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Week 3 Thursday. E3.Fig19A, B E3.5A, B E3.6A E3.7A E3.12A Supplies Figurative language Literary device Colored pencils or markers (1 set per student)

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Presentation on theme: "Week 3 Thursday. E3.Fig19A, B E3.5A, B E3.6A E3.7A E3.12A Supplies Figurative language Literary device Colored pencils or markers (1 set per student)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 3 Thursday

2 E3.Fig19A, B E3.5A, B E3.6A E3.7A E3.12A Supplies Figurative language Literary device Colored pencils or markers (1 set per student)

3 Characterization Internal development External development

4 Continue to use the novel from Daily Lesson 4 or begin a new short story that includes shifts in point of view. Prepare to explain relevant background information and historical context of the selected short story or novel. Prepare to review characterization addressed in slides of the PowerPoint: Literary Devices of Fiction. Prompt #2 (Daily Lesson 7): Write about a time when you or someone close to you has undergone physical and emotional changes in response to a life experience.

5 Authors use literary techniques and elements to heighten interest, appeal to an audience, and effectively communicate a message. How do perspectives on the human condition emerge in literature?

6 Authors use literary techniques and elements to heighten interest, appeal to an audience, and effectively communicate their message. How do the perspectives on the human condition emerge in literature?

7 Characterization is the creation of imaginary persons so that they seem lifelike. There are three fundamental methods of characterization. ©2011, TESCCC 06/08/12 Slide 15 of 28

8 The explicit presentation by the author of the character through direct description, either in an introductory block or, more commonly, woven throughout the work and illustrated by action (external characterization). ©2011, TESCCC 06/08/12 Slide 16 of 28

9 The presentation of a character in action, with little or no explicit comment by the author, with the expectation that the reader can deduce the attributes of the character from his/her actions (external characterization). ©2011, TESCCC 06/08/12 Slide 17 of 28

10 The representation from within a character, without comment by the author, of the impact of actions and emotions on the character’s inner self (internal characterization). ©2011, TESCCC 06/08/12 Slide 18 of 28

11 Internal Character Development Feelings Thoughts Emotions External Character Development Actions Relationships Dialogues ©2011, TESCCC 06/08/12 Slide 19 of 28

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14 Internal response of a character – a response demonstrated through inner thoughts and feelings External response of the characters – a response demonstrated by the character through speech or actions. Students may believe that they can give their own opinions to answer questions without providing textual evidence as support. However, for open-ended questions, students must provide text evidence from the selections provided.

15 Name List some adjectives Age Speech Formality, Accent, Speed, Tone Emotions and Thoughts What is typical of this character? Effect on Others How do others feel about character? Typical Actions Actions typical of this character Appearan ce Review: Character:

16 Ideas:

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18 Brainstorm: create a conflict that captures your theme

19 Brainstorm : a character that would experience the conflict

20 Figurative language - language not intended to be taken literally but layered with meaning through the use of imagery, metaphors, and other literary devices. The author’s background is important in allowing students to read more deeply. The time frame of the author’s life, as well as the time frame of the setting can have a significant impact on a story and on the language the author uses.

21 Performance Indicator: “Write multiple reflections, including personal and world connections, thoughts, and responses to literary texts and media.”

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23 Writing Appetizer. Who is the writer of the quote? Record the information in the Reader’s Notebook. When was the text written and what were important happenings in government, politics, society, history, etc.? How could the time period affect the language an author uses? Discuss responses.

24 What other historical or cultural factors might influence the author’s style? Discuss responses. Pay close attention to how people spoke during this time—the words they used, sayings, etc. (Example: fly—insect, fly— what a plane or bird does, fly—the zipper on pants, fly—cool.)

25 Read the selected portion of the text with me so that you may understand the Flow of the writing. Skim the text to identify examples of historical or cultural influence on the author’s use of figurative language. Provide textual evidence for conclusions they draw. Discuss identified examples

26 Continue reading the text. As you read, identify examples of figurative language the author uses. In the Reader’s Notebook, relate how the historical or cultural context influences the writer, supporting your ideas with textual evidence.

27 Colored pencils or markers (1 set per student)

28 How does the historical or cultural context of a text influence the author’s use of figurative language? Volunteers share examples they recorded in the Reader’s Notebook.


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