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Teacher Effectiveness October 10 & 11, Facilitators: Betsy A

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1 Teacher Effectiveness October 10 & 11, 2013. Facilitators: Betsy A
Teacher Effectiveness October 10 & 11, Facilitators: Betsy A. Baker, Ed.D. Susan J. Bickford, Ph.D.

2 Our Agenda Overview of Educator Effectiveness
Making Connections to the Observation & Practice Aspect of Teacher Effectiveness A Closer Look at The Framework for Teaching The Four Domains Five Rules for Supervision & Evaluation The Steps in the Formal Observation Process Understanding of the Relationship Between Observation and Evaluation Suggestions for Further Growth, Practice, & Support Show: Slide with today’s agenda. Let participants read silently (30 sec)

3 Overview of Educator Effectiveness

4 Project Development - Goal
To develop a teacher effectiveness model that: reforms the way we evaluate teachers identifies critical components of teacher training and professional growth

5 Project Development - Background
$800,000 Gates Foundation grant to facilitate the development of statewide policy, tools and processes to evaluate teachers and principals in which student achievement is a significant factor affecting performance ratings PDE is closely following the work of the Pittsburgh Public Schools – PPS recipients of $40 million Gates Foundation grant that is more comprehensive in scope but similar in redesigning evaluation policy, tools and processes

6 2010-2011 Pilot I Sites 2011-2012 Phase II Sites
Allentown School District Cornell School District Mohawk School District IU5 – Northwest Tri-County Phase II Sites 102 Pilot II LEA Sites Moshannon Valley Area School District West Branch Area School District State College Area School District Bellefonte Area School District Phase III Sites Bald Eagle Curwensville Area Glendale Harmony Area Moshannon Valley Penns Valley Area Central Intermediate Unit # 10 Keystone Central School District Philipsburg-Osceola School District

7 Principal Effectiveness System in Act 82 of 2012
Effective SY Observation/ Evidence Domains Strategic/Cultural Leadership Systems Leadership Leadership for Learning Professional and Community Leadership Building Level Data Indicators of Academic Achievement Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, All Students Indicators of Closing the Achievement Gap, Subgroups Academic Growth PVAAS Other Academic Indicators Credit for Advanced Achievement Correlation Data Based on Teacher Level Measures PVAAS Elective Data/SLOs District Designed Measures and Examinations Nationally Recognized Standardized Tests Industry Certification Examinations Student Projects Pursuant to Local Requirements Student Portfolios Pursuant to Local Requirements

8 Teachers Without Eligible PVAAS Score

9 Teachers with Eligible PVAAS Score

10 Non Teaching Professional Employee
Effectiveness System in Act 82 of 2012 Effective SY Observation/Evidence Danielson Framework Domains Planning and Preparation Educational Environment Delivery of Service Professional Development Student Performance of All Students in the School Building in which the Nonteaching Professional Employee is Employed District Designed Measures and Examinations Nationally Recognized Standardized Tests Industry Certification Examinations Student Projects Pursuant to Local Requirements Student Portfolios Pursuant to Local Requirements

11 Educational Specialists CSPG #75-81
Dental Hygienist Elementary School Counselor Home and School Visitor Instructional Technology Specialist Secondary School Counselor School Nurse School Psychologist

12 Licensed Professionals?
Not Under the Authority of PDE Use of Non-Teaching Instrument Will Be a Local Decision for the Following: Occupational Therapist Physical Therapist Social Workers Behavior Specialists

13 Teachers with Unique Roles & Functions
Gifted Teachers Special Education Teachers ESL Teachers Reading Specialists Early Childhood & Early Intervention Teachers Career Technology Education Teachers Speech Language Pathologists School Librarians

14 Teaching vs. Non-Teaching Professionals
To be considered a teaching professional, you must be able to answer yes to the following two questions: Are you working under your instructional certification? Do you provide direct instruction to students in a particular subject area or grade level?

15 Danielson Rubric 2007, 2011, 2013 Applies to all teachers, including teachers with unique roles and functions SAS site provides EXAMPLES, not unique rubrics for teacher with unique roles and function

16 EXAMPLES for Teachers with Unique Roles and Functions

17 PDE 82-1 Classroom Teacher Rating Tool

18 Rating Teacher Effectiveness
Teacher Observation and Practice = 50% Domain 1 Domain 2 Domain 3 Domain 4 Multiple Measures of Student Performance = 50% Building Level Score (SPP) = 15% Teacher Specific Rating (ex. PVAAS) = 0-15% Elective Rating (SLOs) = 35-20% For 85% Observation & 15% SPP 18

19 50% Teacher Observation and Practice
1 50% Teacher Observation and Practice = 85% Pre-Observation – Domain 1 and 4 The goal is for the teacher to be Distinguished in Domain I, Planning and Prep. 2 days before: Teacher provides evidence using Lesson Plan Form Teacher and Evaluator discuss evidence provided; Evaluator Collects additional Evidence through Questioning During the Observation – Domains 1, 2 and 3 Evaluator arrives early – Walks the Walls Evaluator provides Teacher with Evidence Collected during the Observation Evidence Collected during the lesson: Avoid Opinions Preparing for Post-Observation – Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4 Teacher self-assesses using highlighter and rubric –and gives to evaluator (No need to discuss the areas of agreement; plan to talk about the areas of concern only) Evaluator assesses and marks all agreed upon – leaves areas of concern blank to discuss Post-Teaching Collaborative Assessment – Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4 Teacher and Evaluator discuss agreed upon items Evaluator invites teacher to discuss areas of disagreement Teacher develops self-assessment summary

20 15% Building Level Data (SPP) Effective 2013-14

21 0-15% Teacher Specific Data Effective 2015-16
3 Teacher value-added reports for individual teachers by grade/subject/year using a robust statistical report. Teacher diagnostic reports for insight on effectiveness with students by achievement level and subgroup. Administrator summary reports for authorized users in a particular school or district. Drill down capacity to individual student-level projections based on classroom rosters. Teacher-level value-added reports require student-teacher linkages, which capture the instructor(s) responsible for a student’s learning in the tested grade/subject. It is critical that this linkage system provide accurate information that is validated by individual teachers. Web-based teacher reporting for PSSA grades 4-8 and Keystone Exams

22 4 20-35% Teacher Elective Data
Student Learning Objective (SLO) Effective SLO is a process to document a measure of Educator Effectiveness based on student achievement of content standards. SLOs are a part of PA’s multiple-measure, comprehensive system of Educator Effectiveness authorized by Act 82. COMPONENTS: Classroom Context SLO Goal Performance Indicators (PI) Performance Measures (PM) Teacher Expectations

23 Observation and Practice Aspect of the Teacher Effectiveness System
Making Connections to the Observation and Practice Aspect of the Teacher Effectiveness System

24 Observation and Practice
Danielson’s Framework for Teacher Effectiveness Model -or- Differentiated Supervision

25 Formative Assessment How much do we really know about the Danielson Model? Agree or Disagree Give the participants the AGREE or DISAGREE as a pre-test and complete the LEADERSHIP INVENTORY to gauge your effectiveness as a team.

26 Having an Impact If we want to impact student achievement and growth…
Then we must impact teaching and learning And of course, we know what good teaching is…or do we?

27 Wisdom of Practice Participant Materials Worksheet #1, Page 2
What are the qualities of teaching most tightly tied to student learning? minutes, total) The goal of this activity is to elicit what the audience knows about good teaching. In the subsequent activity, we will connect this schema to the research. Give Directions: Tell participants to work alone and list on the left-hand side of the sheet the qualities of teaching that they know impact student learning. Make sure participants work on the left-hand side of the paper. Allow 3 minutes: no talking or collaborating during this time Stop: After 3 minutes, ask participants to end their writing and to take a quick look at the list of an elbow partner, comparing for similarities and differences. Ask: After minutes, ask how many people had identical lists. (Same words, same order, etc.)When no one raises their hand, explain that this is why a common definition of practice is beneficial. Next, ask the audience to raise their hand if their list was highly similar to their partner’s. Many participants will raise their hand, so point out that this wisdom of practice if reflected in the Framework for Teaching.

28 Danielson Framework Domains
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Domain 3: Instruction Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities (5 minutes total) The goal of this activity is to connect participants’ qualities of good teaching to the domains of the Framework. View Intro: 5:23 minutes (M.S.) Give Directions: Show the slide “The Domains” and explain that these are the four domains of the Framework. Tell participants to put a #1 beside any item on their list that is related most to Domain 1, a #2 beside any items that most relate to domain 2 and so on for all four domains of the Framework Remind: Only one number per item on the list; decide on ‘best fit’. Allow @ 3 minutes.

29 A Framework for Teaching: 22 Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Participating in a Professional Community Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating with Students Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Setting Instructional Outcomes Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space The goal of this activity is to expand participants’ knowledge of the Framework domains to include the 22 components they contain. Show: Slide, “The Framework for Teaching” and invite participants to adjust the numbers on their list if they need to, based on this additional information. Allow 3 minutes Say: How many had number four as the least frequently occurring item on the list? Why do you think this is so? (because most of us think of the items in Domain 4 as just things we “have to do” and not components that are connected to student learning. Explain that the items on the right-hand side of the chart are the on-stage components of the Framework, those that we see when we observe in a classroom. On the other hand, Domains 1 and 4, on the left, are the off-stage domains of the Framework. They occur outside the act of teaching. Tell participants that, just like any other content, the Framework has its own vocabulary. There are four domains, and 22 components. Ask them to try to use the correct terms when referring to these concepts going forward. Note: if the Framework for Teaching is to be used for teacher evaluation, point out that the off-stage domains are important, and because they are “behind the scenes”, we have to make sure to collect information about them before and after the observed lesson. The goal of this slide is to illustrate that not all components of teaching can be seen during a lesson. Remind: That the “brown” Domains, 1 and 4, are the “off-stage” domains. That is, they don’t happen during teaching, they happen before or after. The green” domains are the “on-stage” domains that are directly experienced during the act of teaching. This is important because teaching is much more than what we can see during the teaching of the lesson. It also suggests that teacher evaluation is much more than just watching a lesson; it includes gather information about a teacher’s planning, and also about the professional responsibilities that the teacher regularly performs. Say that we will see how this concept of “on” and “off” stage is played out in the Pennsylvania teacher evaluation process.

30 Identifying the Domains
Participant Materials Worksheet #2, Page 3 Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Domain 3: Instruction Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities (10 minutes) The goal of this activity is to conclude the initial learning about the Framework by having participants match scenarios to the correct Domain of the Framework. Now, invite participants to extend their learning about the Domains of the Framework, and direct them to Worksheet #2. Instruct them to work as a table group and to place the number of the Domain in the space beside each statement, indicating which Domain is most closely related to that statement. Only one domain number per items is permissible. minutes, then process chorally: facilitator says letter of the item and the class calls out the letter. If there is dissonance, stop and discuss. Answers to WORKSHEET #2: A. 2 B. 3 C. 1 D. 4 E. 1 F. 2 G. 4 H. 1 I. 3 J. 4 K. 2

31 Teacher Effectiveness Rubric
4 Domains 22 Components 4 Possible Ratings for Each Component Failing Needs Improvement Proficient Distinguished Refer to the rubric and note that there are 4 possible ratings for each component within the four domains.

32 Features of A Framework for Teaching
Generic Applies to all grade levels, content areas Not a checklist Is evidence based/reflective Not prescriptive Tells the “what” of teaching, not “how” Comprehensive Includes not just what we can see Inclusive Addresses Novice to Master teacher Show: The slide containing the features of the Framework and explain them as follows: (2 – 3 minutes) Generic: It’s useful to a district to have ONE definition that applies to all teaching situations, all grade levels and all content areas. Not a checklist: Teaching is too complex to be captured in a checklist. We’ll see in a moment that the Framework has rubrics to describe it. Not prescriptive: Doesn't’t tell teachers how to do their work; rather, it tells WHAT qualities of teaching are most likely to produce student learning Comprehensive: As we just saw, it contains both “off-stage” and “on-stage” aspects of teaching Inclusive: Applies to all teachers, from the newest to the most experienced. Ask: Participants to turn and talk to an elbow partner for 2 minutes about why these qualities of the Framework are important and useful. 32

33 A Closer Look at The Framework for Teaching

34 A Framework for Teaching: Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Participating in a Professional Community Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating with Students Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Setting Instructional Outcomes Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space Trainers’ note: participants should be seated in tables of 5 or more participants. Introduce the activity: Direct participants’ attention to the “blue” domain, Instruction. Say: Referring to the slide of the framework, explain that today we’ll take a “deep dive” into one of the domains of the Framework, Domain 3. We chose this “on-stage” domain because it is what most people think of when they think about teaching.

35 Domain 3: Instruction 3a: Communicating with Students 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques 3c: Engaging Students in Learning 3d: Using Assessment During Instruction 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Direct participants to their rubric of Domain 3, found in their resource section and give them a moment or two to skim them. Explain a couple points: 3a has a lot to do with explaining directions and procedures 3b refers to a technique used to advance learning 3c is the most important component of the entire Framework, the purpose for which all other components exist 3d is about assessing students during the act of teaching so that instruction can be modified as it is delivered, if necessary 3e has to do with modifying teaching based on either an appropriate teachable moment, or based on evidence that instruction is not working in some way. Direct participants to Worksheet #3 in their Participant Materials, found on page 4.

36 Exploring Domain 3 Participant Materials Worksheet #3, Page 4
Create a specific example of your assigned component For example, in Component 3a: Ms. T says to Joey, “You dummy!” Do not restate the rubric The goal of this activity is for participants to be able to translate the words in the rubric to a specific example that illustrates the level of performance. Ask participants to “letter off” around their table, “a” through “e”, representing the 5 components of Domain 3. Once each person has been assigned a letter (component) of Domain 3, ask them to reassemble into component-alike groups: all letter a’s together, b’s together and so on. Once participants are settled in their “expert groups”, explain 3 minutes) the process of the activity, in which the goal of the group is to create four very specific examples of their assigned component at each of the four levels of performance. The examples should be created collaboratively and written on the worksheet by all members of the group, not just one recorder. Give a couple more examples in addition to the one on the slide, of specific vs. restating: Specific: 7 students raised their hands to ask for clarification on the directions Restating: The teacher’s directions were vague. Specific: The teacher stopped the lesson, said she could tell students were confused, and regrouped them according to their understanding Restating: The teacher made a smooth, major adjustment to the lesson. Allow: minutes for small groups to finish the assignment. Note: you will need to check each group’s work early, to make sure they are creating specific for instances, not restating the rubric and that everyone is writing the generated examples on their own paper. 36

37 Generalizing about Levels of Performance Participant Materials Worksheet #4, Page 5
What do all the examples of Failing have in common? What do all the Needs Improvement examples have in common? Proficient? Distinguished? The goal of this activity is for participants to generalize the characteristics of the four levels of performance of the Framework, from the examples they hear. Once participants have finished in their expert groups, regroup participants back in their “home” groups Once they are resettled, explain the activity: Invite participants to go around their new group and have each person read the failing example created for their component. While participants are sharing, the rest of the participants in the group should use the worksheet, found on page 5 of their materials, to write down the characteristics of the FAILING level that they are hearing as their colleagues share. They are not to write each example; rather, they are to write the characteristics of the level of performance they are listening to. Explain to participants that they are to repeat this process for the needs improvement, proficient and distinguished levels of performance, going around their group and having each member share their example for that level of performance, while the other members write the characteristics of that level on the worksheet. Allow 12 – 15 minutes for this activity. While participants are working, write “Failing”, “Needs Improvement”, “Proficient”, and “Distinguished” at the top of a piece of chart paper and display the slide. 37

38 Conclusions: Levels of Performance
Failing: Potential for harm Needs Improvement: Inconsistent, novice Proficient: Consistent, competent Distinguished: Unusually excellent, no one “lives” here permanently in all components Conclude: by summarizing each level of performance as follows and inviting participants to add to their charts if necessary: : Failing is dangerous. Harm to students can be done at this level: physical, social, emotional or cognitive harm are possible at this level of teaching performance. Needs Improvement is the novice level. Its hallmark is inconsistency: sometimes the teacher gets it right, and sometimes not. Even experienced teachers can have basic characteristics in their practice for a time if their teaching assignment changes significantly. Proficient is the level at which we expect most of our experienced teachers to function. This is good, solid, consistent teaching. Distinguished is the exceptional level of practice. No one “lives” at this level, nor has every characteristic of this level in all components, because that would mean perfection in teaching, and no teacher is perfect. Distinguished is not just good, or even excellent, teaching. It is teaching that sets itself apart as unusual in its outstanding level of excellence We can all grow and improve, so while we have excellence in our practices sometimes, it is not a place we live all the time in all components. 38

39 Components of Domain 3: Instruction
3a: Communicating with Student 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques 3c: Engaging Students in Learning 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Show: The slide, Components of Domain Three and say: Engaging Students in Learning, is the most important component in the entire Framework. Ask participants to chat at their table groups about the difference between time-on-task and engagement. Allow 2 minutes to do so. Then say: Time-on-task means doing what the teacher asks you to do, regardless of whether the task is challenging or not. . Engagement , on the other hand, is “brain sweat”, or real, challenging thinking. Many times students are on-task, that is, they are doing what the teacher asked them to, but that task does not require real, challenging thinking by each student. Therefore, the students are on-task, but not engaged, which often explains why teachers teach and students don’t learn. Engagement, then, is different from time-on-task, and is about what the brain is doing and whether it constitutes rigor. Engagement is harder to see than time-on-task. Engagement can be thought of as difficult, in a good way. Students would not describe the assignment as easy, or a piece of cake, when engagement is present. Another way to think if it might be “mental tippy toes”. 39

40 A Framework for Teaching: Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Participating in a Professional Community Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating with Students Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Setting Instructional Outcomes Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space Display slide: The Framework for Teaching, Components of Professional Practice, and remind participants that previously we have overviewed the four domains, and have studied Domain 3, an on-stage domain, closely. In this activity, we will learn about an off-stage domain, Domain 1, Planning and Preparation. Point out that while Domains 2 and 3 are observable in the classroom (“on stage”), Domains 1 and 4 require other ways of indicating a teacher’s skill (“off stage”). Artifacts, professional conversation, or portfolios may be used. Be careful in your language: we can’t say that no components of Domain 1 or 4 could EVER be seen during a lesson, but rather, that these components are more likely to be seen in other ways. 40

41 Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students 1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes 1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction 1f: Designing Student Assessments Display slide: Domain 1 – Planning and Preparation and tell participants that Domain 1 contains the components of a good lesson plan, and briefly discuss the different components. These are the items that a teacher thinks about when planning a lesson. Mention that certainly teachers know more about content and pedagogy, (D1a) than we can see in a given lesson. Likewise for D1b, D1d and D1f. Therefore, we like to talk to teachers from time to time, including before an announced observation, to dig a little deeper and to record some of what the teacher tells us. Ask participants to look over the levels of performance rubric for Domain 1, found in the resource materials and ask them to read the distinguished level for each component. Have them note that at the distinguished level of 1f, students help to design some of their own assessments, which helps to explain why this level is not typical, but is exceptional. Allow 3 minutes. 41

42 Component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
Teacher wrote a scholarly article Lesson plans/structure/content/relevance Teacher explanation of probable Students’ misconceptions Teacher’s answers to student questions during class Teacher presented a workshop to faculty Teacher explains the structure of discipline prior to lesson Teacher tells observer how this lesson fits into the larger unit Teacher adjusts the lesson midstream based on Students’ misconceptions Teacher poses different levels of content questions during the lesson Teacher states how this lesson connects to content standards The goal of this slide is to assist participants to begin to identify the kinds of facts teachers share that can be evidence for Domain1. Tell participants that Domain 1 is about the “back story” of teaching. It’s about planning, and all the things the teacher knows, but can’t show, during the act of instruction. Teachers make hundreds of decisions for each lesson that they plan. We don’t expect them to write all this information, but when we talk to them from time to time, we can collect some of it, by writing down what the teacher tells us. Invite participants to think about the on-versus-off stage concept. Have them read SILENTLY the above 10 statements, and think about which could be seen during teaching (on-stage) and which could not. Allow a minute or two, but enforce silence while everyone reads and thinks. When everyone is ready, show the next slide.

43 Component 1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
Teacher wrote a scholarly article Lesson plans/structure/content/relevance Teacher explanation of probable Students’ misconceptions Teacher’s answers to student questions during class Teacher presented a workshop to faculty Teacher explains the structure of discipline prior to lesson Teacher tells observer how this lesson fits into the larger unit Teacher adjusts the lesson midstream based on Students’ misconceptions Teacher poses different levels of content questions during the lesson Teacher states how this lesson connects to content standards When you show this slide, mention that the red-colored statements are related to what would happen during teaching, so they are Domain 3 items, not Domain 1 items. On the other hand, the rest of the items are things that would NOT occur during the teaching of the lesson, but could happen before or after. They give us more insight into what a teacher knows and thinks about when planning a lesson. Tell the audience that our next activity will give us the opportunity to review the kinds of questions we might ask a teacher to learn more about Domain 1 in their practice.

44 Lesson Plan See Observation Process Tab Tools for Teacher Evaluation Packet, Page 2
Read the Domain 1 questions. Why are they important? The goal of this activity is for participants to learn the kinds of information about the components of Domain 1 that a teacher possesses, but that we don’t always see easily. A second goal is for the audience to understand that unless teachers are given an opportunity to respond to questions about the “hidden” parts of their practice, we cannot know about them. Direct participants to the worksheet, found on page 6 of the Participant Materials. Explain to participants that this form contains Domains 1 and 4, and questions to elicit information from the teacher about them. Review the form and the questions it contains. Say that when we ask these types of questions, we get at some of the teacher’s knowledge that might not be visible during the teaching of the lesson. Allow a few minutes for people to discuss the questions, and some of the kinds of answers teachers might give. Tell participants to “jot dot”(bullet, briefly) some of the kinds of information a teacher might provide in response to the prompts for Domain 1 ONLY. (We will study Domain 4 later) Allow 10 minutes.  Walk around as participants work to see if they are providing the kinds of “background info” about that component that might not be seen during a lesson. For example, for component 1b, teachers know more about students than we might see during one lesson. What kinds of things are these? How does the teacher get information about the students? How is this used in planning lessons? Activity: Collecting responses If time permits, invite participants to get up, move about the room, and collect some teacher responses for one or more of the components of Domain 1 from someone in the room with whom they don’t usually work.   Allow 5 minutes.

45 A Framework for Teaching: Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Participating in a Professional Community Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating with Students Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Setting Instructional Outcomes Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space Display slide of Components of the Framework. Remind participants that they have already studied two domains of A Framework for Teaching, Domains 3 and 1 respectively. Explain that we are now ready to explore the second “on-stage” domain of the framework, Domain 2, and that we will do so using a graphic organizer structure and by answering a focus question in a modified jigsaw fashion. 45

46 The Classroom Environment
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c: Managing Classroom Procedures 2d: Managing Student Behavior 2e: Organizing the Physical Space Note to trainer: The trainer will model the process using component 2a, Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport. Participants will then be grouped into four groups, one each for the remaining four components of Domain 2, and work in those groups to create a graphic organizer and to answer the focus question for their assigned component. Only the responses to focus questions will then be shared with the larger group, who will collect them on their Worksheet #5b in the spaces provided. Display slide Domain 2: The Classroom Environment. Discuss each component briefly, mentioning that Domain 2 is sometimes thought of as the “affective” domain of the framework, because the level of the teacher’s performance in components 2a, Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport, and 2d, Managing Student Behavior, contribute significantly to how students feel about school and about themselves. Component 2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning, also speaks to the teacher’s beliefs about students’ abilities to learn; therefore, Domain 2 contributes significantly to students’ emotions toward school and learning. Other points to be made about the components: 2a is not only about how the teacher treats the students and vise versa, but also about how students treat each other. Another way to think about 2b is that it’s all about rigor and setting high expectations 2c has to do with extracting maximum time for teaching/learning, by managing procedures seamlessly 2d is done best when it’s invisible 2e is related to making the physical space match the learning goals 46

47 Participant Materials
Concept Map Participant Materials Worksheet #5, Page 6

48 Concept Map Domain 2: Establishing a Culture for Learning Big Idea:
Classroom Environment Next, model what you want participants to do, using Component 2a, Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport. Invite participants to watch as you talk through the process of creating the concept map. Ask participants to locate Component 2a, Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport, on page 64, in the book, Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching or in their rubric handout, and give them 5 minutes to read the rubric for 2a.  While they are doing this, reproduce the concept map structure on a piece of chart paper, and write “2a: Respect/Rapport” in the top circle. .(See slide, Concept Map) Once participants have finished reading, ask them to examine the concept map for component 2a as you have prepared it (Refer to the example at the end of the leader notes.) Pose the following question: From what you just read, what is the big idea of 2a? That is, how does 2a contribute to student learning? Elicit a few responses from non-volunteers, and write an appropriate one on the concept map. (See example.) Then, for component 2a, ask participants in their table groups to make a decision about which components of A Framework for Teaching this element is tightly connected to, and why. Allow 4 minutes for this activity. (See example that is provided in the leader notes. This component might be in any domain of A Framework for Teaching.) Elicit appropriate responses and write them on the concept map. Component: 3C Engaging Students in Learning UDL Component: 4C Communicating with Families Culturally appropriate info Component: 1B Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Student background

49 Focus Questions for Domain 2 Participant Materials Worksheet #6, Page 7
Browse Domain 2 of your Rubric Reflect and independently answer questions on Worksheet #6 Table Share Browse Domain 2 of your Rubric Reflect and answer questions on Worksheet #6 Independently Table Share 49

50 A Framework for Teaching: Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Participating in a Professional Community Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating with Students Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Setting Instructional Outcomes Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space Explain to participants that the grey-colored components are those we have already studied. We are now ready to investigate Domain 4, its relationship to student learning and its importance to novices and to experienced teachers. Remind participants that Domain 4 is the other “off-stage” domain of the framework. It’s safe to say that Domain 4 is virtually never visible during the act of teaching, yet each component is connected to student learning in specific ways. 50

51 Professional Responsibilities
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities 4a: Reflecting on Teaching 4b: Maintaining Accurate Records 4c: Communicating with Families 4d: Participating in a Professional Community 4e: Growing and Developing Professionally 4f: Showing Professionalism Briefly discuss each of the components of Domain 4, making the following points: The role of reflection in adult learning is well-documented. However, many teachers do not reflect in the ways that produce learning. Recordkeeping is designed to inform teachers about trends and patterns in learning, both individual and group so that instruction can be modified appropriately. Notification is not communication as it is intended in this component. Professional learning communities (PLCs) are an important support for teacher learning 4f primarily focuses on advocacy for students who are traditionally underserved 51

52 Lesson Plan Participant Materials Worksheet #7, Page 8
Skim the rubrics in Domain 4 Have a table conversation about HOW these components might impact student learning Self Select an “expert” Group Develop a Distinguished response for your Component. The goal of this activity is for participants to learn the evidence of Domain 4 in a teacher’s practice. Ask participants to locate and read their rubrics for Domain 4. Allow about 5 minutes for this study. Then invite participants to turn and talk to someone near to them, about how each component of Domain 4 might impact student learning. Allow 3 minutes, or more, if necessary.   Then direct participants to the Lesson Plan. We have worked on the left-hand side of this page, Domain 1, earlier. Now we will revisit it for Domain 4. Remind participants that Domain 4 is the other off-stage domain. We would not see these components during teaching, but questions posed to the teacher can elicit information about his/her practice in this Domain. After getting into expert groups – A through f… participants to read the prompt associated with each D4 component of their expert group in the rubric, and to write a possible excellent answer to each – work as a group. They should reference their rubrics for Domain 4 at the proficient or distinguished level as they do so. 12 minutes. Select some non-volunteers to share one or more of their responses. Make clear, in closing that teachers can answer these questions during pre- or post-teaching conferences, to provide more evidence about their practice. 52

53 Uses of A Framework for Teaching
Self-Assessment Reflection Peer Coaching Teacher Evaluation Mentoring and Induction Professional Growth Plans Now display the slide, “ Uses of the Framework” and remind participants that the Framework articulates what good teaching looks like and what it doesn't’t look like. It provides us with a common language, a roadmap for the terrain, so to speak. Use of the Framework for Teaching for these various purposes tends to elevate the work . 53

54 Benefits of Using A Framework for Teaching
Common Language Similar vision for good teaching and how it can be improved Greater validity and reliability in the teacher evaluation process Changes in novice thinking Opportunities for collaboration Invite participants to consider the slide for 30 seconds or so without discussion. Then invite volunteers to share any observations they have about the benefits of using the Framework within teaching and school practice. 54

55 5 “Rules” for Teacher Supervision and Evaluation
Defensible definition of teaching Differentiation of evaluative processes Evidence-driven process The role of teacher learning Transparency Invite participants to notice the five best practices/rules for doing teacher evaluation right. Explain that we will we working on each of these practices for the next two days.

56 Overarching Question Who does the thinking?
Therefore, who does the learning and growing? Tell participants that, in the classroom, we know that the “work” of learning needs to be done by the students themselves, not by the teacher. That is, we look to see who is doing the real “thinking” in classrooms, and we know that when students do it, real learning happens. In teacher evaluation historically, the position of the teacher within the evaluation process has NOT been that of learner: Teachers have tended to be passive: the observer collects the information, analyzes it, and presents the conclusions to the teacher who primarily listens. If the teacher is to grow their already competent practices, then THEY need to do some of that work: collecting, analyzing and concluding. This changed role of the teacher makes some of the traditional teacher evaluation practices look quite different, which we will see as we continue our learning.

57 Rule # 1: Defensible Definition of Teaching
Start with a defensible definition of good teaching that is studied, and understood, by all stakeholders. Tell participants that we spent all of our time yesterday experiencing Pennsylvania’s definition of good teaching, which is the Framework for Teaching, otherwise known as the research-based standards for teaching. Now we will experience a quick review of that definition of practice.

58 A Framework for Teaching: Components of Professional Practice
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities Reflecting on Teaching Maintaining Accurate Records Communicating with Families Contributing to the School and District Growing and Developing Professionally Showing Professionalism Domain 3: Instruction Communicating Clearly and Accurately Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques Engaging Students in Learning Using Assessment in Instruction Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 1: Planning and Preparation Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy Demonstrating Knowledge of Students Selecting Instruction Goals Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources Designing Coherent Instruction Assessing Student Learning Domain 2: The Classroom Environment Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport Establishing a Culture for Learning Managing Classroom Procedures Managing Student Behavior Organizing Physical Space Remind participants that we experienced the four domains earlier, and we learned that two of the four domains are “off-stage” and that, to learn more about these in a teacher’s practice, we can talk with the teacher, pose questions, examine artifacts, and so on.

59 The Card Sort 1) Working independently, use a sticky note to label each card with the Domain & Component to which it is most closely aligned 2) Share with a table partner to establish consensus (See Answer Key) 3) Work with your group to determine the Level of Performance for each scenario NOTE: Prior to this activity, you will need to distribute the colored Card Sort cards, so that there is one card for each person and that each table group has cards of all four colors. The purpose of this activity is for participants to revisit the Framework for Teaching and to connect an individual scenario to one domain/component/element and level of performance. Direct participants to place a sticky note on their card, and to locate the rubrics of the Framework, found on pp. 2 Ask them to work alone for a couple minutes to read their scenario and to assign it to a domain/component/element of the Framework, and to write this on their post-it note and affix it to their card.. While there may be more than one possible connection, they are to select the best one. Do not let them confer at this time, but rather, work alone. 3 – 5 minutes. At the end of this time, Tell participants that the color of the cards is significant: Yellow=Domain 1, Blue=Domain 2, Pink=Domain 3, and Green=Domain4. Invite correction on their post-its at this time. Next, ask participants to share their scenario with their table group, and develop consensus about the best answer.

60 Rule # 2: Differentiation of Evaluative Process
Differentiate the processes of evaluation for novices, experienced teachers, and teachers at risk. Tell participants that we have conducted a review of our standards of good teaching, known as the Framework, through this Card Sort activity. We will now focus on the other best practices for evaluating teaching, not teachers. Teachers are different in the same way that students are different. Therefore, we should modify our evaluative processes with this in mind. Explain that teachers are different the same ways that students are different: skill level and experience. Good teacher evaluation systems typically honor these differences by providing closer supervision and support to those teachers who need it and allow greater variation and independence to teachers whose practices show evidence of competence. Evaluation Forms: 426 New, 427 3yrs and 6 evaluations for Instructional II and 428 (All tenured teachers)

61 Differentiated Supervision
Novice/Untenured Very close observation and assessment Experienced/Tenured Presumption of professionalism At-Risk Not punitive Formal and informal observation of teaching is key + teacher interviews + artifacts Structured process 1/3yr. Other years: informals + teacher interviews+ professional goal-setting Intensive, extensive team-based support based on persistent unsatisfactory performance in one or more components 2 – 4 formal times per year; multiple informal observations Professional Goal-Setting: Choose from a list of rigorous, approved activities Clear goals, outcomes, evidence and timelines anchor No self-directed activities Activities produce evidence which is then evaluated Designed for the teacher who can, and wishes, to improve Briefly mention that that most typical forms of differentiation include frequent novice observations (2 – 4/year) and experienced teachers being evaluation formally less frequently with alternate evaluations taking the form of Professional Growth Plans. Say that Pennsylvania is in Phase I of its new evaluation program, so we don’t yet know what differentiation will look like in its final form, but that novice must be evaluated more frequently than experienced teachers. This makes good sense, since we must make consequential decisions about these professions that will have a last impact upon school culture. Make clear to participants that we have some suggestions/ideas for differentiation – especially for experienced teachers and using the framework with the intent to reduce the workload for evaluators – and increase the learning for teachers… but we will hold that for follow up – as this is for pilot of the process and we don’t know what PA’s system will look like at the moment. Remind participants that one of the reasons we might differentiate teacher evaluation is for the same reason that classroom teachers use multiple types of assessments for students: we get to see more of what they know and can do when we look at practice through multiple lenses. Ask them to keep in mind that this evaluation system places the teacher in a much more active role because that it what learning looks like.

62 Differentiated Supervision
What would the process look like to include differentiated supervision in our supervision model? Review of PDE Guidelines Collaboration with stakeholders (central administration, teacher association, and school board) Development of differentiated supervision modes How does a principal provide a summative evaluation of a teacher in differentiated supervision? Act 82 states that all professional employees must be evaluated every year and temporary professional employees must be evaluated at least twice a year. The summative evaluation will be completed using the PDE Ratings Form.

63 Differentiated Supervision (continued)
How do I obtain ratings for the four Danielson domains since the teacher did not participate in clinical supervision for that year? Data is reviewed on a yearly basis; therefore, much of that data can be used in the four evaluative domains. If there is no data for a specific domain, then the score for that domain would revert to the previous year’s evaluation. Remember, the teachers in differentiated supervision have been rated proficient (satisfactory) in the previous two years. Are teachers within differentiated supervision still required to develop Elective Data / SLOs? YES  Differentiated supervision is the observation side of the pie chart and the Elective Data / SLOs are part of the multiple measures side of the pie.

64 Rule # 3: Evidence Driven Process
Let evidence -not opinion- anchor the process. Next we will learn about evidence, a keystone of the process. Explain that typical evaluation systems involve the observer watching the lesson and then writing down what they thought about it. They write advice, opinion, suggestions, likes, dislikes, etc. Say that this is not the practice in an evidence-driven system for two reasons: Evidence, or facts, form the foundation of good decision-making. We always need to collect the relevant facts first, then make decisions. In a growth-focused model, the evaluator AND the teacher evaluate the evidence, separately, and then compare their thinking. In this way, learning is done by the learner, the teacher.

65 Evidence Evidence is a factual reporting of events. It may include descriptions of teacher and student actions and behaviors. It may also include artifacts prepared by the teacher, students or others. It is not clouded with personal opinion or biases. It is selected using professional judgment by the observer and/or the teacher. Allow participants a moment to read this slide, and then say that we will be doing a series of activities now to teach us about evidence and how to collect it.

66 Bias or Preference? Teaching you do not like is not necessarily bad teaching. Teaching can be highly successful in an approach or style you would not have personally chosen. Watch the input of our bias or opinion in good teaching.

67 Types of Observation Evidence
Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments: “Could one person from each table collect materials?” Descriptions of observed teacher or student behavior: The teacher stands by the door, greeting students as they enter. Numeric information about time, student participation, resource use, etc.: Three students of the eighteen offer nearly all of the comments during discussion. An observed aspect of the environment: The assignment is on the board for students to do while roll is taken. Say that we are moving now toward collecting evidence. Elicit examples from participants of types of observation evidence collection. Use large post it sheets with title on top: Scripting, Descriptions, Numeric Information and Environment. (This is optional if we have enough time to complete!)

68 Evidence or Opinion? The teacher has a warm relationship with the students. The teacher said that the South should have won the Civil War. The table groups were arranged in 2 x 2 pods. The materials and supplies were organized well. Wait time was insufficient for student thinking. The teacher stated that students have learned to add 2-digit numbers in preparation for today’s lesson. 6 students, questioned randomly, did not know the day’s learning goals. Ask participants to read the statements on the slide SILENTLY and decide which are evidence and which are opinion. After a minute or so, provide the correct answers: O E If any questions arise, explain, for #2, that it is a fact that the teacher said the words in #2. this makes it evidence. Say further that words like “warm relationship” , “organized well”, or “insufficient thinking” are opinions, no descriptions of what was seen and heard. So, what made the observer THINK the relationship was warm? What was ssen and heard? What makes a room well-organized? What was seen and heard?

69 Evidence or Opinion? The teacher has a warm relationship with the students. The teacher said that the South should have won the Civil War. The table groups were arranged in 2 x 2 pods. The materials and supplies were organized well. Wait time was insufficient for student thinking. The teacher stated that students have learned to add 2-digit numbers in preparation for today’s lesson. 6 students, questioned randomly, did not know the day’s learning goals. Ask participants to read the statements on the slide SILENTLY and decide which are evidence and which are opinion. After a minute or so, provide the correct answers: O E If any questions arise, explain, for #2, that it is a fact that the teacher said the words in #2. this makes it evidence. Say further that words like “warm relationship” , “organized well”, or “insufficient thinking” are opinions, no descriptions of what was seen and heard. So, what made the observer THINK the relationship was warm? What was ssen and heard? What makes a room well-organized? What was seen and heard?

70 Evidence vs. Opinion Activity
Participant Materials Worksheet #8, Pages 9-10 Allow participants a moment to read this slide, and then say that we will be doing a series of activities now to teach us about evidence and how to collect it. Direct participants into their Participant Materials, Worksheet 8, page “Evidence vs. Opinion”. And invite them to complete it as a table group. (If time is a factor, you may choose divide the assignment.) Explain that the items in the left column are types of statements an observer might write based upon an observation. Some of them are evidence and some of them are not. They should decide if each statement is evidence or opinion and should write “E” or “O” in the column based on their decision. If the statement is opinion, they should REWRITE the statements to be a statement of evidence. Finally, for each statement, they should decide which domain and component of the Framework to which each statement refers and write that domain/component (d/c) in the final column. 10 minutes, more if necessary, then review the answers as a whole group. (Note: there is no absolute correct answer to the domain and component connections for each item, but you should listen carefully for rationale and push for “better” thinking if an answer seems weak.

71 Evidence…Observation-based Assessment: Process and Evidence
Pre-Observation Domains 1 and 4 Standard Lesson Plan with Components of Domain 1- Evidence provided by Teacher Observation: Domains 1, 2 and 3 Standard Evidence Collection Document – Shared with Teachers Post-Teaching Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4 Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics and additions/correction of evidence gathered Collaborative Assessment Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4 Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-Assessment Rubric

72 Step 1 Pre-Observation – Domains 1 & 4
2 days before: Teacher provides evidence using Lesson Plan Form The goal is for the teacher to be Distinguished in Domain I: Planning and Preparation Teacher and evaluator discuss evidence provided Evaluator collects additional evidence through questioning Pre-Observation – Domain 1 and 4

73 Practice Participant Materials Worksheet 9, Page 11
Watch the pre-observation conference 6th grade middle school math Add to the evidence on the Lesson Plan form for Domains 1 and 4 Write evidence only. Need Lesson Plan Document (already completed) to add to the evidence Prepare to show the video by asking participants to locate their lesson plan form in the Participants Materials. Tell them they will write down what they hear the teacher saying about his upcoming lesson. Show the video clip of the ASCD Framework pre-observation video for the 6th grade middle school math lesson, 2 minutes in length. Have them collect evidence, Domains 1, 4. Invite them next to discuss what questions they would pose to the teacher if they could speak with him, and point out that were they able to do so, they would record this evidence on this form as well. Make sure that participants recorded under component 4e the information that the teacher offered about his professional development with the Smartboard. Say that it is important to use the pre-observation conference to elicit as much information about the upcoming lesson as possible.

74 Step 2 The Observation: Domains 1, 2, & 3
Evaluator arrives early – Walks the Walls Evidence is collected during the lesson (Avoid opinions) Evaluator provides teacher with evidence collected during the observation Pre-Observation – Domain 1 and 4

75 Collecting Observation Evidence (Domain 2 & 3) Participant Materials Worksheet 10, Page 12
Watch the lesson, 6th Grade Math. Collect evidence of what you see and hear. If you aren’t sure where to write the evidence, just write it. This is practice; relax. As you prepare to watch the video of the middle school math lesson for which you collected evidence of planning, ask participants to skim the components of D2, D3, focusing on the priority components, which are shaded. Remind them that evidence is what you see and hear;, not what you think about it. We are describing only. Show the video of the lesson and collect evidence with the participants. Following the lesson, ask participants to sit quietly for a few minutes reviewing their evidence and to add any evidence that they didn't’t have time to record. After 3 – 4 minutes, ask participants to compare their evidence with others sitting near them, and to add any evidence they missed, and to reorganize their evidence (arrows are fine) based on discussion. 10 minutes for this activity.

76 Points about Evidence All questions are not about 3b
Engagement is about the nature of the work and who does it Formative assessments should assess whether EACH student met the objectives. Help participants to think about the points on the slide.

77 Step 3 Preparing for Post-Observation – Domains 1, 2, 3, & 4
Evaluator assesses; identifies areas of disagreement for discussion (No need to discuss areas of agreement) Teacher self-assesses and gives to evaluator Pre-Observation – Domain 1 and 4

78 Middle School Math Observation Participant Materials Worksheet 11, Pages 13-17
Self-Assessment done by Middle School Math teacher Read carefully, at your table groups, react to the teacher’s analysis of the evidence. Where do you agree? Where do you disagree? Do not include your own opinions. Use only evidence to support the ranking on the rubric.

79 Mark Components of Agreement
DO mark the components of agreement on the single copy of the rubric. Do NOT mark components with which you are not in agreement. Keep these in mind when talking with the teacher. Always let evidence, or the lack there of, determine the level in the rubric. Tell participants that the next part of the process of evaluation is for the evaluator to review the teacher’s self-assessment, as we just did, and then to mark the components of agreement only on their own rubric. They are to work as a table group and to locate their own rubric (handout copies). They are to consider, for now, just these components, in their work. Note: this is very difficult for participants. They seem to automatically want to mark all components, whether they agree with the teacher’s self-assessment or not. You will need to watch closely to see that participants are doing this work correctly.

80 Step 4 Post-Teaching Collaborative Assessment Domains: 1, 2, 3, & 4
Teacher and evaluator discuss agreed upon items (if needed) Evaluator invites teacher to discuss areas of disagreement Teacher develops a self-assessment summary Pre-Observation – Domain 1 and 4

81 Post Observation Process
Greenberg video of post Compare your assessment to that of Greenberg and his observers

82 The Purpose of the Post-Observation Conference
To discuss the components of difference (not yet marked by observer) To elicit any evidence that still remains to be added about the lesson To arrive at an assessment on the rubric for components of difference.

83 Words NOT to Use in the Post-Observation Conference
Defend Prove Argue Convince Avoid language that suggests opposition or that might bring about a defensive response

84 Language for the Post-Observation Conference
Say more about. . . Comment on the evidence for. . . Let’s look at the rubric for. . . What is the best match for. . . What’s the backstory for. . .

85 Framing Suggestions as Questions Participant Materials Worksheet #13 page 20
Change the comment to a question that will elicit the correct response from the teacher. Who is to do the thinking? Who is to do the growing? The goals of this activity is for participants to learn the skill of turning suggestions into questions. Point out, again, that this work positions the TEACHER as an analyst of the evidence, of thinker, problem solver and generator of next steps. Corrections and respectful differing thinking are encouraged on both sides, but evaluators are asked to avoid the “telling” model, since telling is not the best way to produce learning. Tell participants that we will now explore ways to elicit FROM THE TEACHER suggestions and next steps. Direct participants to their Participant materials, and tell them change the “advice” they see into a question. Work the first example with the group: Instead of “Try calling on genders more equally”, a question might be, “What are some strategies you might use to insure that boys and girls get called upon equally?” Invite the group to work with a partner to do the same with the remaining examples. Process by calling upon non-volunteers for responses.

86 Rule # 4: Teacher Learning Integral
Conduct evaluations in such a way that they produce teacher learning.

87 Paradigm Shift Who Collects/Provides Evidence? Both teacher and evaluator Evaluation is not done TO you; it is done with you and for you Point out that this growth-focused process of evaluation positions the teacher as an active participant in the process. Ask participants to turn to an elbow partner and describe where, in the process, the teacher provides evidence and elicit the following: The lesson plan and pre-conference Following the observation, teacher may add to the evidence During the post-conference.

88 Professional Learning
“Learning is done by the learner; it is mental WORK.” - Charlotte Danielson Who does the mental work in your evaluation process? (Overarching Question)

89 The Nature of Professional Learning: Mental Work for Teachers
Reflection on practice Collaboration Self-assessment Self-directed inquiry (action research) Feedback based upon evidence Tell participants that when teacher evaluation is conducted intentionally to produce teacher learning, it deliberately incorporates the characteristics found on the slide. Ask participants to discuss with a partner where in the process we have studied each of these characteristics are found. Say that the methods we have recommended for doing this work are deliberate. They are required to assure that learning happens,. Hattie, Marzano, DuFour references to the research.

90 “Narrative-Free”Evaluation
The rubric contains the narrative Select the language that matches the evidence The teacher participates in language selection The highlighter is the tool A summative domain statement is optional Finally, explain that this process avoids the traditional narrative. A rubric might be thought of as a bank of potential narrative statements. We select the ones that best match with the evidence, by highlighting. Once we have done this, and attached the evidence to the rubric, no narrative is required.

91 Supporting Teachers Correctly
Directive Collaborative Non-Directive From evaluator to teacher Back and forth From teacher to evaluator Immoral, illegal, dangerous, clueless Both have ideas to contribute The teacher deserves to take the lead Drowning Swimming Championship Swimming

92 Rule # 5: Transparency Teachers must learn the rubrics and the process. How might this happen in your setting? In closing, make it clear that an important aspect of this training is to make the process and the role of teachers clear. It is expected that this process (or a representative version of it) will be shared with teachers in each school into which this work arrives.

93 Involving All Stakeholders
Many teacher evaluation systems fail due to resistance that comes from the perception that the evaluation system resulted from the secret efforts of an elite few.

94 Notification is NOT Communication
Communication is two-way-- not one-way

95 Post Teaching Conference Observation Summary See Observation Process Tab Tools for Teacher Evaluation Packet, Page 4 What are the teacher’s strengths? (2 max.) What are the teacher’s MOST IMPORTANT areas for growth? (2 max.) What are the steps to be taken to heighten performance?

96 Walk-throughs See Observation Process Tab Tools for Teacher Evaluation Packet, Page 5
Observational (Domains 2, 3) Conversational (Domains 1, 4)

97 Evidence…Observation-based Assessment: Process and Evidence See Observation Process Tab Tools for Teacher Evaluation Packet, Page 8 Process Evidence Pre-Observation Domains 1 and 4 Standard Lesson Plan with Components of Domain 1- Evidence provided by Teacher Observation: Domains 1, 2 and 3 Standard Evidence Collection Document – Shared with Teachers Post-Teaching Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4 Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics and additions/correction of evidence gathered Collaborative Assessment Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4 Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-Assessment Rubric Tell participants to revisit the steps in the process. Refer them to the “STEPS/STAGES” section for the Steps in the Teacher Effectiveness….” doc. Remind them that: Teachers get a copy of the evidence immediately following the lesson Teachers may add to the evidence Teachers use the evidence to complete a self-assessment Teachers assess the lesson by highlighting the appropriate rubric phrases Teachers provide this assessment TO THE OBSERVER IN ADVANCE OF THE POST TEACHING CONFERENCE The observer review the teacher’s evidence prior to the post. The observer highlights, on his/her rubric the COMPONENTS OF AGREEMENT ONLY prior to the post The observer LEAVES BLANK the components of difference prior to the post

98 Reminder: Steps in the Process
Teachers get a copy of the evidence immediately following the lesson Teachers may add to the evidence Teachers use the evidence to complete a self-assessment Teachers assess the lesson by highlighting the appropriate rubric phrases Teachers provide this assessment to the observer in advance of the post teaching conference The observer review the teacher’s evidence prior to the post. The observer highlights in a different color, on his/her rubric, the components of agreement only prior to the post. The observer leaves blank the components of difference prior to the post conference (the evaluator highlights the component numbers for easy reference).

99 Understanding the Relationship Between Observation and
Evaluation

100 Revisit Your Agree or Disagree Assessment
Do you wish to change any answers? Report out results

101 Observation is Not Evaluation
Evaluation of teaching is the sum of a number of observations, artifacts and conversations that, together, provide a clear picture of the teaching practice.

102 The Purpose of Teacher Supervision and Evaluation
Professional Learning Quality Assurance (Widget Effect) Tell participants that we will be exploring, in the next two days, how to use best practices for teacher evaluation, using the PA Teacher evaluation process. Remind them that there are two purposes for teacher evaluation as state on the slide, but that mostly we focus only on the first one: getting a “grade” Best practices research focuses on the second one, professional learning, because most teachers’ practices are good. Still we all need to grow, since all students can always learn more, so the practices we will experiences are not focused on “gotcha”, but on how we acknowledge strengths and continue to grow.

103 Suggested Observation Cycle Level II Teachers
Walk-through (Sept.) Announced Observation (Oct. – Dec.) Walk-through (Dec. – Jan.) Unannounced Observation (Feb. – April) Walk-through (April – June)

104 Suggested Observation Cycle Level 1 Teachers
Cycle 1 Walk-through (Sept.) Announced Observation (Oct.) Walk-through (Nov.) Walk-through (Dec.) Cycle 2 Walk-through (Jan.) Unannounced Observation (Feb.) Walk-through (Mar.) Walk-through (Apr.) Walk-through (May - optional)

105

106 Rating Teacher Effectiveness
Teacher Observation and Practice = 50% Domain 1 Domain 2 Domain 3 Domain 4 Multiple Measures of Student Performance = 50% Building Level Score (SPP) = 15% Teacher Specific Rating (ex. PVAAS) = 0-15% Elective Rating (SLOs) = 35-20% For 85% Observation & 15% SPP 106

107 Electronic Rating Tool
rver.pt/community/educator_effective ness_project/20903

108 Suggestions for Further Growth, Practice, & Support

109 PowerPoint & Resources
CIU10 posts current resources and information under the Leadership link on our website:

110 Building Evaluator Reliability
Reliability refers to similarity of conclusion/consistency Consistency is a function of consensus- building activities Evaluators must practice consensus building activities regularly Refer to Teachscape Now, tell participants that we will continue to build our own reliability by collecting and comparing evidence for Domains 2, 3. Make sure participants are using the EVIDENCE COLLECTION FORM FOR D2, D3 FOUND ON PAGE 4 OF “TOOLS”. Make sure that they write on this document when they collect evidence for the on-stage components for the elementary teaching lesson. Show the video and collect evidence along with the group. (Elementary Classroom) J.Maher, grade 3 Language Arts

111 Professional Development

112 Questions? bbaker@ciu10.org sbickford@ciu10.org
Up to three questions or concerns you hope will be addressed. – share at your table – value add – report out….


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