g. Finance, Personnel, Buildings) meeting once or twice a term

17 SCHOOL GOVERNANCE 2 They are responsible for making strategic decisions about the school, including: o setting policies and targets o setting and monitoring the budget o deciding staffing, including recruitment and, if necessary, redundancy, o managing the maintenance of the site and buildings


Download ppt "THE CHANGING FACE OF EDUCATION School-Based Professional Studies Programme Spring Term SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES GRADUATE SCHOOL."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google