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Developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 2011 OECD-JAPAN SEMINAR: TDA APPROACHES TO IMPROVING TEACHER TRAINING DR MICHAEL DAY.

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Presentation on theme: "Developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 2011 OECD-JAPAN SEMINAR: TDA APPROACHES TO IMPROVING TEACHER TRAINING DR MICHAEL DAY."— Presentation transcript:

1 developing people, improving young lives NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 2011 OECD-JAPAN SEMINAR: TDA APPROACHES TO IMPROVING TEACHER TRAINING DR MICHAEL DAY

2 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Overview of English teacher training system Around 40,000 teachers trained every year Around 200 accredited providers of teacher training, ranging from large university departments providing thousands of places, to groups of schools providing tens of places Total budget of £512m of which around half covers fees for training paid to providers and the other half covers support for trainees paid in bursaries and salary subsidies All providers inspected by Ofsted on a three year rolling cycle Providers responsible for recruiting trainees onto courses, but TDA responsible for national marketing and recruitment activities to support providers

3 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Overview - routes into teaching Three main routes into teaching – Undergraduate – mainly for primary teachers, provided by universities, 3 or 4 year courses – – Postgraduate – for about three quarters of secondary, and about half primary teachers. Mostly leads to PGCE as well as QTS. Mainly provided by universities, but also by School Centred Initial Training Providers (SCITTs) – accredited partnerships of schools, often with an HEI in the partnership – Employment Based – for about a quarter of secondary, and smaller proportion of primary. Provided by Employment Based Initial Teacher Training providers (EBITTs) – accredited partnerships of schools, often led by HEIs or with an HEI in the partnership. Two main types GTP – Graduate Teacher Programme. Involves studying for QTS while working as unqualified teacher in school for a year Teach First – niche programme for high-flyers to study for QTS, at end of first year, while working on a two year programme in a challenging school.

4 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 1994 – TTA created Creation of TTA in 1994 marked major tightening of control over ITT Main functions: – Funding of ITT courses – Accreditation of providers of ITT, including new school based providers (SCITTs) – Research to improve quality of ITT Also Ofsted given powers to inspect all ITT, including that provided by universities –

5 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED TTA – creation of market to drive up quality TTA established market management system to drive up quality, based on – Fixed price for each teacher training place – Creation of quality categories for each ITT course, based on Ofsted inspection data – Awarding ITT places (and hence funding) to providers based on the quality categories of their courses – Having clear rules to allow TTA to remove places from poorer quality providers and award them to higher quality providers Still the main mechanism for awarding places and driving up quality. National demographic changes, which feed through to the numbers of places to be funded each year, has led to frequent increases and decreases in the total number of places to be awarded

6 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Improvements in ITT course quality Primary ITT Places graded as very good 14%51% Places graded as good53%48% Places graded as satisfactory 30%0% Secondary ITT Places graded as very good 13%54% Places graded as good55%42% Places graded as satisfactory 27%4%

7 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Increasing numbers of newly qualified teachers are rating their training in key areas as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ % of primary NQTs rating phonics training as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ % of primary NQTs rating ECM training as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ 7 % of secondary NQTs rating training in SEN as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ % of secondary NQTs rating ECM training as ‘good’ or ‘very good’  Primary NQTs rating their overall training provision as ‘good’ or ‘very good’: 85%  Secondary NQTs rating their overall training provision as ‘good’ or ‘very good’: 86%  Primary NQTs rating their overall training provision as ‘good’ or ‘very good’: 85%  Secondary NQTs rating their overall training provision as ‘good’ or ‘very good’: 86%

8 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Tackling Teacher Shortages 2000 onwards Increasing emphasis on recruitment role to solve teacher shortage problems Employing specialist advertising and marketing agencies to undertake substantial market research – segmenting the market and targeting marketing material at the segments Introduced financial incentives to trainees to enter training and provide some support Major focus on recruiting ‘career finders’ and ‘career changers’

9 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Strong recruitment to ITT is vital to replace the one in ten teachers leaving the profession early as well as retirees Outflow: 9% Retirements 10,300 (2%) Out of maintained sector 28,500 (7%) Teachers in service (headcount, March 2006) 436,700 Inflow: 10% Newly qualified 25,100 (6%) New to maintained sector 10,400 (2%) Returned to maintained sector 9,000 (2%) The flow of teachers into the profession to replace those who leave is reliant on NQTs. Currently, inflow and outflow are broadly in balance: Inflow = 10% Outflow = 9% The flow of teachers into the profession to replace those who leave is reliant on NQTs. Currently, inflow and outflow are broadly in balance: Inflow = 10% Outflow = 9% Some return at a later date 9

10 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Increasing the pool of potential mathematics, physics and chemistry teachers TDA’s measures to increase the pool of potential teachers of these subjects include: Conducting sophisticated market research to target recruitment messages to science and mathematics graduates, leading to highly successful advertising and direct marketing (including TV) campaigns. Creating a range of enhancement courses in physics and chemistry at universities to prepare graduates from various mathematics and science backgrounds – engineers, economists, oceanographers, geologists – to train as mathematics, physics and chemistry teachers. This creates a much larger pool from which to recruit science teachers – of the graduates of STEM subjects emerging from English universities in 2006, only 8% were chemists and 6% physicists, while 22% were other physical scientists, and 64% engineers. Moving from fixed length classroom based courses to more tailored courses, and on- line courses for those studying whilst in work. This has made these courses more attractive and the majority of physics teachers are now recruited through them.

11 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Increasing the pool of potential mathematics, physics and chemistry teachers (cont) Offering a range of campus activities to encourage students to consider teaching, including opportunities to visit and work in schools part time. Offering larger student bursaries (GBP 9 000) and other financial incentives for mathematics, physics and chemistry trainees. Targeting career changers by offering employment as unqualified teachers while training, and by working closely with high tech companies to recruit staff looking for new careers. The age profile of those entering teaching reflects the success of this strategy with over half of trainee teachers now over 25. Launching a series of in-service conversion courses for existing mathematics, physics and chemistry teachers who lack appropriate qualifications in those subjects.

12 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Subject enhancement courses allow us to target graduates with physics and chemistry related degrees, increasing the recruitment pool and potential quality 37,  To meet our targets in the Science and Innovation Investment Framework we would need to recruit more than 1 in 5 graduates (21%) in chemistry and physics each year.  By targeting graduates in related subjects and using enhancement courses to update their knowledge, we need to recruit 1 in 33 (3%).  To meet our targets in the Science and Innovation Investment Framework we would need to recruit more than 1 in 5 graduates (21%) in chemistry and physics each year.  By targeting graduates in related subjects and using enhancement courses to update their knowledge, we need to recruit 1 in 33 (3%). This larger recruitment pool gives us access to more high quality 1st, 2:1 and higher degree holders

13 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

14 Recruitment to Maths against target

15 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Relationship GTP growth to teacher recruitment

16 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED New Approaches - Methods of Measuring Components of Effective Teaching Effective Teaching Professional Disposition Pedagogical Skills Knowledge School leaving quals Degree Knowledge Curriculum knowledge Micro teaching Situational Judgement tests Creativity Communication Skills Teamwork Resilience Ethics and Integrity

17 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED New Approaches – building the brand of teaching to attract high fliers Career qualities Variety ? Responsibility ✖ Leadership ?? Travel ✖ ? Good salary ✖ ? Security ? Meaningful ? Making a difference ?? Challenge Dynamic/exciting ? Interactive ? Type 1 Gauche Academics Type 2 Hard working achievers Type 3 Ambitious and assured

18 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Market testing : Characteristics of those expecting/achieved 1 st Class Hons Degrees Consumed by / expert in their subject area Science and research biased Very likely to go on to further study Want to stay / work in academia More confident of achieving a 1 st Type 1 Gauche academics Majority of sample Academically capable – but driven to work hard more by fear of failure Mixed state and independent sector educations Self-effacing - typically ‘surprised’ by success (wouldn’t have predicted a 1 st ) Not all clear what to do next – more options than had expected Not all keen to go on to further study – keen to earn money/pay off debts; want break from hard study Not all thought about / ready to be leaders Academic achievement expected from young age Often more privileged background – more likely to be privately educated Confident, self-possessed More likely to believe they will/would get a 1 st More likely to have a life plan - keen to get a well-paid or rewarding job Confident and seeking early leadership opportunities Type 3 Ambitious and assured Type 2 Hard working achievers

19 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Professional Development is about acquiring and testing the knowledge base for teaching doing understanding competent incompetent consciousunconscious conscious competence unconsious incompetence From „unconscious incompetence“ to „conscious competence“

20 NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED Developing and deepening the teacher’s body of knowledge through working with others, research and enquiry


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