Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Electronics Safety, It’s for All of Us Copyright © Texas Education Agency, 2013. All rights reserved.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Electronics Safety, It’s for All of Us Copyright © Texas Education Agency, 2013. All rights reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 1 Electronics Safety, It’s for All of Us Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

3 2 Safety Slide Overview Terms and definitions Types of electrical injuries Facts about electrical shock Treating a victim of electrical shock Types of fires Types of fire extinguishers and their uses Hazard labels General lab safety rules Personal safety rules Hand tool safety precautions Power tool safety precautions Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

4 3 Terms and Definitions Safety- t he state of being free from danger, personal risk, or injury Accident- a ny unplanned event, occurring suddenly, which causes personal injury or damage to property First aid- i mmediate care given to an accident or shock victim until medical help arrives Electrical shock- t he jolt a person experiences when electrical current passes through a part of the body Note- Electrical shock can cause serious burns and muscle damage, and can kill a victim by stopping the heart or breathing or both. Electrical conductive materials- materials through which electricity flows easily Examples- Copper, silver, gold, aluminum Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

5 4 Terms and Definitions (continued) Electrical insulating materials- materials through which electrical current cannot flow easily Examples- rubber, cotton, wood, fiber glass, plastic Electrical circuits- the system of wires and cables that carry electricity to motors, appliances, heating elements and other devices which operate by means of electricity Overloaded circuit- an electrical circuit that is drawing more electrical current than it is design to handle Electrical outlet adapter- an electrical plug that is installed into an electrical outlet to permit two or more electrical connections to the outlet (outlet strip) Note- The adapter is called an “octopus” outlet if enough cables are attached to make the outlet look like a many-armed octopus. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

6 5 Terms and Definitions (continued) Fuse- a device that opens the circuit (“burns out”) when the circuit is overloaded Circuit breaker - a device that automatically opens the circuit like a switch if too much current is being drawn Smoke alarm- a device that senses smoke and gives off a shrill sound to alert people in the area that a fire may be starting Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

7 Four Main Types of Electrical Injuries Electrocution (death due to electrical shock) Electrical shock Burns Falls - Electricity is one of the most common causes of fires and thermal burns in homes and workplaces. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

8 Common Sense You will receive an electrical shock if a part of your body completes an electrical circuit by: touching a live wire and an electrical ground, or touching a live wire and another wire at a different voltage. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

9 8 Hazards of Working with Electrical and Electronic Equipment Electrical shock Note- Electrical shock can occur if the body contacts an electrical circuit or is struck by lightning. Electrical burns Note- Electrical burns can occur if the body contacts an electrical circuit or is struck by lightning or if the body is exposed to radio- frequency waves, X-rays, or other forms of radiation. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

10 9 Hazards of Working with Electrical & Electronic Equipment (continued) Electrical fires Note- Electrical fires can occur if electrical wires become heated because of an overloaded circuit and contact flammable materials. Injury from misuse of tools Note- Body injuries can be caused by improper use of tools. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

11 10 Facts about Electrical Shock Current is what causes muscle contraction, burns, and pain. Current is caused by voltage. Higher voltage is more dangerous than low voltage, but current kills. AC causes the heart to fibrillate at lower voltage than DC. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

12 The danger from electrical shock depends on: the amount of the shocking current through the body, the duration of the shocking current through the body, and the path of the shocking current through the body. 11 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. Facts about Electrical Shock (continued)

13 12 Treating a Victim of Electrical Shock 1. Shut off the electrical current if the victim is still in contact with the energized circuit. 2. While you do this, have someone else call for help. 3. If you cannot get to the switchgear quickly, pry the victim from the circuit with something that does not conduct electricity such as dry wood. 4. Do not touch the victim yourself if he or she is still in contact with an electrical circuit! You do not want to be a victim too! Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

14 13 Treating a Victim of Electrical Shock (continued) 1. Learn first aid and CPR! 2. Check victim’s breathing and heartbeat. 3. Administer first aid for shock and burns as necessary. 4. Do not leave the victim unless there is absolutely no other option. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

15 14 Types of Fires Fire extinguishers are classified to indicate their ability to handle specific classes and sizes of fires. Labels on extinguishers indicate the class and relative size of fire that they can be expected to handle. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

16 15 Types of Fire Extinguishers & Uses Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

17 16 Types of Fires (continued) Solid, organic material Most common type of fire Easiest to fight By removing heat, oxygen, or fuel Combustible liquid or gas Water should never be used It can spread the fire Smother with CO 2 or foam Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

18 17 Types of Fires (continued) Involve potentially energized electrical equipment Can be a serious hazard to firefighters Water conducts electricity Magnesium and titanium fires are common Some metals burn when contacted with air or water Example: sodium Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

19 P-A-S-S The steps for using a fire extinguisher are to: Pull the pin; Aim the nozzle; Squeeze the trigger; and Sweep extinguisher back and forth over the fire. However, do not try to put out fires unless you have received proper training. If you are not trained, the best thing you can do is evacuate. 18 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

20 19 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved. Hazard Labels

21 20 Hazard Labels Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

22 21 Hazard Labels Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

23 22 Hazard Labels Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

24 UNT in partnership with TEA. Copyright ©. All rights reserved. 23 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

25 24 Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

26 25 General Lab Safety Rules Keep all hand tools clean and in safe, working order. Report any defective tools, test equipment, or other equipment to the teacher. Do not remove any devices, [i.e. ground straps, switch covers, etc.] without the permission of the teacher. Do not operate or energize any circuit that could be hazardous without first receiving instruction on how to do so safely. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

27 26 General Lab Safety Rules (continued) Report all accidents to the teacher regardless of nature or severity. Turn off power before leaving test equipment or circuits being worked on. Do not use any solvent without first determining its properties and how to use it safely. Keep the laboratory floor clean of scraps and litter. Clean up any spilled liquids immediately. Store all cleaning rags in metal cans or containers. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

28 27 Personal Safety Rules When working on or near rotating machinery, secure loose clothing and tie hair (if long). Isolate line (power) voltages from ground by means of isolation transformers. Check all line (power) cords before using for brittle or cracked insulation. Do not use if damaged and report to the teacher. When measuring voltages with a meter and test probes, be careful not to connect yourself to a voltage of any value. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

29 28 Personal Safety Rules (continued) Be certain that floor is isolated either by tile, rubber mat, or by wearing rubber sole shoes. When measuring voltages expected to be greater than 30 volts, turn off or disconnect the live circuit before connecting test equipment. It is recommended that only equipment with a polarized (three prong) plug be used. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

30 29 Personal Safety Rules (continued) Do not defeat the purpose of any safety device such as fuse, circuit breakers, or interlocks. Shorting across these devices could cause excessive current flow which might destroy or seriously damage equipment being worked on, as well as cause a fire. Do not carry sharp-edged or pointed tools in your pockets. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

31 30 Personal Safety Rules (continued) Do not indulge in horseplay or play practical jokes in any lab. Wear gloves and goggles when required. Do not wear rings or jewelry when working with mechanical or electrical devices. Exercise good judgment and common sense. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

32 31 Hand Tool Safety Precautions 1. Keep tools in proper working order. 2. Always put a handle on a file when using it. 3. Use caution with your soldering iron or gun; they can burn and cause fires. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

33 32 Hand Tool Safety Precautions (continued) 4. Exercise care in using long nose pliers and diagonal cutters; they can pinch and cut. 5. Do not use long nose pliers as a wrench. 6. Ease up on the pressure just before a hacksaw completes its cut. 7. Be sure hammer heads and screwdriver blades are fastened tightly in their handles. 8. Use safety glasses or goggles when soldering or unsoldering. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

34 33 Power Tool Safety Precautions Note- Power tools usually operate on 120 volts. This voltage can cause serious shock, burns, and under certain conditions, death. Always check the power tool before you use it. Be sure the cord is in good condition and that the plug and switch are not broken. Keep the cord clear of the work. Be sure your hands are dry before using electric tools. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

35 34 Power Tool Safety Precautions (continued) When drilling, use a sharp drill bit; pressure on a dull drill bit can cause an accident. Securely fasten the work being drilled. Note- The drill can turn both the bit and the work, which can cause an injury. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

36 35 Power Tool Safety Precautions (continued) Keep power tool guards in place; they are for your protection. Operate power tools only after you have had instruction in their uses. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

37 36 Power Tool Safety Precautions (continued) Wear safety goggles or glasses when operating power tools. Note- Flying chips can cause permanent damage to your eyes. Power cords and switches should be checked before using a power tool. Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.

38 37 Presentation Summary Terms and definitions Types of electrical injuries Facts about electrical shock Treating a victim of electrical shock Types of fires Types of fire extinguishers and their uses Hazard labels General lab safety rules Personal safety rules Hand tool safety precautions Power tool safety precautions LIVE SAFE – BE SAFE Copyright © Texas Education Agency, All rights reserved.


Download ppt "1 Electronics Safety, It’s for All of Us Copyright © Texas Education Agency, 2013. All rights reserved."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google