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The Big Picture Strategies for Constructing Meaning Repeated Words/Synonyms.

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Presentation on theme: "The Big Picture Strategies for Constructing Meaning Repeated Words/Synonyms."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Big Picture Strategies for Constructing Meaning Repeated Words/Synonyms

2 Imaging Creates single- dimension multi- sensory or conceptual images Creates and organizes multi- sensory or conceptual images Evaluates images Combines imaging techniques Inferring Creates single type of inference Creates varied types of inferences Understand s continuum of inference Questioning Asks questions Asks, answers, and evaluates questions Adjusts answers to questions Asks a variety of questions Connecting Makes basic connections Makes multilevel connections Creates viable connections Focuses connections Nonfiction Summarizing Previews text Examines first and last sentences Uses repeated words and synonyms Categorizes similar words and details Notices transitions Combines summarizing techniques Analyzes text Fiction Summarizing Identifies plot Identifies theme Predicting Previews text Creates Predictions Monitors predictions Fluency * Uses correct phrasing * Uses appropriate expression. * Reads with accuracy * Reads at appropriate rate Vocabulary Acquisition * Selects unknown words * Creates meaning * Uses vocabulary acquisition devices * Monitors word selection

3 We will practice repeated words/synonyms with the following paragraph.

4 Step 1: Underline and try to derive meaning from the first/last sentences.

5 Denim companies were busily expanding around the world in the 1970s, but they weren’t welcome everywhere. In Communist countries such as the USSR, government officials saw blue jeans as a corrupting force. They believed that buying Western goods such as jeans and rock music records would lure young people away from Communism and toward capitalism. They also believed that popular culture promoted poor morals; tight fitting jeans were one more symbol of American corruption. Some politicians called the influx of Western goods and ideas a “plague.” They refused to allow Levi’s or Lee’s to be imported, and suggested that the government use propaganda to turn teens against denim. Posters or newspaper articles, for example, could inform teens that jeans were part of a misguided, money driven culture.

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7 Need further clarification? Step 2: Try repeated words and synonyms. Move your eye diagonally up and down the page. Since we introduced the concept of world in the first sentence, let’s be mindful of words and phrases that are similar or at least related to this word.

8 Denim companies were busily expanding around the world in the 1970s, but they weren’t welcome everywhere. In Communist countries such as the USSR, government officials saw blue jeans as a corrupting force. They believed that buying Western goods such as jeans and rock music records would lure young people away from Communism and toward capitalism. They also believed that popular culture promoted poor morals; tight fitting jeans were one more symbol of American corruption. Some politicians called the influx of Western goods and ideas a “plague.” They refused to allow Levi’s or Lee’s to be imported, and suggested that the government use propaganda to turn teens against denim. Posters or newspaper articles, for example, could inform teens that jeans were part of a misguided, money driven culture.

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10 Did your eye automatically take in entire phrases?

11 Denim companies were busily expanding around the world in the 1970s, but they weren’t welcome everywhere. In Communist countries such as the USSR, government officials saw blue jeans as a corrupting force. They believed that buying Western goods such as jeans and rock music records would lure young people away from Communism and toward capitalism. They also believed that popular culture promoted poor morals; tight fitting jeans were one more symbol of American corruption. Some politicians called the influx of Western goods and ideas a “plague.” They refused to allow Levi’s or Lee’s to be imported, and suggested that the government use propaganda to turn teens against denim. Posters or newspaper articles, for example, could inform teens that jeans were part of a misguided, money driven culture.

12 Write a phrase in the margin that describes what we know so far.

13 Okay, so Communist governments considered US (jeans?) corrupting. Now, move diagonally up and down the page again looking for words that might relate to corruption and/or morals.

14 Denim companies were busily expanding around the world in the 1970s, but they weren’t welcome everywhere. In Communist countries such as the USSR, government officials saw blue jeans as a corrupting force. They believed that buying Western goods such as jeans and rock music records would lure young people away from Communism and toward capitalism. They also believed that popular culture promoted poor morals; tight fitting jeans were one more symbol of American corruption. Some politicians called the influx of Western goods and ideas a “plague.” They refused to allow Levi’s or Lee’s to be imported, and suggested that the government use propaganda to turn teens against denim. Posters or newspaper articles, for example, could inform teens that jeans were part of a misguided, money driven culture.

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16 What phrases did you take in this time?

17 Denim companies were busily expanding around the world in the 1970s, but they weren’t welcome everywhere. In Communist countries such as the USSR, government officials saw blue jeans as a corrupting force. They believed that buying Western goods such as jeans and rock music records would lure young people away from Communism and toward capitalism. They also believed that popular culture promoted poor morals; tight fitting jeans were one more symbol of American corruption. Some politicians called the influx of Western goods and ideas a “plague.” They refused to allow Levi’s or Lee’s to be imported, and suggested that the government use propaganda to turn teens against denim. Posters or newspaper articles, for example, could inform teens that jeans were part of a misguided, money driven culture.

18 Write a phrase in the margin that describes what we know now.

19 Can you answer this question?

20 According to the author, how would the Communist government of the 1970s respond to the importation of the IPod from the US into the USSR? The Soviet government would… A.encourage the importation of IPods because it would increase the demand for goods and services. B.encourage the importation of IPods because they could be used for propaganda purposes. C.discourage the importation of IPods because it would increase the trade deficit. D.discourage the importation of IPods because it would promote American immorality and capitalism.

21 According to the author, how would the Communist government of the 1970s respond to the importation of the IPod from the US into the USSR? The Soviet government would… A.encourage the importation of IPods because it would increase the demand for goods and services. B.encourage the importation of IPods because they could be used for propaganda purposes. C.discourage the importation of IPods because it would increase the trade deficit. D.discourage the importation of IPods because it would promote American immorality and capitalism. Page 48, paragraph 7

22 Taking It From the Top

23 Summarizing Strategy Tap into prior knowledge: Vocabulary development, personal accounts Preview Text: –Read all captions, subheadings, and sidebars –Quickly number paragraphs –Make sure that you read the questions at the end of the chapter Summarizing Strategies –If the paragraph is introductory, skip it. –Try first/last sentence. (Write key points in the margin). –If necessary, try repeated words, synonyms. (Write key points in the margin.

24 Timeline October –Teach repeated words/synonyms strategy to students using the template provided –Teach students to preview, first/last sentence, repeated words/synonyms using smart summarizer template Turn survey, reading assignment and repeated words/synonyms template in to your department chair by Oct. 30 Department chairs will review and forward results to Beth Smith or Connie Schroeder.


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